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Discussion Starter #1
Form Critique request for Tony (Viper1), or anyone else who wants to jump on me. :p

I know I have a high elbow, but due to an old football shoulder injury there's
nothing I can do about it.

OK, so lay it on me. I can take it. :)


10363131_655775601178843_7810972700480491263_n.jpg

Rick
 

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Actually, your elbow doesn't look high at all.

Looks like your shoulders are bunched up- particularly the bow shoulder. Also looks like you should rotate your bow arm to get the elbow a bit more vertical.

Last I can see is it looks like you have a lot of tension in your string hand, hard to be sure of that from the photo though. Just basing it on the way the your knuckles at the back of the hand are curled as if in a fist.

My two cents...
 

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Discussion Starter #4

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At first?...I figured this thread was akin to putting a "HOW'S MY DRIVING?" bumper sticker on NASCAR #8...but upon closer observation?...it does appear your bow arm shoulder is a touch high...but hey...you have some physical limitations so?...so maybe with the high string hand elbow they match! :laugh:

in either event...you're nailing golf balls at 50yds and you wanna screw with that? :confused:

now if you really want to improve on something...

might I suggest you get some styling advice on hat selection? :laugh:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
You shoot with a fairly dead release?
I would say my release is simi static. I do use back tension, and have rearward hand movement along my face.
My cheek is often chaffed after a lot of shooting.

Here's a video for you Joe.
Bill, I got rid of the Beverly Hillbilly hat just so you wouldn't be distracted. :p


I have neither the time, nor the funds to go to a shooting clinic, or get coaching, but I'm always looking for ways to improve,
and if a suggestion is made that I can implement & benefit from I'm all for it. :)

Rick
 

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String grip looks like the ring finger is being pulled in further than the other two. Don't know enough about three under to say which is supposed to be primary or the trigger.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
String grip looks like the ring finger is being pulled in further than the other two. Don't know enough about three under to say which is supposed to be primary or the trigger.
I draw with the majority of the pressure on the ring finger (helps with the heavier draw weights), but once I get to anchor I rotate that pressure onto the index finger to release.
The pressure rotation, and the feather pressure in my nostril are actually my triggers to release.

Ring finger pressure is something I used to really have a lot of trouble with (again related to my shoulder injury), but I discovered a way to
train myself to engage the string at anchor with the index finger by using a specially layered tab. My callous on that ring finger is all but gone now.

Rick
 

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Looking at the video, looks like your bow shoulder and elbow are good. Perhaps a quirk of the picture.

Still looks like a lot of tension in the string hand, but if it's consistent then I won't argue.
 

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at first I thought...slight collapse...but blowing it up?...and the lack of string hand movement at release?...especially with your 60+# bow?...I seriously question your use of BT...a form-master would tell the real story...but it appears to me it's not "a collapse" (per se)...it's the way you shoot...and it looks like you're letting the string roll off your fingers rather than "pulling through the shot" wit BT...which in turn is "emulating" a static release....and you're dropping your bow arm slightly.

all I got...hope it helps and L8R, Bill. :cool2:
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I would say there is above average tension in my hand.
I can shoot lighter draw weight bows, and pretty much completely relax my hand before loose,
but not with the heavier weights. I always say this is a 65# bow, but it is right at 67# at my draw as you see it here.

Rick
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Yep Bill, it's pretty static, but not completely.
I do use a lot of back tension, but I don't draw with it.
I start engaging it as I settle into my anchor.

I don't think I am creeping, but I might be slightly.
I'm working on it. :)

If you blow the video up, and watch just the fletching on my nose, you will notice that while I am resting at anchor
the fletch is pretty much at the tip of the nose, but at the instant before release it is crushed into my nostril.

Rick
 

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Yep Bill, it's pretty static, but not completely.
I do use a lot of back tension, but I don't draw with it.
I start engaging it as I settle into my anchor.

I don't think I am creeping, but I might be slightly.
I'm working on it. :)

Rick
Rig yourself up a form-master Rick...that's the video I'd be interested in seeing as sometimes?...even with video analysis?...we still just "think we know" what's going on...where form-master results would be pretty much proof-positive. ;)
 

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Reason I asked about the static release is because of the tension in the hand and slight hunch in the shoulder. I've seen a lot of people with the dead release shoot with a similar technique. In order to lock in the bow arm and string hand you end up adding muscular tension in the shoulders. The string hand also ends up with more tension. It's very difficult to keep everything still when you shoot with strong back tension and really relax the forearm and fingers.

In your case you do have rearward elbow motion but you are trying to pin the hand in place. It also looks a bit like you are consciously triggering the shot because your fingers end up stiff and splayed. I'm also seeing some forced motion in the bow arm. It wants to move back and around. I see that also with the static release. If you think of the lines of force during the shot on a well executed release than hand comes back and around the head. The bow arm moves forward and maybe a little left and down (depends on how you engage your back and muscular balance). With the static type release you have to hold the string hand still and most guys end up with the hand moving sideways at release instead of forward/ backward. There is also a tendency when fatigue sets in to start collapsing a bit (either back, bow arm, or fingers) and the sideways motion gets more violent.

Obviously you shoot very well so take this with a grain of salt. But, I'd look at working on relaxing the pressure in the forearm and fingers. Also, maybe work on relaxing the follow through so it's more of a continuation of the push/pull inherent in shooting a bow. I find a strong pull and strong push forward give me a far better bow arm than trying to hold it on target by will alone.

Chris
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I have a form master. Homemade.
I work out with it now & then.

Rick
 

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Rick,

Not much I'd critique there. You do work very hard to hold your string hand in place -- see the twist and wobble you get at the release in your whole body? That will largely go away if you just let that string hand do what it wants rather than trying to stop it from moving. You have to apply your front side muscles to stop the movement (pecks) which really are not needed for the shot. If you try the form master, I think they are only recommended for 50# or less (could be wrong) but with 67# you may not be able to see the results to any advantage.

If you and I were working together in person, I'd have you try to let the string hand release to the rear and reduce the obvious body motion. I think your shot over all is pretty good otherwise.

Arne
 

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This may sound weird and not work.... but.... do you have a shooting glove you can try? I find it easier to relax my fingers shooting with a glove and can actually draw further back with the string being at the same point on my face as I do using a tab. I mention this as you are wearing glasses and that may limit you on draw length. Getting a little further back might help you with your release.

2 very knowledgeable people giving you advise, as well
 
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