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Discussion Starter #1
So I know if you have a 3-fixed blade head and 3 vanes, you align them to help with accuracy (or so that is the assumption), but if you have a 2 or 4 blade and 3 vanes, I am guessing it does not matter at all, and really just make sure your broadheads all are positioned the same way...thoughts?
 

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It makes no difference if the heads are orientated with your vanes. Now if your shooting long distance and you have done all the micro tuning for shooting long distance then you do want all your heads to be the same between arrows. This will havevall arriws with same reaction. Again most do not shoot well enough for any of this to matter.
 

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it really makes no difference at all, especially because the arrow spins, so there is no aerodynamic benefit.

with that said, however, when using 2 blade fixed heads, i align the main blade to be vertical when nocked. i use hotmelt glue for my inserts, so it only takes a couple seconds.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
That's what I was thinking. I'm consistent at 60 yards with broadheads and field points. I was just checking cause any issues I want to make sure they are from me and not due to inconsistencies with my equipment

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Discussion Starter #5
it really makes no difference at all, especially because the arrow spins, so there is no aerodynamic benefit.

with that said, however, when using 2 blade fixed heads, i align the main blade to be vertical when nocked. i use hotmelt glue for my inserts, so it only takes a couple seconds.
Why vertical? Any reason or just personal preference?


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Why vertical? Any reason or just personal preference?
compounds have more vertical arrow flex at the shot unlike a trad bow off fingers needing the horizontal flex(paradox) to clear the non shoot through riser. so by aligning it verically, it is cleaner at launch.

eric could probably explain it better
 

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It's an old wive's tale. Nothing more.
 

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I have never had to worry about a 3 blade as they always fly great. I have had to do tuning on 2 & 4 blade heads. I've basically shot some model Rocky Mountain 3 blade since they came on the market in the mid 70s (44 years now). Ironheads currently. My kids/brother use Rocky 3 blade Premiums. 5 of us use Rockies. Pictured are Rocky 3 blade kills by me, son, G-son & Daughter..
 

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BIG FRANK....
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I always align my fletchings to my BH for years.....It makes a difference to me..
 

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I look at this way. If the broadhead didn't make a difference, then why when shoot an with three blades and no fletchings the arrow flies erratic, why?, Because the blades act like fletching and want to take over..So it makes more sense to align everything. Some may not tell the difference, but to say it doesn't matter is a bit off to. EVERYTHING matters when you want the most out of your equipment.. op if you are having something with your groups at long range, then take three and align them and three without. Shoot your longest distance and measure your group sizes. You just might be surprised. I do any and everything that when add something to my setup and shots. If you tune everything by say a number scale so to speak, whatever you do adding a point here and there then 96 % being perfect setup is better than 90% , so why not gain every little advantage you can. I would think as a hunter an eight of an inch or quarter doesn't matter, but when you start shooting X's on a Vegas face alot of things you wouldn't do for hunting will change as the mindset of wanting better and tighter poi changes. It comes down to two things. 1. How well you shoot 2. Does it matter to you. But remember,EVERTHING matters, no matter how small it may seem or who says it doesn't.
 

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Haha, it makes zero difference. A broadhead will plane without fletching as the weight is at the front and nothing to stabilise the rear.

If you think it makes a difference and it's for your confidence, then that is the only reason to do it.
 

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Reckoning 35 for 3D, RealmX for hunt, PSE SupraFocusXL for spot . Axcel, ARC release, Victory.
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I think that only place where this can be solved is a wind tunnel and smoke to see turbulence What BR does and how it affects at vanes steering. Cant see it does but science is in aerodynamics with this thing.

But If U believe it does affect, then by all means.. do alignment.
Its more between everybody’s mind than nothing. When U feel comfrtable, thats most important...
 

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Jim Burnworth launches his fine at long range not oriented any. I haven’t really found it to make much difference. But I always aligned mine, looked cleaner and seemed to have less noise that way. I typically shoot a 2 blade or 2 with bleeders. I always have the main blade sitting angled 10 to 4. Normally shoot all the same colored fletching so it’s just a easy reference in case I get in a hurry and can’t feel the index on my nock.
 

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I align the blades with the fletching. If you do so you can place arrows in the quiver so that neither the blades or the fletching touches the other arrows.
 

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So I know if you have a 3-fixed blade head and 3 vanes, you align them to help with accuracy (or so that is the assumption), but if you have a 2 or 4 blade and 3 vanes, I am guessing it does not matter at all, and really just make sure your broadheads all are positioned the same way...thoughts?
old wifes tale, use to do this my self but it makes no diffrence except mentaly
 

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I align the blades with the fletching. If you do so you can place arrows in the quiver so that neither the blades or the fletching touches the other arrows.
sounds like the best reason so far
 

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Randy Ulmer has a good video about it, he basically says the alignment helps but due to the fact the heads are oriented the same so they have a consistent launching point, the vanes lining up makes no difference.

Makes sense


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I have not done testing extensively but I do know that back in the day (‘90s) it did make a difference on how I oriented my broadheads. A misaligned one would fly like a flag in the wind. Looking back I see that it was due to one of a couple reasons. 1.) my bow wasn’t as tuned as I thought or 2.) we used lower weight broadheads to decrease overall weight of arrow(to help with lack of speed of older bows) and used large (5” feathers) on the rear end to “guide” the broadheads. In actuality it just made our FOC % smaller and the whole arrow was out of tune. The ‘arrow’dynamics came into play with the BH was not lined up because it did cause air turbulence (even though slight) because the front and the rear of the arrow was trying to steer. With modern tech and not worrying about speed it isn’t a problem... except mentally for some. Just my $0.02


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No it doesn't make difference. Cause there's like anywhere from 26 to 31" between the two on most arrows. It's not like the blade of the broadhead can cut a wind channel 30" long for the vane to travel through. Cause wether they are aligned or not they are both going to effect their end of the arrow how ever they were going to effect it. So what's more important is to get the 2 ends of the arrow perfectly in line with each other at the shot so they don't have to fight each other. And the best way to do that is to bare shaft tune your bow. If you can get an arrow leaving perfectly straight to where a arrow with no vanes can hit a bullseye at 20,30,60 yards then we know for a fact the arrow is leaving perfect. See if a broadhead tipped arrow leaves a bow say like this / then those air grabbing blades of the broadhead will try and pull the arrow right. Just like when you stick your hand out car window when driving. If you plane your hand up it will pull your arm up. Now the vanes will fight the blades to straighten the arrow out and it's still possible to get good groups with your BH. But when your vanes have to work to fight your blades or straighten your arrow it will cost you valuable KE. And arrows can't gain KE after the shot they can only loose it. So the less we lose in flight the more we have when we get to the animal. And the higher the KE better change of pass through. So if you can and you want optimal BH flight. Get that thing BS tuned.

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Randy Ulmer has a good video about it, he basically says the alignment helps but due to the fact the heads are oriented the same so they have a consistent launching point, the vanes lining up makes no difference.

Makes sense


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I agree with that and even more so with a two blade.
 
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