Archery Talk Forum banner

1 - 20 of 38 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,696 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Last August I bought my home, which includes 18.5 acres. It was a bit too late to plant a food plot, so I decided this year I'd put one in. I decided on whitetail institute tall tine tubers, which for my area I'd the first 2 weeks of August. My neighbor is a great guy and agree to remove some old stumps and disc the area I want to plant. He decided he felt like doing the work today. Should be an awesome little food plot. Will fertilize in the next few weeks and then grade before planting in early August.
20190609_145355.jpg
20190609_145353.jpg
20190609_145134.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,696 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
No idea why 2 of the 3 pics posted sideways. Feel free to fix, if anyone knows how
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,696 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I'll put in 19 19 19 fertilizer. That's what all my neighbors have told me works best in the soil in this area.

A local farmer rotates corn and soybeans on me (a 3.5 acre field on the west side of my property) and neighbors to both sides. This year is soybeans :) He was out yesterday spraying and expects to be planting this week.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
419 Posts
Ask the farmer who farms your patch where to get a soil sample done (local coop most likely). Basically if your soil pH isn’t within a certain range then your fertilizer won’t become available to the plants. FYI lime is inexpensive and you should only have to put it on every few years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,945 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
624 Posts
Do a soil sample first. Very easy and cheap to do. Fertilizing now serves no purpose other than feed the weeds that will come up by time August gets here. Wait for all the weeds and grasses to get about 8 to 10 inches tall, because all the discing did was bring up more weed seed, spray with gly and 2 4d.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,616 Posts
I think I'd want something in that soil so it doesn't turn in to weeds or worse yet wash out my top soil during heavy summer rains. You could toss buckwheat/clover out now and throw and mow your tall tines in august.

Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk
 

·
Livin' in a van....
Joined
·
8,476 Posts
make sure your soil is right for the food you want to plant. A soil sample is well worth the $30 you'll spend on it.

Last year I had a neighbor no till corn into an old pasture field that we'd sprayed. I would have taken pictures, but then there'd be documentation as to how sad the stand of corn was.

If it was woods or pasture you're probably going to have to lime the schneikes out of it for a couple years (usually takes 6 months for the lime to take effect).

The first year or 2, I'd recommend taking your time and putting in something universal that the deer will eat and that will also help the organic matter in the soil. Oats, wheat, and/or driller radishes are hard to beat, especially early season. Plus they'll build your soil up until you get to the PH that will work for some of your more "sexy" plots.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,941 Posts
looks good tye. The one year I put in imperial no plow, but I did plow. The brassicas lasted well into the winter and were a big hit with the deer. The nice thing about brassicas is that the deer leave them alone until a hard frost makes them sweet which times out well with the bow season. They also sell a blend of winter greens that are mostly brassicas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
513 Posts
make sure your soil is right for the food you want to plant. A soil sample is well worth the $30 you'll spend on it.

Last year I had a neighbor no till corn into an old pasture field that we'd sprayed. I would have taken pictures, but then there'd be documentation as to how sad the stand of corn was.

If it was woods or pasture you're probably going to have to lime the schneikes out of it for a couple years (usually takes 6 months for the lime to take effect).

The first year or 2, I'd recommend taking your time and putting in something universal that the deer will eat and that will also help the organic matter in the soil. Oats, wheat, and/or driller radishes are hard to beat, especially early season. Plus they'll build your soil up until you get to the PH that will work for some of your more "sexy" plots.
This. Spend the $20 to have a soil sample done. Then plant and fertilize based on what will grow best in your conditions. Farmer Joe down the road's soil conditions may be completely different to yours. In the long run this approach will save you money.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
857 Posts
Same boat as you planting last year... Save yourself some money and buy turnip and radish seed from local farm store, make sure it is new seed for this year and not leftover stuff. broadcast that on a CLEAN seed bed and 2 weeks later broadcast a reduced rate (but dont skimp) of winter rye grain and crimson clover. Had 8-12 inch radish, softball sized turnips, attracting deer like crazy, and come spring there was an entire field full of crimson clover. All I had to do was spray cleth and overseed with clover in the spring and it was a perfect field of clover. Super easy and the money you save on seed you can spend on fertilizer and/or lime.
 
1 - 20 of 38 Posts
Top