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I have been shooting my whole life but have never done much of my own tuning, I just ordered new hunting arrows for this year and want to try and do some of this myself. I always have built my own arrows but that's where my knowledge on setting the bow and arrow combination up, goes out the window.

First, when I get my arrows built (easton axis), I plan on putting in the 75g brass inserts.

1. Do I spin test my arrows with/without field tips, or only broadheads? On this note, do you spin test target arrows as well when you get your points glued in? It would seem to me you'd want to spin test all without any point or a field point to determine if it will fly right.
2. I still like to take my bow to the shop to get set up with my knock point, rest set, paper tuned. How important is french tuning after a paper tune?
3. Won't french tuning throw your paper tear off at some point?
4. Is it really better to tune broadheads to hit the same as your field points? Or should you adjust your sight for your broadheads? It seems to me that then you'll have to readjust once you go back to field points; ie. move back your broadhead tuning adjustments to get field points to fly right again?
5. If you spin test arrows, does that mean you have to use hot melt glue to turn the insert? Or how do you fix a bad spin if you don't use a hot melt?
6. Is the correct order as follows?
Build arrows > Spin test > Set nock point, rest, get perfect paper tear > French tune with field points > Sight tape on and windage set > French tune with broadheads and move rest to ensure same hit as field points without moving sight

Thanks for the help in advance!
 

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I have been shooting my whole life but have never done much of my own tuning, I just ordered new hunting arrows for this year and want to try and do some of this myself. I always have built my own arrows but that's where my knowledge on setting the bow and arrow combination up, goes out the window.

First, when I get my arrows built (easton axis), I plan on putting in the 75g brass inserts.

1. Do I spin test my arrows with/without field tips, or only broadheads? On this note, do you spin test target arrows as well when you get your points glued in? It would seem to me you'd want to spin test all without any point or a field point to determine if it will fly right.
2. I still like to take my bow to the shop to get set up with my knock point, rest set, paper tuned. How important is french tuning after a paper tune?
3. Won't french tuning throw your paper tear off at some point?
4. Is it really better to tune broadheads to hit the same as your field points? Or should you adjust your sight for your broadheads? It seems to me that then you'll have to readjust once you go back to field points; ie. move back your broadhead tuning adjustments to get field points to fly right again?
5. If you spin test arrows, does that mean you have to use hot melt glue to turn the insert? Or how do you fix a bad spin if you don't use a hot melt?
6. Is the correct order as follows?
Build arrows > Spin test > Set nock point, rest, get perfect paper tear > French tune with field points > Sight tape on and windage set > French tune with broadheads and move rest to ensure same hit as field points without moving sight

Thanks for the help in advance!
So, you paper tune at 3 yards. Then, maybe you paper tune at 10 yards. Ok, then, maybe you go whole hog and paper tune at 20 yards. Then, you shoot your sniper rifle at 1000 yards, and do you mess up your paper tune at 20 yards, when you fine tune your 1000 yd shots? Paper tuning is short range kinda sorta tuning. Paper tuning is not anywhere close to FINAL tuning at full shooting distance. If you shoot 90 meters (100 yards), who cares if you mess up your 10 yd paper tune? When you shoot full distance...whether thats 100 yards, whether full distance for you is 60 yards....final tuning your arrow rest for TIGHTEST groups at FULL distance way beats paper tuning at short range. WHY? Cuz, when you move your arrow rest 1/64th inch, when you move your arrow rest 1/128th inch, to tighten up your 60 yd groups....who cares what that does to your bullet hole at 6 yards?
 

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I have been shooting my whole life but have never done much of my own tuning, I just ordered new hunting arrows for this year and want to try and do some of this myself. I always have built my own arrows but that's where my knowledge on setting the bow and arrow combination up, goes out the window.

First, when I get my arrows built (easton axis), I plan on putting in the 75g brass inserts.

1. Do I spin test my arrows with/without field tips, or only broadheads? On this note, do you spin test target arrows as well when you get your points glued in? It would seem to me you'd want to spin test all without any point or a field point to determine if it will fly right.
2. I still like to take my bow to the shop to get set up with my knock point, rest set, paper tuned. How important is french tuning after a paper tune?
3. Won't french tuning throw your paper tear off at some point?
4. Is it really better to tune broadheads to hit the same as your field points? Or should you adjust your sight for your broadheads? It seems to me that then you'll have to readjust once you go back to field points; ie. move back your broadhead tuning adjustments to get field points to fly right again?
5. If you spin test arrows, does that mean you have to use hot melt glue to turn the insert? Or how do you fix a bad spin if you don't use a hot melt?
6. Is the correct order as follows?
Build arrows > Spin test > Set nock point, rest, get perfect paper tear > French tune with field points > Sight tape on and windage set > French tune with broadheads and move rest to ensure same hit as field points without moving sight

Thanks for the help in advance!


schuler26 AFTER my help. 20 yards. One field point with vanes. One field point with no vanes. One fixed blade broadhead. ALL hitting together. NOW, you are tuned. BUT, did this mess up his paper bullet hole at 3 yards? Don't know. Don't care. When you can get fletched and bareshaft and fixed blade broadhead to hit like this at 20 yards....your broadheads will group with your field points at any distance.
 

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I would recommend Nuts&Bolts modified french tune and bow setup protocols. If you follow his setup protocol you wont need to visit the bow shop, and you can save some cash while learning to become your own bow tech (pay yourself).

Spin testing becomes especially important when your using fixed BHs. It's usually a good idea to spin test as you build since you can still adjust your insert for a true spin (firenock has a video for assembling his outserts) while the epoxy is setting up. You will always want to try to achieve fixed BH impacting with FP. When you achieve this result, you know that the arrow is flying straight of the string, and no more adjusting of the sight is required when switching b/w arrow points.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I would recommend Nuts&Bolts modified french tune and bow setup protocols. If you follow his setup protocol you wont need to visit the bow shop, and you can save some cash while learning to become your own bow tech (pay yourself).

Spin testing becomes especially important when your using fixed BHs. It's usually a good idea to spin test as you build since you can still adjust your insert for a true spin (firenock has a video for assembling his outserts) while the epoxy is setting up. You will always want to try to achieve fixed BH impacting with FP. When you achieve this result, you know that the arrow is flying straight of the string, and no more adjusting of the sight is required when switching b/w arrow points.
This all comes after taking care of cam lean, center shot, tying in peep, etc since I don't have a press or vise in my apartment, correct? So once all of this is set at the shop, I can follow the above for tuning different arrows and such on my own at home, as long as the bow is set up correctly?

@Nuts&Bolts - do I even need to paper tune if I can get all three arrows to group then, or can I skip that part completely?

Also, is tiller important to measure on newer bows, and are they any other steps I'm missing?

Sent from my SM-G975U using Tapatalk
 

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Yes, you can skip paper tuning, if you are a hunter you can skip bare shaft. A BS and a fixed broad head will act similar, the broad head just goes a little far out in the same direction (maybe twice as much depending on the size/number of blades. A BS will work if you don't have a good foam target. Tiller is important, don't just rely on turning the bolts the same number of turns and expect the limbs to be even, check it. When twisting cables for cam adjustment the smallest adjustment you can make is 1/2 twist, you can make smaller adjustments with say 1/8 turn of a limb bolt. Some people do tiller tuning at long distance to shrink their groups (vertical adjustment) for telephone pole groups. I would recommend you spine align and or nock tune (clock) all your bare shafts prior to fletching. Good luck. Get a bow press and bolt it to a rolling tool cart w/wooden top, it will roll around your apartment just fine.
 

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This all comes after taking care of cam lean, center shot, tying in peep, etc since I don't have a press or vise in my apartment, correct? So once all of this is set at the shop, I can follow the above for tuning different arrows and such on my own at home, as long as the bow is set up correctly?

@Nuts&Bolts - do I even need to paper tune if I can get all three arrows to group then, or can I skip that part completely?

Also, is tiller important to measure on newer bows, and are they any other steps I'm missing?

Sent from my SM-G975U using Tapatalk
No bow vise, no bow press, then, you are limited to using a hex key wrench. With only a hex key wrench, you can adjust the limb bolts, to boost or lower draw weight. You can move the arrow rest up, you can move the arrow rest down. You can move the arrow rest left. You can move the arrow rest right. You can move the sight windage sideways (left to right).

So with your only tool, a hex key wrench, you can do some very very limited stuff. To get your arrow rest STARTING position, to something reasonable, you will need 2 arrows, and that hex key wrench.



Tape a 2nd arrow to the wall of your riser. You can also use a rubber band. Then, use that hex key wrench, loosen the sideways lock down bolt and move your arrow rest sideways, until both arrows are parallel.



If your eyeballs cannot see straight, and you have no idea what parallel looks like, then, use a slip of paper.







When the slip of paper touches both arrows, near the point, when the slip of paper touches both arrows near the nock, then, both arrows are parallel. The arrow on the arrow rest is also parallel to the wall of your riser. THIS is an EXCELLENT starting position for your arrow rest.
 

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This all comes after taking care of cam lean, center shot, tying in peep, etc since I don't have a press or vise in my apartment, correct? So once all of this is set at the shop, I can follow the above for tuning different arrows and such on my own at home, as long as the bow is set up correctly?

@Nuts&Bolts - do I even need to paper tune if I can get all three arrows to group then, or can I skip that part completely?

Also, is tiller important to measure on newer bows, and are they any other steps I'm missing?

Sent from my SM-G975U using Tapatalk
No bow vise, no bow press, then, you are limited to using a hex key wrench. With only a hex key wrench, you can adjust the limb bolts, to boost or lower draw weight. You can move the arrow rest up, you can move the arrow rest down. You can move the arrow rest left. You can move the arrow rest right. You can move the sight windage sideways (left to right).

So with your only tool, a hex key wrench, you can do some very very limited stuff. To get your arrow rest STARTING position, to something reasonable, you will need 2 arrows, and that hex key wrench.



Tape a 2nd arrow to the wall of your riser. You can also use a rubber band. Then, use that hex key wrench, loosen the sideways lock down bolt and move your arrow rest sideways, until both arrows are parallel.



If your eyeballs cannot see straight, and you have no idea what parallel looks like, then, use a slip of paper.







When the slip of paper touches both arrows, near the point, when the slip of paper touches both arrows near the nock, then, both arrows are parallel. The arrow on the arrow rest is also parallel to the wall of your riser. THIS is an EXCELLENT starting position for your arrow rest.
 

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After you have adjusted the sideways position of the arrow rest, then, we can go check on the STARTING position for the sight. We are gonna tune the sideways position of the sight (windage). So, get a target off the floor, all the way up to YOUR shoulder height. You are going to use dental floss to make a plumb bob. Just tie a weight to the end of the dental floss. So, now your challenge is to SPLIT the dental floss from only 2 yards away. NO excuse to miss the dental floss, when shooting only 2 yards away, just six feet.

Oh yeah. YOu are going to do this with a bareshaft, cuz it's a TOUGHER test.



Nope, not good enough. TWEAK only the sight windage a tiny bit. Bareshaft missing to the RIGHT of the plumb bob string, bump the sight windage a tiny tiny bit to the right.



BAM. Your sight windage is SUPER dialed in. You can HIT what you are looking at, from just 2 yards away. Next, we move to 20 yards.
 

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So, at 20 yards, you are going to shoot a group of fletched arrows. Since the ONLY tool you own, is a hex key wrench, then, you are limited to moving the arrow rest sideways, in TINY amounts. So, you shoot a group of fletched arrows at 20 yards, and you get THIS.



So, now what? Well, since the ONLY tool you own is a hex key wrench, then, you can ONLY move the arrow rest sideways a tiny amount, and you can ONLY move the arrow vertical in tiny amounts. So, we are going to group tune your arrow rest, which means, for folks who ONLY own a hex key wrench, we are going to find the sweet spot for sideways position on the arrow rest, and we are going to find the sweet spot for vertical position for the arrow rest. HOW will I know I'm done? When you are happy with the NEW group size.

 

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But, what about my bullet hole at 3 yards? Don't care. Your tight fletched groups at long distance is more important than your short range bullet hole through a sheet of paper. BUT, the fletched group is a little low. So, move the sight in the down direction.



What is THAT? That is a boat winch on the right, and a 1/2-inch pipe on the left. The pipe is screwed into a floor flange. This is a draw board, and the draw board is handy to hold the bow SAFELY at full draw, so you can check all kinds of things. Height of peep. Horizontal distance between peep sight and the backside of your sight pin. Draw length measurement. Checking when your drop away arrow rest comes to the full UP position (you want the arm to come fully up 1-inch away from full draw). You can also check that your arrow is DEAD PARALLEL to the cable guard (horizontal rod), at full draw. If the cable guard is horizontal and your arrow is pointing downhill, your d-loop is in the wrong spot.

 

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nuts and bolts dude. are you the same one who wrote the nuts and bolts archery tuning book . If so my hat is off to you, I learned so much about all the different aspects of tuning from this article. It is unbelievable the amount of stuff involved with shooting a bow. For many moons there was no one to help me tune, no pro shop, I didn't have any friends that shoot, so I winged it. Then I found the nuts and bolts of archery. For me a milestone. A start to finish wealth of information for one as ignorant as myself. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
nuts and bolts dude. are you the same one who wrote the nuts and bolts archery tuning book . If so my hat is off to you, I learned so much about all the different aspects of tuning from this article. It is unbelievable the amount of stuff involved with shooting a bow. For many moons there was no one to help me tune, no pro shop, I didn't have any friends that shoot, so I winged it. Then I found the nuts and bolts of archery. For me a milestone. A start to finish wealth of information for one as ignorant as myself. Thanks.
Amen, nuts and bolts. My hat's off to you, thanks a ton.

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nuts and bolts dude. are you the same one who wrote the nuts and bolts archery tuning book . If so my hat is off to you, I learned so much about all the different aspects of tuning from this article. It is unbelievable the amount of stuff involved with shooting a bow. For many moons there was no one to help me tune, no pro shop, I didn't have any friends that shoot, so I winged it. Then I found the nuts and bolts of archery. For me a milestone. A start to finish wealth of information for one as ignorant as myself. Thanks.
Yes. It started as a very long question/answer thread. A fellow organized the questions and answers into book format (he started the first draft). He was emailing the draft book one by one. I took over and added lots of pictures, added more material. He continued to email out the book, one by one by email. ArcheryTalk graciously offerred to host the large pdf file. That was 2010. I added more material to the end of Chapter 5 in 2012.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I would recommend Nuts&Bolts modified french tune and bow setup protocols. If you follow his setup protocol you wont need to visit the bow shop, and you can save some cash while learning to become your own bow tech (pay yourself).

Spin testing becomes especially important when your using fixed BHs. It's usually a good idea to spin test as you build since you can still adjust your insert for a true spin (firenock has a video for assembling his outserts) while the epoxy is setting up. You will always want to try to achieve fixed BH impacting with FP. When you achieve this result, you know that the arrow is flying straight of the string, and no more adjusting of the sight is required when switching b/w arrow points.
A couple more questions on the arrow topic. I am going with the axis 5mm match grade arrows with the brass inserts. I watched the firenock video and does the same apply with inserts? Use an epoxy that takes a while to set up, and twist the inserts with a point on to get them to spin right? Or do you remove the field point and square them if they don't, or should uou square them first, before you even start gluing the inserts in?

Sent from my SM-G975U using Tapatalk
 
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