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Discussion Starter #1
I'm looking to buy my first bow for hunting. I've never so much a picked up any kind of bow in my life. I'm 21 years old 5'6" so I know that my draw length will be short and I'll have to work my draw weight up br practice. Just wondering if yall have any advice on a first bow. Leaning towards the diamond infinite edge even though I've heard the rest and sight should be replaced asap. Thanks.
 

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Shoot several, if your shop will let you. If not, find another shop. Even bows "out of your price range". If you LIKE what you LIKE, you can always look for that model and buy used (craigslist, here in the classifieds).

The Bowtech "Fuel" has really good reviews, is essentially the Infinite Edge riser and limbs with better cams, and an adjustable limb stop that gives it a really solid back wall (the feeling when you reach the end of your draw that it "stops hard", rather than some vague "spongy" feeling as if you could pull it further). Slightly higher price (new) than the I-Edge (IIRC), and only available at a BowTech Dealer/Pro Shop rather than a big box (such as Cabela's, Bass Pro, etc.). Near-same adjustability.

Hoyt, Bear, and Mathews also have some ultra-adjustable bows out there, as well as I think Elite. BUT, you don't have to limit yourself to just those type, as ultra-adjustability also comes with compromises. Just the nature of the beast: they cannot be ALL things to ALL people perfectly, but can do MOST of that reasonably well.

I bought The Wife a Carbon Rose last year as her first "real" bow, and she absolutely loves it. I have shot it, and if I were in the market for another, I would go for the Carbon Knight or Carbon Overdrive myself - the Rose and Eva Shockey carbon models are somewhat "aimed" toward women, but the Rose is essentially a "short draw" version of the Knight, and the Eva Shockey is a short draw version of the Carbon Overdrive - both Overdrive models get rave reviews, by men and women alike. Either one look great to me, but draw length adjustment tops out just shy of my draw length (they are 21" to 25", IIRC - "standard draw" models START at 26", and go to 30").

So far as rests and sights: even the "cheap" sights are better by miles than anything I ever saw back in the '80s and early '90s, on ANY bow (when I had last been in Archery, until last year). Some love them, some hate them, but Whisker Biscuit rests are relatively inexpensive, reasonably accurate, and durable as a stone. The Octane "toothbrush" rest really did not fit The Wife's CR well at all - I could not get center shot set on it except at the extreme-end of the range. I believe because of the thickness of the carbon riser (but the Biscuit worked fantastically); the same rest on my BowTech Assassin works fine. No frills, but gets the job done. I think it may be more in "snob factor" than any real problems with the R.A.K. items standard on the Diamond/BowTech bows. Probably same-same for Bear, Hoyt, et. al.
 

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Sorry if I'm a little new to this, I like the specs of the bowtech fuel but at $100 more expensive is the cam upgrade worth that for a bow that I'll still need to change the rest and sight on (same rest and sight as the diamond infinite edge pro) ? Again I'm just getting in to this so sorry for the lack of knowledge
 

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I've just heard the sight is a pain to get tuned and the rest as well as being noisy. want it as quiet as possible for hunting.
 

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Don't over think it man. I am almost 40 years old I have been bowhunting since I was 13 and have been shooting a bow as far back as I can remember. Don't rush to buy anything just yet. Like the gentlemen above posted go try them out. Even if the bow you like is expensive check the internet, AT Classifieds etc. A bow's fit is all about who the shooter is. Price is a consideration but, not the biggest concern. I would find the right bow first then worry about the price. If you find a bow that you like better for $100 more then guess what it is worth it. What you don't want to do is just buy a bow and then get frustrated with it because it isn't right for you, then you will spend even more money buying another bow that you really enjoy shooting. I have owned Mathews, Hoyt, PSE, Bear, Bowtech, Martin, Whisper Creek (no longer in business), and one of the best bows I ever shot and wish that wouldn't have sold was a Diamond Rapture that I bought fully setup for $250 used not a high dollar bow and some people probably would hate it but, it just felt right in my hands and I killed a lot of deer with it but, I thought I needed the next best thing. Now that I have a little more disposable income as I have gotten older I bought a Mathews Z7 in 2010 brand new after I shot a lot of bows and it is perfect and I still have it and don't think I will sell it. I have owned a few bows since buying it but, now all I have is my Z7, a PSE DNA SP, and my recurve. I will play with my wife's bow too cause that 45# draw weight is just fun to shoot I could hang up side down by my feet and shoot that thing. By the way I am still in the market anybody got an old Diamond Rapture for sale??????
 

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Like others said, shoot everything you can. If you find that the $800 dollar bow "feels" best to you but out of range, look on here. Might not find the deal you're looking for right away, but it will come. As for the other gear, shop around, spread it out. I started out with a Hoyt, literally no idea what model, $5 GT Arrows and an old release that a buddy gave me. I think all in all I spent around $350 for the whole set up. That was 7 years ago. I've upgraded since, but it has been gradual. My wife just got into it last year and we did the same thing. Don't go overboard buying the latest and greatest everything, you'll go broke and still shoot like crap. Get what's comfortable for you, both feel and price, and shoot like crazy. Also, factor in a lesson or two. I shot for two years before I set foot in the woods. There are plenty of deals on the classifieds here, find something you like and get it. If it doesn't work well you can always sell it for close to what you paid.

This is an awesome sport and a lot of good people. Find a club around you and join. "Most" people will be more than happy to help and show you the ropes.

Welcome to AT too!
 

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Once you decide on a bow you need to have your eyes checked for dominance. You want to shoot dominant eye not dominant hand. You also need to be measured for draw length w actual bow n chosen shooting method
 

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I'm not going to get into a "brand" battle on here but want to give my little bit of advice from a different approach. Like everyone says, shoot a few of them and find what u like and don't like about each one then decide what's more important to you when using it for hunting.

Now, how much are going to use it? Do u hunt a lot or are u just now getting into it? A lot of weekend warriors who don't hunt much spend all this money to get what they think is the latest and greatest and really barely know and probably could've saved some $. Technology in bows has come a long way but it's the shooter that makes the difference.

If u plan on having it forever and money isn't an issue, then buy what u want. But if you're on a budget, there are a lot of slightly used bows for sale on here that come up every day and some good people that will steer you in the right direction. Some bows that are 6 or 7 years old that have barely been shot are just as good or better than some of the new stuff being sold.

My point is, don't just think you have to have the"latest" and "greatest" because of what others think. Since its your first bow, and you don't know how long you'll keep it or hunt with it, and If you don't want to "break the bank", weigh all your options. You may be happier with an older bare bow, that you can outfit yourself with accessories you like versus buying someone else's expensive packaged deal.

Are you confused now?
 

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Know what your budget is and allow $150 or so for sight/rest/string loop etc plus
$100+ or so for arrows and target points. Then go to a pro shop and shoot bows in your price range and decide.
You will be money ahead doing it right the first time.
 

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Best you can possibly do is let the bow pick you. BE BLIND TO THE BRAND!! Don't shoot one or another because a buddy said it was a good brand. Try EVERYTHING and choose the one that fits you best.
 

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All of the major manufactures make an 'entry level' bow that would be good for hunting/3D. Two things will affect which make/model you go with... 1) your budget 2) how it meets your specific physical needs.

Budget will be the major dictator, and will instantly limit you to a certain brand/tier of bows. But don't let that turn you off. My first bow was a Mission Riot that I bought 'hunt ready' from a dealer for $800 - included arrows, field tips, rest, sight, quiver, stabilizer, release, and hardcase. It was a great starting point for me in both terms of becoming an archer and bowhunting. Now 3 years later I upgraded virtually every piece of archery equipment I own and constantly try/buy new things (much to my pocketbook and wife's detriment... lol).
 

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Buy just enough bow to get the job done until you figure out rather you actually like hunting or not.
Dont forget, a bow is only a single part of the gear you might take with you. Be sure you have enough money to spend on all the other stuff you might want to buy... i.e. treestand, boots, camo, ect....

Id save the couple hundred extra you might spend on a higher end bow and get the base line Bear or PSA. They get the job done without breaking the bank
 

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I'd shoot a few of PSE's mainline bows. They usually include decent accessories in their ready to hunt packages. I have a Stinger that I use as my back up bow and also for bow fishing, and it has proved to be a very good bow for the money.
 
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