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Discussion Starter #1
This is my first post on this forum. I don't know what has taken me so long to do this. Here is the deal. I have thought of bow hunting for years, and this year we did not draw elk tags for rifle, but decided we can go general bow season. I am a native Oregonian. I have played around with a cheap bow when I was a kid, but nothing serious.

Bow hunting is in a few weeks. I need help with bow and gear selection and other tips/words of wisdom. I know that time is not on my side, but hunting is my passion, I really want to get into bow hunting. I need a bow now to get a couple hundred practice rounds.

:moose: - - - - - :archer:

Here are a few of some starter questions:
new or used?
must have equipment?
arrow type? quantity?
broadhead types?
accessories needed?
calls needed? type?


Be nice! I know experience is needed and time is short, but I want to get my feet wet.
 

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Well if you are gonna try to do it in that time frame best advice I can give is find a bow that fits you fast and start practicing. Practice a lot. Have your local pro shop rig you up with some decent weight arrows and some fixed broadheads. Just go with they're recommendations, brand doesn't matter. New or used doesn't matter. Just go to your local shop, have them measure you and fit a bow to you. They should be able to get you shooting pretty good at 10-20 yards, then go home and practice and try to dial in your distances. Most important accessory you'll need is a range finder.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
got a range finder for my birthday this year!
 

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1)Go to a pro shop with a thousand bucks. 2)Expect to spend it all. 3)Tell the most honest-looking guy you see what your situation is. 4)Buy a bow that feels good and let honest-looking guy set you up. 5)Have him help you get your pins set. 6)Go home and practice. 7)Go kill an elk and have fun.
 

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Ya he's not kidding on the $1000 thing. You don't need the most expensive bow out there, but all the other stuff will add up quick.
 

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I only just picked up a bow back in march and I already have more $ than I care to say invested in bow hunting
 

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Discussion Starter #8
some people go to hawaii, others go hunting..... the money spent on gear for a bow will continue to give back year after year....

so if I buy used. what is something I need too look out for or concerns to have? strings?
 

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My advice

1) Put money back in pocket....find less addicting more cost effective hobby.....like building models.....
2) If #1 not an option, withdraw money from kids college fund...buy good equipment and practice a lot....prepare to sleep on couch when wife finds out :)
 

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You can try and find a used bow at a decent price..but if bow hunting doesn't end up being your thing..your not out a lot.
Diamond has some GREAT mid priced bows...that brand new will run ya $350-$550.
They come with sights rest and quiver. The rests generally suck..so plan on at least $60 for a decent one. Dozen good carbon arrows can be found here for $50-$75. I use carbon express torrid mechanical broadheads...$12 for 3 @ Walmart .
So to go with a new....solid set up...around $550-$700.
Id go used just starting out. Heck..my best buddy has a 2011 Hoyt Rampage completely set up..case and all..for sale for $350.
He bought a new Hoyt this year. That Rampage is flawless and a helluva bow.

Sent from my LG-L38C using Tapatalk 2
 

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Buy used but get a brand new string and cable set so you know what you have and can trust it. (Not a Zebra - 60x, JBK, Winner's Choice - all mainly agree these are good)

Get it tuned at a bow shop by a pro tech

Take a lesson or two from said bow tech (for form)

Practice as much as you can with time remaining

Be realistic about your abilities and shoot within them if you get a shot at harvesting an elk

Every minute you aren't practicing, learn as much as you can about the region you'll be hunting

Take a target and your bow and throw it in the truck, go scout, look for poop and water (wallows)

practice some more while you're out there

Practice stress shots, do 20 jumping jacks then shoot your bow seconds after while your heart is still pounding

Practice some more

If you are consistently shooting somewhere other than where you're aiming, take it to the bow tech
and have them tweak it.

Practice some more

Don't forget to shoot with your broad heads instead of field points...there is a chance they will fly differently.

new or used? - USED but new strings
must have equipment? - Rangefinder, release, scent eliminator spray, good boots, camp, arrows, calls, binocs
arrow type? quantity? - Depends COMPLETELY on your setup, can't buy them until you know your bow, draw weight, draw length, etc. match the stick to the bow
broadhead types? - Best to stick with a fixed, cut on contact broad head and make sure they fly the same as your field points, or at least predictably
accessories needed? - Your release is the single most important thing to NOT FORGET - nothing happens without it.
calls needed? type? - Get multiple cow calls, mouth calls (practice) a hoochie mama, and maybe a cowgirl (hoochie and cowgirl are hard to mess up) only use a bugle if you can do it correctly
 

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some people go to hawaii, others go hunting..... the money spent on gear for a bow will continue to give back year after year....

so if I buy used. what is something I need too look out for or concerns to have? strings?
The main thing getting started is getting a bow that fits you on the draw length. If it doesn;t fit you, proper form and getting accurate with it will be 100 times harder.This should be your number one priority getting started in my opinion.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Great replies all!!!

After a night of bow elk hunting dreams, I wake up to all these replies. I intend to go to a shop after work today and see what they have as far as a used set-up. hold some bows, find my draw lenth, pounds I can pull (probably #70 is good for elk?) I don't mind the money side of things, I can see it "paying off" with years of future hunts and the stories that come with them.

here is another crazy question. I am left handed, right eye dominate, so I rifle shoot from the right. Does this mean I should also use a right handed bow? This is what I assumed.
 

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Great replies all!!!

After a night of bow elk hunting dreams, I wake up to all these replies. I intend to go to a shop after work today and see what they have as far as a used set-up. hold some bows, find my draw lenth, pounds I can pull (probably #70 is good for elk?) I don't mind the money side of things, I can see it "paying off" with years of future hunts and the stories that come with them.

here is another crazy question. I am left handed, right eye dominate, so I rifle shoot from the right. Does this mean I should also use a right handed bow? This is what I assumed.
Yup you might have to go that route im right handed but left eye dominant so I shoot a lefty with todays bows you could probly be ok with 60#s you dnt want to start too heavy and youll be surprised how hard the draw can be to start with and how fast it gets easy you'll be hooked in no time
 

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Bow
Sight
Rest
Release
Arrows

Those are likely the biggest and most important items that will make or break your set up. All sorts of other jazz you'll need, but it isn't as crucial in my opinion.

The bow-Go shoot several bow from several manufactures. The bow will pick you. Trust me, you'll know fast if you like the feel of a bow. Keep shooting them till you really fall in love. Then shoot some more & see if that one you liked the most still is the "best" one. Everyone here will have there favorite makes and models, and to me, that matters not. I shoot PSE, but the new G5 Prime Impact, with the Parallel Cam system is amazingly smooth & no body has this innovation, said to be the biggest innovation in our sport in 20 years. I shot it, amazingly smooth, just doesn't set up to me like I want, so I'm waiting till other models come out. Hard to find the G5 Prime in shops I hear. Worth a look IF your shop has them, as all bows are worth a shot or 2 during your search for your first big bow purchase.

You'll shoot right handed. So, you'll have plenty of models and makes to shoot.

Arrows-carbon-Cabelas Stalker Extreme-as good as anything out there & you'll save a few bucks. Blazer vanes-few will argue that this is at the top of the food chain when it comes to hunting vanes

Release-wrist release using a buckle system-I've found velcro gives & is less accurate, as it gives, stretches & is harder to get velcroed on into the same postion. I've used several over the decades-Scott wrist releases make a great line-but be sure to check out some of the offerings from other manufactures that have the buckle. I've seen some nice innovations out there this year.

Sights-there are several great ones. If I was starting, I'd want one with several pins, maybe 7 pins. Sight in at 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 A Spot Hog might be worth looking at. I shoot a HHA 5019, which is a single pin Dial sight, so you end up with being able to shoot every yardage on my set up from 20-80 yards, pretty popular sight & very accurate AND top notch manufacturing.


Rest-I'd get a drop away. There are all sorts of great ones out there, new and old ideas. I've tried and used most between myself and my kids over the decades. I'm currently using Vaportrails Limbdriver, they have some great innovations & killer customer service IF you ever need it.

This is a good description of how the vaportrail delivers the arrow.

Be sure to read about all these different catagories, as there is a wealth of information already here via the search feature.

Enjoy the process & get shooting!
 

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I'm right handed...and left eye dominate. Have to shoot rifles left handed...but strangely shoot bows right handed. I couldn't pull diddly left handed.

As for draw weight on elk...50# will do the job..but check the state where u plan to hunt..they may have min draw weight rules.

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Discussion Starter #17
well, I dropped the cash on my new set up. I bought a Bear Legion. adjusted to 65#, 27.5 draw. got a dozen Easton carbon arrows, practice tips, a hoochie mama, case, tru-fire hurricane release and still deciding on some tips that are legal here in Oregon. just shot a couple different bows. probably rushed it a little, but I'm happy. I really need practice. raked the string across my forearm twice today and I have a huge bruised knot like a tennis ball.... dumb idiot!!! :) the sales guy asked if I would be interested in a pad and I declined and told him it would be harder to change my ways if I was protected. I hope that was the right call. now I need some bales of straw and some cardboard!

my bow came with a five pin set up. what ranges should I set them at? 10-20-30-50-70?
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Thanks!!!
 
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