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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i am going to buy my first bow this year and it has to be a PSE because it is the closest dealer. I can pull back 70 pounds, and was wondering sugestions for bows and set ups. I was thinking of madness, or brute.
 

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i would recommand something cheap and easy, along the $300 price mark.
stinger would be a great choice.

since it's your first bow, something tells me that you're not gonna keep it for more than a year. after you've gained some experience, you will want something that fits you better.

it's the same reason as buying cars. never go all out and buy a porsche or lambo for your first car. save that for later.
 

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i would recommand something cheap and easy, along the $300 price mark.
stinger would be a great choice.

since it's your first bow, something tells me that you're not gonna keep it for more than a year. after you've gained some experience, you will want something that fits you better.

it's the same reason as buying cars. never go all out and buy a porsche or lambo for your first car. save that for later.
yeah...what he said
 

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that said about the bows, let's get down to the accessories.

for hunting, a wrist strap trigger release is a must. for target, a thumb release.
don't go for back-tension. save that for later.

as for the rest, wisker biscuit all the way.
with that you can focus on plain shooting, instead of complicated tuning and adjusting and arrows falling off the rest. a containment drop-away works as well, but wisker has one other advantage.
unlike dropaways, the wisker is in contact with your arrow all the way, meaning that any bowhand torque is going to be amplified. (mistakes will seem more obvious)
this might not be what you want in a tornament, but it'll teach you how to hold a bow properly
you need to start off with the best form possible, since changing them down the road is going to be hard.

a bowsling is a must, blazer fletching is a must (because of wisker biscuit), stabilizer is optional, but it does help with your aiming.

choose a micro-adjustable sight (makes life a lot easier), and pick something good.
when you change bows you can take it off and put it on ur new bow.

any other questions?
 

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that said about the bows, let's get down to the accessories.

for hunting, a wrist strap trigger release is a must. for target, a thumb release.
don't go for back-tension. save that for later.

as for the rest, wisker biscuit all the way.
with that you can focus on plain shooting, instead of complicated tuning and adjusting and arrows falling off the rest. a containment drop-away works as well, but wisker has one other advantage.
unlike dropaways, the wisker is in contact with your arrow all the way, meaning that any bowhand torque is going to be amplified. (mistakes will seem more obvious)this might not be what you want in a tornament, but it'll teach you how to hold a bow properly
you need to start off with the best form possible, since changing them down the road is going to be hard.

a bowsling is a must, blazer fletching is a must (because of wisker biscuit), stabilizer is optional, but it does help with your aiming.

choose a micro-adjustable sight (makes life a lot easier), and pick something good.
when you change bows you can take it off and put it on ur new bow.

any other questions?
Dude it is not a advantage. Why do you think we dont shoot overdraws any more. It will make you shoot acording to the rest not what the correct form in get real. For starting out you want forgiving not unforgiving.
 

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Well now that REFLEXDEFLEX has explained that your probably not going to have the bow for more than a year I just have some tips for you. You say that you can pull back 70 pounds but just make sure you turn the bow down to 60 when you first start shooting because it will be easier to shoot and pulling to much weight right off the bat leads to bad shooting form. Just take it slow and get a local pro or experienced shooter to check on your form every week for a couple months- he or she can help you to find errors in your form or possible damages or incorrect set-up on your bow that you may not recognize as a begginer. And one more thing, welcome to the world of archery!:darkbeer:
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Ok this will be my first hunting bow not shooting bow. This year i did not feel that confident with my 1990 hand me down Jennings bow (not good enough grouping). I was thinking of the 09 Bowmadness to the Brute for price range.
 

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Here's an advice: don't think, try.
You'll never know what's best for you just by looking at the specs. You'll get pretty close if you know what you're doing, but never right on.
Go down to the shop, ask them for a test bow. Draw it and tell for yourself
 

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I can see the advice about getting a lower priced bow in anticipation of getting a better bow down the road. I'm just now getting back into bows after about 15 years. I had to buy a new one because my little ol' Brown Bear special wouldn't cut it. Personally I went all out on my first bow because I knew what I wanted. I also know this bow will last me for probably the next 10 -15 years if I take care of it. I didn't want to spend 4-5 hundred bucks then turn around to sell it next year and spend another 7 hundred plus bucks.

I don't contradict what these guys are saying at all. I just wanted to chime in with my 2 cents.

Good Luck!
 

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If you can pull 70 pounds comfortably, pull it 50 times and see how comfortable that feels.

If you're going to hunt you can get away with using a heavier bow because you won't be pulling it that much. But if you intend to shoot target you might want to experiment a bit before buying a 70# bow.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Right now i am shooting a 90's Jennings bow that maxes out at 65 to tune it in i will start at 60 though to get use to the new bow
 
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