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Discussion Starter #1
Here's my 2 cents having this blind now for 48 hours ;)

The Double Bull Surround View Blinds are offered in three packages. All are 5 hub systems, have a heavy duty carrying bag, a stake down kit and come in sizes that I'll classify as:

Small - 48X48X65 and 180 degrees of view from 2 panels with 2 blacked out (inside). It's a good fit for one adult and maybe a small child.
Medium - 55X55X70 and 270 degrees of view from 3 panels with 1 blacked out. Only slightly bigger, two average sized adults could fit but it would be tight.
Large - 60X50X70 and 360 degrees of view. A hanging panel is provided if you want to add a black back drop. There should be plenty of room for two adults.

This Medium size, 270 degree view blind is the one I have and it's up. That effort required a review on YouTube to do as the hub system has a sequence to follow to open. The instructions provided are OK, but not the best for a first- timer, WTH maybe it's just me.....

I've looked at it inside and out, top to bottom. I setup my preferred chair and with my Storm and Specialist, I tested shooting positions on a field pod and with shooting sticks. It's a big enough blind for one hunter, very comfortable and I had no issues finding easy to get to shooting lanes. I think this is going to be a really, really good blind for a crossbow shooter.

DBull270.jpg

Observations:

The "Truth" camo pattern is interesting and seems be following the trend these days of less traditional shapes to produce shadows and depth. Time will tell how well it works. The stealth "view through" material looks very good from the outside and at 5' you have to look very close to see into it. Beyond that distance, I think it will be very effective camo if you are generally still inside the blind. From the inside out the "view through" material starts 24" off the ground and it reminds me of looking through a porch screen. Some visual interference but still very easy to see through.

DBull270_Window.jpg

It's also easy to look through even as light goes away and that's the game changer I'm counting on. When I hunt deer here in Texas I have a spot near a watering hole and I'll sit there from 3 in the afternoon until 7-8 pm or later if I'm also after hogs. Looking out one small barn shaped window makes for a long hunt.

InsideOut2.jpg

I may experiment with it yet this winter here in TX but I do plan to take it to KS for a spring turkey hunt. After that it will be used here next fall for deer.

The blind materials, stitching, zippers and hubs and struts are much heavier and appear to be of better quality than what is used on the Ameristep blinds I have. And I think you would expect that from a blind that has a Lifetime Warranty and one at this price point.

The vertical windows don't have velcro edges or are a tight fitting window cover so wind and critters may be more prevalent. They have a black cover panel that attaches at top and bottom.

DBull270_BlockOuts.jpg

DBull270_BlockOutsOpen.jpg

The material used for the viewing sections of the blind are perforated so they will pass water, especially in driven rain. I think we have rain the forecast so I'll check that out later this week. I generally don't hunt in rain so this may not be an issue.

Each of the side center hubs has a tether point on the outside of the blind for tying it down. Inside the blind there are eight stake points on the four corners and on the four centers. The lower edge of the blind does have a nice fold over which will help block wind and visibility.

There are no loops or straps on the sides or top for brush.

This is a 270 degree "view" blind and I think a guy needs to carefully consider a couple things as he decides which one of the three blinds is the right choice:
- Will this be a one man or more hunting blind?
- Where is this blind going to be setup?
- How much will it be brushed in and how does that affect the view?
- How much view do you really need and how much black back drop you want thinking from a viewing animals POV?
- How will the weather affect the blind?
- Direct sun, depending on angle will affect how well the stealth characteristic of the perforated viewing sections of the blind work. I wouldn't suggest setting it up with shooting lanes facing a rising or setting sun.

At this point I like it a lot. Tune in six months from now and I'll have some experience with it and a better opinion.
 

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Thanks for the review; not sure it would be weatherproof enough up here in NW Michigan. May be OK for earlier season.
 

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Nice review! Looking forward to further reports on it. Very interested as all of my hunting is done from the ground, pop up and box blinds.
 

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It looks like a good blind.
Does keeping the stm up on a standard blind not accomplish the same thing?
I like the idea about a life time guarantee.."..
Good luck with it. It definitely looks well made.
 

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Here's my 2 cents having this blind now for 48 hours ;)

The Double Bull Surround View Blinds are offered in three packages. All are 5 hub systems, have a heavy duty carrying bag, a stake down kit and come in sizes that I'll classify as:

carefully consider a couple things as he decides which one of the three blinds is the right choice:
- Will this be a one man or more hunting blind?
- Where is this blind going to be setup?
- How much will it be brushed in and how does that affect the view?
- How much view do you really need and how much black back drop you want thinking from a viewing animals POV?
- How will the weather affect the blind?
- Direct sun, depending on angle will affect how well the stealth characteristic of the perforated viewing sections of the blind work. I wouldn't suggest setting it up with shooting lanes facing a rising or setting sun.

At this point I like it a lot. Tune in six months from now and I'll have some experience with it and a better opinion.

I like the idea but think these are terrible for deer hunting due to lack of scent control. Regular blinds, while they still let some scent out, work VERY well for scent control. I remember when I first started hunting with regular blinds, id keep the windows mostly open. I would be completely blacked out color wise so they wouldn't pick me up visually and had deer in front of me. But as soon as wind blew down to them they would smell me and book it out of there. I then started keeping the windows as closed as possible while still allowing vision in my shooting lanes. I have had deer down wind of me many many times with this setup and not once have been winded since. A few times when the wind blew, they would catch a very very faint scent of me...I assume...because they would get on edge, but then the wind would stop blowing or change directions and they calmed down. Now with these new blinds...you completely take that advantage away. You will no doubt, have to watch the wind with these blinds which to me is a HUGE negative. I mean come on...how much of the deer do you really need to see? For turkey hunting, these blinds are definitely great but for deer hunting...ill pass.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I don't think scent masking goes away as much as you may think, certainly not completely and in my case hunting hot weather quite a bit, I spray often so I'm not on board "yet" with that conclusion. Again, time will tell.

The Ameristeps I use only get small window cracks when the wind is right and only when it's extremely hot for ventilation. This past year I've had deer, pigs, rabbits and coyotes on a trail within 10' of the blind not knowing I'm there.

What I'm looking for is a few more minutes to prepare for game and to see if there is game that doesn't come in for whatever reason.

We did get a 15 minute shower today and had about 8 mph winds. Nothing came through to the inside of the blind but a heavier, longer rain may change that. So far it's 100% dry.

I have to laugh a little at scent control practices from some of the blinds I've seen. Hunters have windows open on 3 of the 4 sides wide open, in foul weather they have propane heaters inside and they are chewing and spitting constantly. And these guys routinely get deer, generally very average deer in the case of bucks, but they do put them down.
 

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"I have to laugh a little at scent control practices from some of the blinds I've seen. Hunters have windows open on 3 of the 4 sides wide open, in foul weather they have propane heaters inside and they are chewing and spitting constantly. And these guys routinely get deer, generally very average deer in the case of bucks, but they do put them down."

Wish you would stop talking about me RDX!:)
 

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I don't think scent masking goes away as much as you may think, certainly not completely and in my case hunting hot weather quite a bit, I spray often so I'm not on board "yet" with that conclusion. Again, time will tell.

The Ameristeps I use only get small window cracks when the wind is right and only when it's extremely hot for ventilation. This past year I've had deer, pigs, rabbits and coyotes on a trail within 10' of the blind not knowing I'm there.

What I'm looking for is a few more minutes to prepare for game and to see if there is game that doesn't come in for whatever reason.

We did get a 15 minute shower today and had about 8 mph winds. Nothing came through to the inside of the blind but a heavier, longer rain may change that. So far it's 100% dry.

I have to laugh a little at scent control practices from some of the blinds I've seen. Hunters have windows open on 3 of the 4 sides wide open, in foul weather they have propane heaters inside and they are chewing and spitting constantly. And these guys routinely get deer, generally very average deer in the case of bucks, but they do put them down.
I’ll respectfully disagree on scent control with blinds.
I ham able to hunt three different areas using my ground blind that I couldn’t from a tree stand.
One spot really drove me nuts because it wa a high traffic funnel that always had swirling winds.
The deer would come within fifty yards and it was like they were on a string.
They would hit a certain point,stop and start the old head wagging and sniffing and them swap ends and take off.
Afte4 I set my blind up with one window cracked enough to shoot through and one other cracked about an inch to see them coming,I’ve since taken two nice deer at that site.
Again go through all the scent control with your Camo hat and body that you would if you were hunting a tree.
Over all I see a big advantage using a blind to control scent.
If I was to hunt with all the windows open,that type of scent control would not be there.
I do agree that hunting from a tree offers a much better chance to see game coming,but I sit in my blind with my bow on my knee,so as long as I’m not taking a cat nap I’ll be ready.
A heater in a blind even when it’s thirty below is not an option IMO...
I also believe the warmer the weather,the more scent will be released.
That may be a major reason with you hunting Texas and me hunting northern Ontario that we see different results with scent control.
As I said before,I think that’s a sharp looking blind and you can’t beat a lifetime warranty.
My big mike blind is starting to show it’s age after five years...I did get it on sale for 75 bucks so I’ll be looking for another.
Good luck with your hunting.
 

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Im interested in this blind i like it. Thanks for the review and pics. Just like so many things its a tool. That has its place im sure.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
You bring up an excellent example of ground blind placement, geography, learning and adapting. This style blind may not be the ticket for that spot but there's still no tangible info. yet that makes me fell that the material used for the "View" function automatically makes this blind unable to provide any reasonable level of scent control. As they get used that will naturally become known, no doubt.

I really like to hunt above eye level so I spend a lot of time hunting from climbers outside of Texas but find the blind hunting another style of hunting I do like and one that has a nice set of advantages.

We had a couple rain incidents today but not heavy and not driven but the inside of the view through material stayed 100% dry. Temps go back up into the 60s tomorrow and Thursday so I'll get the garden hose after it and see how it holds up.
 

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It offers more scent control than a Ghost Blind :)
IMG_0591.JPG
The trick isnt scent control at all. Fact of the matter is you want them to smell you.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
And that's something to think about too. If these darn things get really popular, and I suspect they will, the Turkey hunters will snatch 'em all up.

I made a call to Primos last month before they started shipping and was lucky enough to get an employee to tell me the names of dealers that got first shipments. None were down here near Texas yet so I had to call stores to find them and ended up getting one out of Scheels in Des Moines, IA.
 

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TX,
Do the hogs bother a blind if you leave it out? I know up here if I leave a blind out near a bear blind they will chew it up or rip it to shreds. They regularly beat up my trail cams too.... just wondering about the pigs.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Not so far CA. I have had some curious cows pop in a side of a blind, then step on it tearing the blind but so far the hogs have not. I've got a camera that looks toward my blind so I've watched it since I put it out back in September.

The place I hunt in AR is another story. We get transient black bears that pass through feeding on the local berries. They have taken out our feeders if they can get to them. We now hang everything and keep them pretty high. We did have a bear take down an old blind that we had left out this past year.

Fdr3#_0812PopUp.jpg

St#6_0716Bear.jpg

St#6_0812Fdr.jpg

0813Bear1.JPG
 

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So the blind is basically made out of netting or is it a more durable see-thru material than netting?
 

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You bring up an excellent example of ground blind placement, geography, learning and adapting. This style blind may not be the ticket for that spot but there's still no tangible info. yet that makes me fell that the material used for the "View" function automatically makes this blind unable to provide any reasonable level of scent control. As they get used that will naturally become known, no doubt.

I really like to hunt above eye level so I spend a lot of time hunting from climbers outside of Texas but find the blind hunting another style of hunting I do like and one that has a nice set of advantages.

We had a couple rain incidents today but not heavy and not driven but the inside of the view through material stayed 100% dry. Temps go back up into the 60s tomorrow and Thursday so I'll get the garden hose after it and see how it holds up.
it uses holes to allow light in. Holes equal air movement in and out which equals scent leaving. Easy to determine that.
 

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I want one…and another Nitro X…new Arrows…Gotta Add some new Camo…So yeah: Thanks for review…More good ideas then funds! These reviews sure help us spend money wisely!
 

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Discussion Starter #20
No, I wouldn't call it netting. The "view" section of the blind is made from a very heavy material as compared to the Ameristep blinds I have, measuring 3 to 4X the thickness.

Yes, it's perforated but this isn't a light material. The holes are triangular, offset pairs in rows and a pair of them are just under 1mm, so very small. I've got stitching holes all over my other blinds this big ;)

These pictures are about 3-4" wide.

DBull270MatOS.jpg

DBull270MatIS.jpg
 
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