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Hello, I have been reading a lot on here about form and I have tried to work harder on mine. Today, I took a few videos and am asking for analysis and constructive critisism on my less than stellar form. Today I tried switching from 3 under to a split and found that my form improved. With 3 under, my back was not pinched and my shoulders were slumped over due to my aiming down the arrow. I think right now I am going to stick with a split grip because of speed of shot and form.

Sometimes, I felt like my trapezoids were pulling the bow, not the shoulder blade/back, but that could be residure from having a back/shoulder workout yesterday.

Anyways, please tell me the bad and good. If it matters, like I said, I had a good shoulder/back workout yesterday.
5'8"
237
~27"DL





Thank you,
P.B.Walsh
 

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P.B.

If is evident by your flying hand on release that you are not getting your back into the shot. You are pulling straight back with your shoulder and arm and that is causing your arm to fly backward on release. If you are using your back, your shoulder will rotate back and your hand will end up behind your head. You can be feeling your back but that does not mean that it is making a constructive contribution to the shot. You are also not getting to anchor and this is your biggest issue. In my opinion, you have a few things to work on before you are ready to really focus on your back, getting info anchor being first..

What weight bow are you pulling? You look like your are over bowed. You are not controlling the bow. Weight can be a hindrance to the learning process and often manifests itself in snap shooting and falling short of anchor.

I know that this does not sound real positive. How well you are doing depends on how long you have been at it. It is important to know your experience level. The positive is that you care about your form and are asking for help and assessment.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I have about a year of touch and go experience (cannot shoot on my college campus). I am shooting a 50 pound Sammick Sage. I kinda thought I was being over bowed, but I thought since I can easily pull 50 pounds (most often much more) on various rows in the gym, a #50 recurve would not be hard.

This is the exact feedback I was hoping for! Just hate the fact I might have to buy more limbs and arrows..... that is my worry.

Keep it coming!
 

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First as hank suggested you need to come to full draw and hold it even if for just a few moments. Try using two anchor points instead of one. For instance I use middle finger in corner of mouth and thumb knuckle behind my jaw bone. Think of your upper body as a "T" both shoulders and bow arms should be aligned straight. Check out some youtube videos by a guy who goes by Moebow. I believe Jimmy Blackmon has some good form videos as well. Also Terry Greens "form clock" (just google it you'll find it). Good luck man! A lot of guys around here recommend a book by Anthony Camera Called "shooting the stickbow" It is supposed to be very comprehensive you might check it out I hear nothing but good things.
 

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P.B.

It is hard to learn unless you have complete command of the bow. That means going light. In fact, very light, depending on what you are trying to achieve in your form. I started with a new coach a few months ago and have actually gone to an 18 pound bow and stretch bands to refine my shooting. That is what it takes to learn how to properly shoot with my back rather than with my arms and shoulders. Get some stretch bands and do some practice in front of a mirror. I set up two mirrors so I can see my back while I draw. Use the videos above as a reference. They will give you something to shoot for. Here are the links to their Youtube channels. I also included a link to Performance Archery. It is more advanced than the other two but there are some interesting things you can learn from it. You need to keep it simple in the beginning. Archery is learned in steps. You cannot learn step 3 until you learn 1 and 2. I think you are trying to jump too many steps ahead.

I would definitely look for some light limbs. Your shooting will improve very quickly when you can ignore the weight of the bow and concentrate fully on execution. Even when your form is good, you need to be able to ignore the weight of the bow.

Like I said, I am working with an 18 pound bow now, 24.3 pounds at my 32 inch draw. I actually get a 40 yard point-on with 320 grain arrows. I decided that I am going to shoot this bow at a 3D this weekend, rather than returning to my competition weight. I need to focus on good execution, and I have enough pop, even with the light limbs, to make the shots.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbp6-yyllTxo6pnhEYFpKhQ Moe

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LceBNHj1FDM&list=PLR0FGX9w9pPIqEWAUPfNlWO_Sz5JVWnnC Jimmy Blackmon

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LceBNHj1FDM&list=PLR0FGX9w9pPIqEWAUPfNlWO_Sz5JVWnnC Performance Archery
 

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Just hate the fact I might have to buy more limbs and arrows..... that is my worry.

Keep it coming!
Which is why everyone always suggests starting light in the first place. You wind up spending a lot more if you try to go with your "last bow" for your first bow. You won't need new arrows though, what you have will work they just won't group in the center. Not important, you're looking for consistency (groups) first.

There's been a lot of good advice already. Definitely slow down, you should reach anchor and expanded for at least a couple seconds before coming to conclusion. Start with the bow up and pointed at the target, rather than swinging both arms up (your bow arm is lower than your shoulders, not in line- costing you draw length and consistency). You're shooting at a close target and should be bent at the waist.

Right now your best bet, depending on how accurate you want to become, is to slow down and straight your arms/shoulders. The difference those two small changes will make should be massive if done right.

... Ask me how I know:lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the quick responses, I do appreciate them. I am going to try again sometime this weekend. The new limbs might have to be put on hold, might have to buy new tires.

I thought I could not use the same arrows in a #50 and #39 bow? You said the groups woud be different, how much so?

When I can get a bit of time, I am going to watch the videos, thanks to all!
 

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You need to go lighter than 39#.

-Grant
 

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A stiff arrow will group left for a right handed shooter. At close range, where you work on form, you won't really notice anything besides tail kick. You're shooting for groups-consistency. You don't need perfect tuning to practice.

I agree with Grant. You look like you have at least another inch of draw in you, which means that you're hitting your physical limit at around 47#. If your limit is 47#, you won't be dominating 39#. Here's a cheap way to practice: get a 10' stick of 1/2" PVC, cut a 66" piece in it, notch the ends and string it up. Presto, a nice 25-30# bow to practice form on that cost you $2.

Once you get the feel of a solid shot, start incorporating your regular bow. Though not ideal, this would save you money and get you on the right track.
 

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I made the same mistake as you, and had bought a 40# as my first bow half a year ago. After buying Viper's book, Shooting The Stickbow, and asking a lot of questions here I got lighter and focused on proper form. Take these guys' advice! It's invaluable. Good luck and have fun, P.B.
 

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As already mentioned, go to a lower draw weight and find an actual anchor. At the same time get your target up off the ground and check these 2 links out:

https://books.google.com/books?id=-...CGAQ6AEwDQ#v=onepage&q=archery t form&f=false

Start with page 25

and:

http://www.hfrr.ksu.edu/doc2115.ashx

Yes, we can all get off on to a discussion about trying to fit all shooters into one mold. But that is not why I'm posting this. I honestly think that a good, basic, starting point would be a good thing here.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Crap I meant to say #30!! Dang typos..... So instead of an $80 pair of limbs you think some pvc would work? Could I actually let an arrow fly off that?

I need to rig up some cordage to get the target off the ground, that'll be this weeks goal.
 

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Heck just set it up on a stump or old table or something. But also consider a good back stop behind the actual target. Stacked bales of straw is good, but even just a big sheet of plywood is better than nothing. Think safety, of course.
 

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Yup, just go to Home Depot, buy a section of 1/2" PVC Schedule 40. As soon as you pick it up you'll notice it starts noodling and flexing. It won't look great, it won't shoot great, and it will feel weird with a tiny shapeless grip but it will launch an arrow (the arrows you have) at 10 feet and allow you to work on form. Any rope that's thick enough to hold your nock will work. Walmart has "camping cord" which is about the size of your stock Sage string.

Like I said, it's not ideal, but it's cheap and you're just practicing form here, you don't need anything fancy.
 

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Here is an example of "Control" if you continue down the path you are on it will end in frustration. Get limbs you can control.

 
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