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What altitude, and what does your outfitter recommend or say about night time temps? Sept can still be relatively warm in the mountains, but so far this year has been rather cooler and pretty wet [at least here in S.E. Wyo]. How much weight has your outfitter restricted you to, and how much does your gear weigh thus far? How large will the wall shelter be, and how many people will it sleep? There is warmth in numbers in close quarters.

Consider looking into, above the sleeping bag, a fleece bag liner; a good one can easily lower the bag rating 10+ degrees, is light weight/small to pack, and can be removed if conditions are warmer than you expect.

A little heavy since weight is a concern, but also check out your local army surplus store for military sleeping bags; not as "pack friendly" as some of the expensive commercial ones as far as weight and pack space, but warm as Yuma in July.

If these sort of outings are going to continue in your future, buy once cry once and get something quality that's going to last.
 

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Have you checked any classifieds for a used bag? Sounds gross but just pay to have it professionally dry cleaned. I snagged a North Face that retails for $500 on CL for $50. Paid another $30 to have it professionally dry cleaned and felt like I won.

I am of zero help to you though about telling you what works or doesn't work. I am a hot sleeper. It was snowing 3 years ago when I was in Grand Mesa, CO elk hunting and I still unzipped my bag to cool off. I also have never slept in a wall tent...just my 2 man Mountain Hardwear which I feel like keeps me very warm as well.

Have fun on your trip. You will be hooked.
 

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If weight is an issue, I change my pad choice to an exped down 7 in the long wide. The quilts are good if you are active. The Kifaru slick bag is a good option for synthetic and the marmot trestles can be found for a good price.
 

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First thing I'd be making arrangements for the packer to be hauling in a little Sims or similar woodstove, and having a decent amount of good dry firewood at camp when you arrive. Split, stacked and covered with a tarp.

Even if it isn't terribly cold at night, an occasional small fire in the tent helps keep the floor and fabrics dry and cozy.
To me that will add a dimension of overall comfort that no amount of money spent on a sleep system can match.

(Not saying you should cheap out on your sleep system.)
Do both.
 

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If you're packing in it matters. If you're driving in (the wall tent suggests this is the case) it matters less because you can easily bring an extra blanket or even a catalytic heater.
 

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I'm not sure about your sleeping bag, but I can tell you that you have chosen wisely on your hunt dates! I have hunted Colorado many years and the last week of the season always seems to be the best as far as bugling is concerned. I know a lot of folks can't wait for the season to open and rush out the opening week. They are usually very disappointed with the lack of bugling and rut activity.

My main recommendation would be to not overdress, dress in layers and take a couple pair of good hiking boots. If you get a pair wet, which you probably will, you can dry them out while wearing the other pair. You will walk a LOT. You do not need any insulated clothing, in my opinion. I normally only wear 6 pocket pants and a long sleeve T while elk hunting. A lot of mornings I start out wearing a stocking cap, thin gloves and fleece vest, but take them off as the sun rises and I warm up from walking. I personally hate getting over heated and sweating. If the temps do drop and it stays cold you can add base layers under your camo for additional warmth.

Also, I HIGHLY recommend the Ultimate Predator Cow Elk Decoy. These decoys easily attach to your bow and are a game changer! I once walked to within 60 yards of a nice 5x5 and about a dozen cows while they watched me approach from at least 150 yards out. The last bull I shot I got 3 arrows in using this decoy. They are definitely worth it. They don't weigh anything and easily fold down to about the size of paper plate when not on your bow. Good luck!

Ulitmate Predator Decoy Colorado 2017.PNG
 

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If you're packing in it matters. If you're driving in (the wall tent suggests this is the case) it matters less because you can easily bring an extra blanket or even a catalytic heater.
^
In a follow-up posting, the OP mentioned that they were going in on packhorses.
The packer's job is to get all the gear necessary for a reasonably comfortable camp to the site.

Make him earn it, although it's reasonable to expect to pay a bit more if the contract has already specified a certain weight limit total.
He's got to cover the extra time and maybe the rental of an additional horse or two.

A note on catalytic etc. heaters: carbon monoxide- bad.
Vent correctly.
Same with a woodstove of course but generally more obvious.
The ones I've used have a a damper and stackable chimney sections that run through a fireproof ring sewn into the ceiling fabric.
(Cap with a spark arrestor and be aware of other local restrictions if wildfires are a possibility during your stay.)
 

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If you're in a wall tent, get a cot. It will keep you off the floor and cold air layer near the floor.
If you're not camping terribly high, then it won't be that cold, but if there's a stove in the tent, then you will be more than warm in any case if Sept patterns hold.

Good luck
 

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My experience of staying warm in a wall tent during late September chilly nights is to bring a nice thick blanket, double it over and place on top of a foam cushion, and then put my sleeping bag on TOP of it. You have to insulate yourself from the ground really well or it'll leach the heat right out of you. As long as I do that I stay nice and warm and don't need a blanket on top of my sleeping bag.
I've only used a cot once 20 some years ago, remember freezing that night and thinking it was from the cot allowing cold air to get 360° around me...but it was probably more because I was a early 20 something kid that had a $25 sleeping bag.
I'd rather sleep on the ground and insulate under me really well.
 

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Corripe Cervisiam
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A $38 bag rated for -20* is realistically a 30* bag.

If you’re sleeping in a wall tent, buy a cot and bring a bunch of blankets and don’t worry about your sleep system.
Sleep systems only really start to matter when you sleep in a tent, far from your vehicle.

The 4.4 R value is the capacity of an insulating material to resist heat flow.
The higher the R value, the warmer the material
I use a 3.2 R value pad, all season long, at 10,500’, on the ground..and keep warm.

If you’re on a cot, in a wall tent, it’s not even the same thing. Buy a comfy cot, the cheap -20 bag(or bring a bunch of quilts/blankets)... bring a pillow, and sleep soundly.
Some good advice here. I've froze my butt off in cheap sleeping bags in the past.

I've spent the last 3 decades plus in the elk mountains in September......you will be addicted.

Even with a cot you need a good pad.

I'm surprised so many guys like the Klymit pad- my hunting buddy dumped his- cold coming right through it.

Best pads are Exped and Thermarest. Lots of Quality bags with Western Mountaineering being the cream of the crop.
 

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A good pad is the most important part of staying warm. And sleeping on a cot is colder than sleeping on the ground (a cot lets the cold air circle you 360) so if you are using a cot then the pad is even more important.

In late September you could get mild night time temps (20s to 30s) or extremely cold temps. Be ready for any temp.
 

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Feedn The Geese
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Color me crazy here as most probably do but you spent 3 years and how much on this hunt? Id guess you have at least $5000 in this and youre worried about spending money on your sleeping bag? If you dont sleep, youre gonna have a terrible time.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
Actually the way we are doing this it will be way less than $5000.00. And Im not trying to skimp on a sleeping bag. But I'm not spending big bucks on it when I can get something on sale. I was really asking for recommendations on a bag and a pad. The cots are there for us to use. The wood burns up very quickly. The way I hear it its gone in an hour or so. And I was talking about the Klymit insulated Static V.
 

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Discussion Starter #38
And the bag I mentioned is $230.00 normally. I found it on a sight on sale for 38.00. I obviously know you cant get a warm top end sleeping bag for 38.00 dollars normally. That would be like taking my old superman bag from when I was a kid! But I really appreciate the info! Keep it coming.
By the way, this isn't something Im using every year. Once every three probably more like it.
 
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