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I am inquiring as to what the difference is between fletching arrows right hylical or left, other than obviously the direction of spin. I am going to start fletching my own arrows and they are left hylical currently, but I am curious as to what a right fletch would change. Then if you throw into the equation doing strait offset, in reality isn't what you end up with is a sort of hylical fletch, since the idea of offsetting is to create spin? Just trying to educate myself a little. THANKS!!!
 

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Helical or offset fletch causes the arrow to spin, but more importantly (I think) it increases drag which moves the center of pressure back on the arrow. This results in a more stable arrow.

If fletching with feathers make sure that you fletch with the right feathers in the right clamps.
 

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HY



make spin the arrow has two effects:

create a little more drag very little
and make it turn up to 100 rp S so 6000 RPM

this does increase stability

another thing
the direction ( left or right ) is just to clean the rest for the bottom vane

if you shoot a compound with a drop away rest ie no problem the direction


Years ago I made test with right and left helical in function of wind direction, this had the effect to change the group place in target, the group size was just a bit better if you turn against the wind.



all the best to you

phil
 

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The only difference between right and left hand feathers, is which wing they came off of. Helical clamps have a twist to match the natural curve of the feathers. Right hand clamp for right wing feathers, and left hand clamp for left wing feathers. Vanes can certainly be fletched either way, or with a straight clamp with a right or left offset.

Personally, I use a right helical clamp, and vanes.

The only advantage I've found, is when using screw in points. They tend to stay tight on a right hand helical. A left hand spin will be loosening the points as they hit the target.

maitre91,
Interesting theory on the wind direction. But, aren't you turning against the wind in either rotation direction? One from the top, and the other from the bottom?
 

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Rhino

you are right the shaft is turning against the wind bottom vane up and top vane down

What I did noticed was when the top vane go against the wind it was slightly better, why , I am not sure

may be the arrow in flight is falling down so the apparent wind from the view of arrow ( it is not true of course because in fact the arrow is in line with the wind )
the wind has a side and an up composante.

may be

once time I did spoke about that with vladimir Escheev he made the same tests when he was testing for Beman arrows

I also spoke of that with Dee Wilde , he plan to shoot throught a tunnel where he could have fans to simulate side wind.
I did not know if he succed with his tests.



all the best

phil
 

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Here is a theory about why things will be different with wind in different directions. Please note, this is just a guess.

Okay, let's say that the arrow is spinning clockwise (viewed from the back) and that the wind is coming from left to right. Because of the Magnus effect, the shaft will have an upward force.\

Reverse the wind direction, or the spin direction and the force will be downward.

Of course the amount of this force is very small, maybe unmeasureable.
 
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