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I've fletched aluminum arrows for decades but I'm new to this whole carbon thing. I was just taking some vanes off some new Blackhawk Vapor ACC type arrows with a razor blade like I've always done and on the first one I took off a small sliver of carbon. I was holding the razor blade at an angle almost flat to the arrow. I started using the blade at a 90 to the arrow and more or less scraped the rest of the vanes off. Is that the way to do it or is there an easier way?

Also the carbon is discolored after removing the fletching, is that normal?

How much of a sliver can you take off before the arrow should be tossed out? This was smaller than a thin hair.

Thanks for any advice.
 

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I use Gold Tip Arrows because you can remove old Vanes with Acetone. There is no damage from scraping the shaft. I use a fine Scotch Bright pad to buff the shaft returning it to original luster.

If you have deeply gouged or scraped the shaft removing Vanes I would recommend discarding the shaft ( very minor scrapes are ok ). If you cannot buff the scrape off with fine Scotch Bright...discard the shaft. It is not worth sending an Arrow through your hand / arm.
 

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If I get a splinter, the arrow is tossed...Not worth saving a few bucks to end up in surgery!

I don't use a razor blade, just a decently sharp knife with a big handle (for better control). I find that a razor blade is too sharp and not enough control for working on carbon shafts!

I use more of a scraping action to remove the vanes rather than "cutting" them...Find that this way I'm less likely to dig in to the shaft!
 

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I use a sharp knife to cut the vanes as close to the "valley" as I can. Then I just run the knife back and forth over the remaining plastic until it's gone. It's time consuming, but I have yet to damage an arrow this way. You can use acetone to get most glues, which will also remove the vanes, however a lot of the quick setting glues will have adhesion issues if you use acetone in your prep work. I will usually use acetone to make sure all the old glue is gone then let the shafts sit while I boil a pot of water. I put the rear of the shaft in the water for about 10 seconds then place in front of a fan to cool and dry. By the time I'm done with a whole dozen, the first shaft is usually ready to go in the jig. I let each vane sit for 3 min in the jig before rotating to the next one and use a cut off q-tip to wipe off any extra glue.
 

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Acetone must be removed from the shaft otherwise the glue will not adhere properly. Rinsing the shaft in warm / hot water is a good idea. Wipe the shaft with toilet paper or a paper towel to check for residue.
 

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A dull utility knife works best.then
You're not as likely to cut into the arrow.
 

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I use a sharp utility knife, and just know the angle to hold it at. Then I scrape back and forth to get the excess glue off. Set the end of the shaft into a can of acetone for about 20 seconds and everything is gone and the arrow looks brand new. I must say though, that I ran into one arrow that always has a sliver of carbon come off with the vane. Easton Lightspeeds.
 

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I use a Stanley Knife, they make a curved blade that works well. The Pro at the shop gave me the tip. Also after all the vane has been removed I use a damp cloth with Ajax powder sprinkled on it to clean the shaft. Rinse off residual let dry and away you go.
 

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Do right helical and left helical shoot differently?
 

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A dull utility knife works best.then
You're not as likely to cut into the arrow.
Been using the same old pocket knife which is quite dull forever, never damage the arrows.
Being a chemist, I'll say that acetone is volatile enough that's it's gone without worrying about it
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I use a sharp utility knife, and just know the angle to hold it at. Then I scrape back and forth to get the excess glue off. Set the end of the shaft into a can of acetone for about 20 seconds and everything is gone and the arrow looks brand new. I must say though, that I ran into one arrow that always has a sliver of carbon come off with the vane. Easton Lightspeeds.
DId you have any problems with the lightspeeds or did you toss them? The first 2 I gouged pretty bad and I tossed them, on one other I had a real fine thread about 3 inches long that came up. I almost didn't even notice it.

Thanks everybody for the help. I did the kid's Victory Jr's with no problems using the same technique as I have with aluminums but these Blackhawks seem to be a whole different experience. The scraping with the blade purpendicular seems to work much better.
 

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Knife...no razor....there will be some discoloration where the old vane was, that's not a problem and normal as long as you don't cut into the shaft...

wipe with Alcohol...fletch away....
 
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