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I've purchased some Easton X7 shafts spined appropriately for my Gillo G2 setup, according to the Easton charts for my draw length and weight. I'm shooting off of a Spigarelli Zero-Tolerance wire arrow rest with a Beiter plunger.

I'm a novice archer but I would like to eventually compete indoors at 18m distances. I don't see myself shooting outdoors regularly so I'm not worried about getting them wet or dirty. After watching umpteen YouTube videos and reading many online articles, I got the sense that many competitive archers use thicker arrows for line-cutting in the indoor, wind-free environment. I went with the X7's because they're cheaper than carbon and top archers such as Brady Ellison speak highly of them.

However, I'm wondering what the experts here would recommend in terms of fletching. I find this an extremely confusing this topic, likely because there are so many factors involved. Do most competitive archers shoot with feathers or vanes indoors? What length? Are spin wings overkill? Etc, etc.

One guy I spoke to at the local archery shop told me to install 3" feathers (straight with about 3 degrees offset) and that's what I've been learning to shoot with so far. Another archer at the range advocates using Blazer vanes (which by the way, the archery shop guy scoffed at).

I don't mind spending a little extra money but I sort of want to settle on a fletching that I can improve with going forward and grow with and, ultimately, achieve higher scores.

Really appreciate any advice given! Hope everyone had a great XMas!
 

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3" or 4" feathers work great and are what you usually see on fat aluminum shafts when used by top indoor recurve shooters. Spin wings are usually only used on skinny outdoor shafts, though there are spin wing models in larger sizes suitable for large indoor arrows - you just hardly see anyone using them. You definitely do not want to use a relatively tall and stiff vane like a Blazer on anything but a compound setup.

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Luck -

Pretty much doesn't matter.

Big feathers with a lot of helical will be easier to see in the target, especially if you pick the right colors.
Smaller vanes are usually cheaper, "may" be easier to fletch, and will usually last longer than feathers.
(The only catch might be using vanes that are too big and therefore too heavy, especially when shooting aluminum arrows with NIBBs.)

Almost anything will give you more than enough stabilization for indoor shooting.

Yes, I've used both and currently use vanes, but miss seeing the arrows in the target...

If you're new, I'd just use 3' parabolic feathers and see how things go.

Viper1 out.
 

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Pretty much doesn't matter.
Good advice, and it applies to about 90% of the questions posted here on ArcheryTalk. :)

Long time ago when he was in University and I was coaching the university archery club, a friend and I did a serious, statistically correctly done study on fletch size. He was taking a Stats course and this was one of his term projects. He was at the time a top level shooter (member of the Canadian team, competed at the World Champs). He was averaging practice rounds in the high 280s on the 10-ring indoor target.

I made up 2 dozen of his arrows in 6 sets of 4 different types of fletch. If I recall correctly, there were 3" feathers, Spin Wings, 2 sizes hard plastics (45 and 60mm K), and 2 sizes soft plastics (I think 2.25 and 3.25"). He then went and shot 10 rounds of 30 arrows with each set over the course of several weeks. Same indoor range, no changes to the equipment, random selection of fletch type for each session. 1914 aluminums, around 27" I think.

Final results showed no statistical difference among any of the fletch, except the large soft plastics which were definitely slightly lower in score. Maybe the weight, maybe the rest clearance, don't know.

(By the way, he got a B+ on the report, and missed the A because we couldn't figure out how to make this a "blind" test where the archer wouldn't know which arrows he was shooting and thereby somehow influence the test results.)



My own preference for indoor fletching is 4" shield feathers on any arrow 19XX ("standard" carbon) or thicker, and 3" shield feathers on 18XX or thinner, and that's only because big feathers on skinny shafts, and small feathers on thicker shafts just looks silly. And I like the shield shape because it looks cool.
 
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