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Francis
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
for broadhead accuracy do you just screw the head on and shoot,



or... must you take into account if the blades are lined up with the fletching for example.

or... an example with 2 blades like the magnus, does it matter how the head is positioned on the shaft? shooting with blade vertical or horizontal?

if neither of these matter for best accuracy, my question would be , should all the arrows be done in the same way at least?

or can they all be orientated a liitle differnt and fly the same?

please any help would be appreciated

Thanks
Francis
 

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I've done it both ways and quite frankly couldn't see the difference.
 

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Spend the time!

With broadheads it's important to have them set-up all the same. Each broadhead/arrow asembly must spin true. If it wobbles it will wobble and veer in flight as well. I start with the blades lined up with the fletching and then rotate them as nessecarry to achieve the best grouping possible. Buy an extra set of blades or broadheads and practice the tunning with those. Then swap out the parts that need to be changed like points nd blades with the new sharped parts. As long as the spin true and weigh the same and align the same on the shaft they will fly to the same point as the practice setup. Ken
 

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I haven't noticed any difference when they weren't matched. I do them all the same now, I set them so the are opposite the vanes, why? Simple, I like the way it looks when its on the bow, with the blade sticking straight up (cock vane down).

--Bob
 

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Your broadheads must be aligned properly to the arrow shaft(no wobble when you spin check them), your arrow shaft must be straight and the proper spine for your bow, and your bow must be in tune.

The alignment of blades to your fletching has no bearing on how your arrows fly with broadheads.
 

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Redheaded Stepchild
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I've heard of people lining their two-blades up with the string depending on type of bow they were shooting (recurve= side to side, compound= up and down) to match the natural oscillation of the arrow as its released and minimize planing during this time frame. Anybody else do this or know if it really makes that much of a difference?
 
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