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I've seen this before. in warmer temperatures. there pounding a Wheat field. as soon as it gets cold with snow they abandon it . It's almost like they love wheat they do not care for wheat popsicles .am I missing something here? There's lots of deer in the immediate area browsing on Briars .watched them for 3 hours. Only a few tracks in the Wheatfield. Anyone seen this before.

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I've seen this before. in warmer temperatures. there pounding a Wheat field. as soon as it gets cold with snow they abandon it . It's almost like they love wheat they do not care for wheat popsicles .am I missing something here? There's lots of deer in the immediate area browsing on Briars .watched them for 3 hours. Only a few tracks in the Wheatfield. Anyone seen this before.

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That's very common where I live in the upper midwest. Once the snow gets too deep, the deer opt out of food plots/crops, for available winter browse.
 

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I believe it has something to do with their stomachs being able to process different types of food. In the winter they can process the bark type foods and not so much the grain type foods. I read someplace that is why you should not feed corn in the winter to deer. I hve read (know not where) that there was even instances of deer dying of starvation with full bellies of corn because they could not process it.
 

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Yeah I'm aware of that .that happens with sheep too .if their digestive system isnt accustomed to corn the corn can kill them. Their digestive system simply can't handle it. I think in this case some foods are not appealing to Deer when they are frozen. Basically they like wheat .they don't really care for wheat popsicles. I think that's it. Or at least they would much rather eat Briars over wheat popsicles.

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I believe it has something to do with their stomachs being able to process different types of food. In the winter they can process the bark type foods and not so much the grain type foods. I read someplace that is why you should not feed corn in the winter to deer. I hve read (know not where) that there was even instances of deer dying of starvation with full bellies of corn because they could not process it.
It really depends on what is around for your deer too I believe. I am surrounded by corn fields where I hunt and the deer pound the fields all year long looking for remaining corn. But if your deer are not accustom to digesting corn to begin with, then i would believe it would not be good for them in the winter months. i also hear it is bad to feed alfalfa to them in the winter because there is not much nutrients from it, but the deer will feel full from it...of course I red all that on the internet so it must be true :)
 

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It really depends on what is around for your deer too I believe. I am surrounded by corn fields where I hunt and the deer pound the fields all year long looking for remaining corn. But if your deer are not accustom to digesting corn to begin with, then i would believe it would not be good for them in the winter months. i also hear it is bad to feed alfalfa to them in the winter because there is not much nutrients from it, but the deer will feel full from it...of course I red all that on the internet so it must be true :)
If the alfalfa was cut, dried and baled at the right times during the summer it should have lots of protein and other nutrients in it.
In fact good alfalfa hay is one of the highest protein and TDN (Total Digestible Nutrients) forages available to ruminants.

But if it was cut very late or after it blossomed, it will be mostly indigestible fiber.
Cutting alfalfa early and often is the best way to maximize meat and milk yield on a per-acre basis for domestic animals and that carries over to deer and elk as well.

But if the animals have not been eating it regularly, their gut enzymes and bacteria won't be able to handle even the best quality alfalfa hay. So merely dumping alfalfa hay to starving deer or elk won't help them much unless they've had some access to it earlier in the Fall.
They need to be acclimated to it slowly over a period of time so their systems can adjust.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
i Remember there was a reality TV show about a veterinarian .the veterinarian had to go out to a farm the Sheep had found some corn and ate it veterinarian had to pump it all out of their stomach before it killed them.

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If the alfalfa was cut, dried and baled at the right times during the summer it should have lots of protein and other nutrients in it.
In fact good alfalfa hay is one of the highest protein and TDN (Total Digestible Nutrients) forages available to ruminants.

But if it was cut very late or after it blossomed, it will be mostly indigestible fiber.
Cutting alfalfa early and often is the best way to maximize meat and milk yield on a per-acre basis for domestic animals and that carries over to deer and elk as well.

But if the animals have not been eating it regularly, their gut enzymes and bacteria won't be able to handle even the best quality alfalfa hay. So merely dumping alfalfa hay to starving deer or elk won't help them much unless they've had some access to it earlier in the Fall.
They need to be acclimated to it slowly over a period of time so their systems can adjust.
kronik---my hunting buddy is veterinarian and also has a PhD in wildlife disease---he has pounded this into me many times---
 
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