Archery Talk Forum banner

1 - 20 of 32 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi all, new to the forum!

I have recently been borrowing one of my friend's bow and have since been addicted to archery.

I am thinking about getting my first bow and was wonder whether I should get a new bow intermediate level bow or a higher end model older bow.

I've heard really good things about Hoyt :)

Thoughts?

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
542 Posts
If you think you’re sticking with archery then I’d bite the bullet and get a flagship bow. Used is fine if it’s one you’ve shot and you already know that you like the feel of it. With new bows you can obviously go to a shop and shoot several and see what fits you best. If you have a shop with a decent bit of trade-in used bows then there’s a good option for you also.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,796 Posts
sound advice above. i'll add,...bows last a long time these days. I would opt for a used one or two year old flagship in any brand, before buying an mid-range or entry level bow. if you intend to stay with the sport, you will be motivated to upgrade your bow sooner than you think. a one or two year old flagship isn't all that much different than the same bow brand new, but a lot better than a mid level or entry level bow. most of the guys selling bows on here take good care of their bows because they know they are going to sell them in a year or so and want to get as much as they can towards their next purchase. every one of the 9 bows I've bought since about 2006 from the classifieds here, have been like new when I got them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
I didnt see the value, nor is it realistic on my budget to buy a new bow. Instant loss of value. A good used bow is definitely not a bad way to go. Especially if you're hunting with it. If it isn't in perfect cosmetic condition, you won't sweat using it
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,501 Posts
I have done both,
I got a new one last time because , what I wanted was not on the used market yet New years release. no regrets

I have purchased a older used bow for wife.. it was in amazing shape much better than stated no regrets

just depends , what ya want and can you settle on a color that not your favorite.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
I would recommend looking at a 1 - 2 year old used flagship bow if you think you're going to be serious about it. Much better value than a new mid level bow. If you're stuck on buying a new bow, you can usually find holdovers from previous years at discounted prices. That's how I've picked up my last few bows.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
363 Posts
Being you're kinda new to archery, I would highly recommend getting yourself fitted by a qualified tech before you spend a dime. I'm talking from experience here. My first compound back in 91 i bought at a swap meet for $30.. Back then I had no idea what I was doing. That bow was way too long for me, the arrows were all wrong and full length. I missed several deer that year.lol
Get fitted. if you can afford it buy from a good reputable dealer that can help you get started right. I wish i did back then.
There will be plenty of time to buy used. Crap, I must have 15 bows now.
Thats just my opinion.
good luck brother
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
"If you think you’re sticking with archery then I’d bite the bullet and get a flagship bow. Used is fine if it’s one you’ve shot and you already know that you like the feel of it. With new bows you can obviously go to a shop and shoot several and see what fits you best. If you have a shop with a decent bit of trade-in used bows then there’s a good option for you also."

Okay, I like that advice. There are a few local Hoyt bows for sale. A carbon matrix plus, Carbon Spyder and a helix turbo.

I will see what local bow shops have in their used section.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
sound advice above. i'll add,...bows last a long time these days. I would opt for a used one or two year old flagship in any brand, before buying an mid-range or entry level bow. if you intend to stay with the sport, you will be motivated to upgrade your bow sooner than you think. a one or two year old flagship isn't all that much different than the same bow brand new, but a lot better than a mid level or entry level bow. most of the guys selling bows on here take good care of their bows because they know they are going to sell them in a year or so and want to get as much as they can towards their next purchase. every one of the 9 bows I've bought since about 2006 from the classifieds here, have been like new when I got them.
Awesome, hopefully I'll be able to check that out soon! Sound advice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I didnt see the value, nor is it realistic on my budget to buy a new bow. Instant loss of value. A good used bow is definitely not a bad way to go. Especially if you're hunting with it. If it isn't in perfect cosmetic condition, you won't sweat using it
Definitely want to take a swing at hunting this fall. Deer season starts around September here in Washington State.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Being you're kinda new to archery, I would highly recommend getting yourself fitted by a qualified tech before you spend a dime. I'm talking from experience here. My first compound back in 91 i bought at a swap meet for $30.. Back then I had no idea what I was doing. That bow was way too long for me, the arrows were all wrong and full length. I missed several deer that year.lol
Get fitted. if you can afford it buy from a good reputable dealer that can help you get started right. I wish i did back then.
There will be plenty of time to buy used. Crap, I must have 15 bows now.
Thats just my opinion.
good luck brother
I went to a bow shop to figure out what my draw length is. The guy didn't use the methods I've seen used online but we determined that my draw length is 28.5 inches. I am 5'11".

I can draw 60 pounds pretty easily. 70 pounds is exhausting after 15 shots, my shots get super shaky.

As I've been reading I don't know what length bow I want axle to axle.

Do you think I should go with 30 or 34? Really interested in a used Hoyt carbon spyder.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,013 Posts
Shoot a bunch of them and pick the one you like......That said, once you determine your CORRECT draw length and the draw weight you can pull easily, you could get that brand new flagship for about 1/2 price here on AT...albeit without a warranty, so that is something else to consider.

Welcome in brother!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
i was in the same boat as you a while back and i decided on a entry level bow for the adjustability. That way i could start slow and adjust as my form got better and i got stronger. Plus im planning on using my entry level bow for bowfishing when i upgrade to a more premium model. But if you are dead-set i would recommend a higher end older model bow. Doesn't seem like there's been a massive increase in bow technology in a few years, so i don't think you miss out too much buying an older bow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,308 Posts
Most will recommend getting a used bow and that is pretty smart. But if it doesn't fit you, it can get expensive buying new modules or in some case, cams to make it fit. If you are brand new, it might be better to get a super adjustable bow, get it to where it fits you and how you shoot, then later you can upgrade knowing exactly what you are looking for. And you can find great deals on new, old stock bows all the time. You can get an older but brand new Elite Impulse or Option series on ebay right now for about $300. If you want a newer Ritual series, they are about $600. So there are deals to be had.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
542 Posts
I went to a bow shop to figure out what my draw length is. The guy didn't use the methods I've seen used online but we determined that my draw length is 28.5 inches. I am 5'11".

I can draw 60 pounds pretty easily. 70 pounds is exhausting after 15 shots, my shots get super shaky.

As I've been reading I don't know what length bow I want axle to axle.

Do you think I should go with 30 or 34? Really interested in a used Hoyt carbon spyder.
I’m 5’11 and shoot 29, so I’m sire that 28.5 is about right. Some bows draw a hair longer than stated also.

As far as ATA length, I shoot a shorter bow because I’m just a hunter. I know the more experienced shooters on here would say that a longer ATA will give more balance, better string angle, and other reasons I’m sure. I shoot a realm and have a destroyer as a backup. They are in the 30 and 32 ata area, respectively.

If you like the spyder, draw, vibe, overall feel, etc, then go for it. Not sure if that is at your local shop or what but I’d check classified here for prices and make sure you are not being overcharged. Some shops are pretty steep. However they may do a full setup and tune for you if you purchase from them, and that’s worth $50 or so...

Good luck, have fun.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
152 Posts
I think for a first bow you should go to your local archery shop and buy a new one
They will fit you with what works for you and alot of times they coach you in form plus you might make some new friends
 

·
I like elk!
Joined
·
17,188 Posts
I think for a first bow you should go to your local archery shop and buy a new one
They will fit you with what works for you and alot of times they coach you in form plus you might make some new friends

Then again, many shops have no clue what their doing,and you’re just another sale.

Just figure out your draw length,and buy a used flagship.
Buying a bow new, especially flagships, is tossing $500 out the window for the same exact thing you can pickup in the classifieds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,796 Posts
on the contrary,....if you are new to archery,...it is/can be, a huge investment. if you don't know if you want to stay with it yet, it's hard to justify the initial cost, as well. a used flagship bow as I stated above, will be less expensive and better than a mid level or entry level bow and will give you the experience of shooting good equipment as you learn to shoot. shooting good equipment that works right and has the performance you want, will/can go a long way to influencing your decision about staying with the sport. as with any endeavor that involves mechanical operation, the better the tool, the better the results and a easier they are to obtain. I've spent my life as woodworker, using tools of all quality levels and I can assure you the more expensive tools that are built well and work correctly, are miles above less expensive tools, in ease of use and ease of obtaining the desired quality of results from their use . a bow is nothing more than a "tool", used to launch a projectile through the air. the better it does that task and the more reliable it is about doing it well, the better and easier you are going to become proficient with it. the easier a time you have getting there, the more likely you will make the decision to stay with it. here's a little story that I witnessed just recently......my daughter is a very good shot. she recently laid out $800 and bought her first brand new bow, a mid-level target bow from one of the well known. top manufacturers. of course, she was all excited about how nice her new bow was. well, over the period of about 6 months she started having second thoughts because the bow was just not giving her the performance she thought it should. as she used it she discovered that the grip angle and general construction, just didn't quite work for her, despite having shot a demo bow at the store, she discovered that the bow was super sensitive to grip contact. she decided to buy a different bow made by a different company and a two year old flagship. as soon as she started shooting it, she started shooting better scores,...scores that she is used to seeing herself shoot. this bow was only half the price of the new mid-level bow she recently bought and decided to replace. she has since bought another bow of the same manufacture, another flagship, used of course from here,... so she has a dedicated bow for target and for hunting/3d. she only has 100 dollars more in both of her current bows than she had in the previous one she just replaced, after luckily being able to sell the brand new mid-level bow in just a matter of a few days. now, of course,...people are going to say, "well that previous bow, just didn't fit her",....well, it did with the exception of being very grip sensitive which cannot be discovered with a few shots in a shop. the point is ,....the flagship bows whether new or bought used, are designed better and perform better than the mid-level bows. there are big differences in the designs between mid-level and flagship bows, that you don't necessarily notice with short term use or trying one at a shop. you're always better off getting a flagship, whether new or used.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,148 Posts
Buy what YOU want... I buy bows new and used. I've bought 7 New bows and 6 used bows in my "archery life".... I suspect I will by more of each by the time I'm too old to shoot....

I personally don't like to "settle". When I'm shopping for a new truck, I already know what I want and don't let the salesman talk me into a different color just because that's what he has in-stock. If I'm spending my hard-earned $$$, I want what I want. (I have been swayed by seeing the truck in person vs a picture on the internet)

For me, it's the same with bows.... If I want a certain color, I'll order it and wait a few weeks to come in. When you shop exclusively on the used market, you have to get "lucky" to find the exact bow you want or "settle" for a color option that you don't "love".
 
1 - 20 of 32 Posts
Top