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Hey there guys and gals of AT! Im new to the site and to bow hunting/shooting. Ive always wanted to get into it, but never really pursued it. I am looking for a little info on things I NEED vs Want in a new/slightly used bow. I have shot a hand full, Carbon Knight, Faktor, Ballistic and a few others. As of now im pretty sold on the Ballistic. Its a package deal from a pro shop that includes the warranty for 649. It feels good, great draw. I guess what im asking is a 2 part question: 1st, package deals vs bare bow. I love the Ballistic, but I can already tell I will want to replace the rest and stabilizer right away, then the sight before hunting season. Would it be a better value to buy a bare bow and put everything on it? It would end up costing just a bit more it seems and I really dont wanna wait to shoot...ITS TOO FUN. 2nd question is performance based. Im testing all the bows @ 60#'s, which feels good. It gives me a great base to compare all the bows I shoot without wearing myself out. Unfortunately, I think it takes away from the speed, which I dont know how important it is, and distance...i think. I would like to be able to shoot in competitions when I cant hunt so I would like to know what performance specs I need to have to be competitive (i know a lot is due to practice), as well as accurate when I hunt. Like I said, im new to bows and these may be silly questions, but any and all info on brands to stick with or avoid would be great. Thanks in advance!
 

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You and only you can pick your bow, you can ask for advice as far as reliability, maintance, whatever. I'd stay away from factory "package" deals, most are really cheap sights and rests, you pay for them, take them off and upgrade, it would have been cheaper not to waste the money. 60# is plenty, you could get a 65 or 70# bow and back it down until you get used to it, but 10 pounds is only good for about 10 to 15 feet per second if you are in the speed game. Competitions aren't a speed game, so to speak, ASA has limits, IBO doesn't, just 5 grains per pound. You don't have to have 360 feet per second to shoot 3-D, but you do have to be able to hit the target, speed should be your last concern. Cheers--BB
 

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You have some pretty good questions for a guy that is new to shooting a bow. I agree with the previous post. I would stay away from the package bows, espically if you are already thinkingabout changing out most of the accessories. Its a package bow and may be a good deal, but you are still paying for those accessories that you don't want to keep on the bow. Secondly, the most important thing about picking a bow is that you are comfortable with it. Speed is great, it will make up for some minor misjudgment in yardage. All things being equal, I would always rather have a bow that shoots faster than slower. But that is if all things are equal, which most of the time, if you are gaining speed, you are giving up something else. To me the most important things about a bow i shoot is that It has a smooth draw, a comfortable valley, nice feel, and that it is quiet and easy to tune. One of the last things I look at is speed.
 

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As said only YOU can pick your bow. I shoot dozens of bows sometimes multiple times before I choose a bow that fits ME. With that said, a High end bow is an expensive mistake. I would search the racks for a good MID range bow until you (1) decide your going to stick with it, (2) decide what grip suites you the best, (3) Find YOUR draw length and settle on a repeatable anchor point. Really I wouldn't spend a ton of money right out of the gate. I have been shooting for 35 years and have recently bought high end bows that the more I shot them, the more I looked for something else because the feel just wasn't right. The ballistic is a nice bow for the money, the Diamond Infinite edge is a package for around 400 that is crazy adjustable and shoots very well. For the money I would try shooting a Bowtech assassin which is also a package bow and alot of bow at that and is very popular. Also I urge you to comb the classifieds on here. You can find some very good deals on new and used bows. Whatever you choose, don't be afraid to go shoot as many bows as you can. Welcome to the world of Archery, hang on to your wallet, lol.
 

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Jrod,
Here is a link to my go to site for bow reviews.. http://compoundbowchoice.com/
I'm a newbie myself. I'm setting up my first ever bow. I went with a used PSE Vendetta DC bare. After doing a little looking around and asking questions. I got a QAD HDX rest. Arrows are being ordered from http://www.southshorearcherysupply.com/index.php I got a Hogg real deal off the classi's here for a good price. I'm into this bow for less then the cost of a new package bow and if i may say... with WAY better accessories on it.
 

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I'd get something from the best Archery Shop that's close to you (not a giant store like Bass Pro). You'll probably be back to the shop several times while learning the bow and archery. Get a good re-pore going with the archery shop, buy the little stuff from them too. It will pay off in the long run. I've had the most expensive bows you can buy and now I shoot just Elites. There isn't an Elite shop anywhere near me either but I know enough now to have my bows tuned and know when they're right or off. You can't know any of that when you first start out, you'll need a shop close to help.

Real expensive bows aren't any more accurate than mid-priced bows. Just pull a bunch of them and one will stand out for your body type and strengths/weaknesses. Use the Force.
 

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You have to pick the bow that you like, as for the Rth packages avoid them unless you like the items included, yes they save a few bucks initially but then when you upgrade shortly after you have to reset up your bow for the new stuff. Better off IMHO to set it up how you want it to start, then you have confidence in your equipment.
 

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You and only you can pick your bow, you can ask for advice as far as reliability, maintance, whatever. I'd stay away from factory "package" deals, most are really cheap sights and rests, you pay for them, take them off and upgrade, it would have been cheaper not to waste the money. 60# is plenty, you could get a 65 or 70# bow and back it down until you get used to it, but 10 pounds is only good for about 10 to 15 feet per second if you are in the speed game. Competitions aren't a speed game, so to speak, ASA has limits, IBO doesn't, just 5 grains per pound. You don't have to have 360 feet per second to shoot 3-D, but you do have to be able to hit the target, speed should be your last concern. Cheers--BB
I agree with everything Bourbon said.....except the part about the package deal. You asked the question of what you NEED vs. what you want. I'm sure you want an upgraded sight, rest, etc. but is by no means a NEED. I bought the Carbon Knight package myself and shoot just fine.
 

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I wish I had gotten a bare bow cuz I replaced the rest and sight right away....but being a newbie didnt know they were available...hey guys/gals, do bare bows come with full warranties?? just wondering for my next bow...
 

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bowandsnow, yeah bare bows still come with full warranties. most of your higher end bows are sold as bare bow anyway and all have "lifetime" warranties
 

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I would have to agree with staying away from the package deal. There is no sense in paying for those items if before you have purchased them you are planning on replacing them. 60lbs is more than enough especially starting out you will more than likely tire quicker than you think you will even at the poundage in the first phases of beginning archery. Concentrate on good form and accuracy, speed will help you in 3d if you misjudge yardage but I would rather shoot a slower bow and make good shots than just clip it and rip it hitting close enough. Shoot as many bows as you can shoot them as many times as you can and don't get all caught up in the hype of certain bows or manufacturers. Get what suites you and what feels right. Good luck and welcome to the great sport of archery
 

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Tell your dealer to set up all the bows at your draw length, 60lb draw weight or less, and shoot them. You will know what feels right too you and what doesn't. The bow will pick you.
 

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Nothin wrong with used bow but I would buy from a pro shop so you could put what acceries you want and have it set up to fit you.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Lots of great suggestions! Im going back to the pro shop in a little bit to shoot a few more brands/models. I really try not to be a "brand chaser", and I hope I can keep that mentality as I start bow hunting/shooting. I guess its not really a "high-end" bow that im looking for, I just know that the old saying "you get what you pay for" tends to comeback on me...at least it did when it comes to AR parts. I have noticed that certain brands have trends when it comes to a lot of the models they provide; ie. smooth draw and solid wall. I can already see that this is where I will go back and forth with many times. When I started shooting, way, way back on Monday, I thought I wanted the security of a solid wall...which I found with a few brands. Then I shot a Faktor and loved how smooth the draw was. It didnt seem to have the sudden let-off that the others did but the smoothness of the draw made 60# seem like 40.

I can see this will be a very expensive hobby :BangHead: but im really excited! Again thanks for all the info!
 

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Here's another question I forgot to post.. I will learn how to control the relief (not sure if thats the right way to say it)? Basically not have the sudden clunk at the relief point. Ive been trying to pull back with as little movement as required which is how I assume you need to when hunting. I seem to make a smooth, easy pull then all the sudden I hit the relief point and the bow jumps...throwing off my aim point and causing more movement. I know a single cam will help with that, but I like the pull of a double..
 

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Don't forget to try a Hoyt Charger. At $500 bare bow, it's a steal. They do offer a package deal for $650 with Fuse accessories, but they probably won't impress. Good arrows and practicing often will really make any bow mentioned so far a nail driver.
 

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Here's another question I forgot to post.. I will learn how to control the relief (not sure if thats the right way to say it)? Basically not have the sudden clunk at the relief point. Ive been trying to pull back with as little movement as required which is how I assume you need to when hunting. I seem to make a smooth, easy pull then all the sudden I hit the relief point and the bow jumps...throwing off my aim point and causing more movement. I know a single cam will help with that, but I like the pull of a double..
Are you talking about the draw cycle in particular? Generally there's a hump/hill (where the poundage peaks), then the valley (let-off kicks in), then the wall (when you hit the draw stops or you anchor). Some bows have harsh humps and valleys, some have short valleys, some have soft or hard walls... they are all a little different.

If you cannot draw a bow STRAIGHT back (meaning you point the bow at the ground or the sky when you draw it) then you are over-bowed and it's too much weight. Just because you can draw back a lot of poundage doesn't mean you should. But if it's minimal struggle and you aren't used to it, that's acceptable because you will eventually build those muscles needed.

In today's bows, I don't notice a huge difference in how a single cam versus a hybrid or dual or binary cam feels. Generally though the single cams are a little easier but often they are slower bows.
 
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