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no problem

I can assure you that a Fury X cam system should have no string "slap" against the forearm. In fact, with the cables positioned much closer to the forearm than the string, the bow string WILL NEVER come in contact with your arm. In a sense, the shoot-thru designs in general act as a sort of form check. If you draw the bow with the cables resting on your arm, for example, then you will know you've gripped the bow differently. Remember, the buss cables move mainly up and down as the bow is drawn. They do move back slightly as the limbs flex, with the load shifting from string to cables. Only about 10% of the people who try the Fury-X system, including Bowman's Wedel cam, are incompatible with the four cable arrangement. In most cases where there is string slap, either the draw length is too long, or the elbow is slightly hyperextended. Other than that, the benefits significantly outweigh the negatives. Many archers still are not aware of the negative effects of cable guard torque. Cable guard induced torque, or "side-loading" refers to the load displaced from the plane of the cable grooves on each cam/cam or cam/idler system. Yes, it is prevalent in all non-shoot thru systems. Public demand forced bow manufacturers to build shorter, faster bows. Most manufacturers answered by shortening the brace height of bows, effectively increasing the Power Stroke. By pushing the arrow over a greater distance, more energy transfers to the arrow. Nevertheless, shorter bows meant more side-loading of the cables and required larger cams. The amount of clearance needed for the fletching remains the same so we have to pull the cables out of the way over a shorter distance. The problem occurs when we use large cams, which displace the string further from the axle as it exits the cam. Cams that are side-loaded tend to "lean", causing excessive string and bearing wear. This excessive wear is also the cause of more static friction on the bearing surface as the cam is restricted from rotating on its' axis as freely as it should be. As the bow reaches peak weight during the draw cycle, the mechanical advantage gained by the cams reduces the weight the archer "feels" on the string. The load displaces to the cable, usually adjacent to one side of the cam. This happens to be the same side of the bow where the cable guard is situated. This further exacerbates the "limb torque" problem. When the cams lean, they must leave the "X" plane and the "Y" plane, where "X" is the plane of the bowstring, and where "Y" should be the cross section of the axles looking straight down or up on the bow. That means that the axles actually follow an elliptical path. The result is a tension/compression issue on either side of the limb tips during the shot. The negative results are excess vibration, premature limb failure, energy loss, string wear, cable wear, and greater string amplitude (translating into loss of accuracy). The Fury-X is the first four cable design that "captures" the limb tips. The string stays on the "X" plane, and the axles are parallel on the " Y" plane throughout the entire shot. Martin Archery has conducted extensive research is confident that the archery public will also recognize the benefits of eliminating the cable guard and simultaneously eliminating limb torque, wheel lean, and uneven axle wear, not to mention "bent" axles.
This system is perfectly suitable for any type of archery and certainly bowhunting. One of the biggest advantages I have found with a four-cable design is the ease of tuning fixed bladed broadheads. Certain models that I had tested in the past with poor results now fly perfectly straight with a multitude of tuning options. Now it is possible for large, high profile broadheads to fly great. Arrow spine is not nearly as critical either. It is amazing how easy to tune a fury-X system can be. Absolute center-shot. Straight and level nock travel. Fury-X cams reduce "string amplitude" upon release because the string is following a straighter path throughout the draw cycle. The cancels the effect of "planing". Look for exciting new designs from Martin in the future. 04' promises to deliver big improvements in technology.... I hear it has something to do with those crop circles near GRIV's house...
 
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