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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In theory, the wife and I will both shoot it. I'm fine with beginning at low poundage. I figure my longer draw length will result in a slightly heavier draw anyway.
I'd like to get something inexpensive (<$200) initially, but decent enough to enjoy and use for a bit, and maybe move to the grandsons as they get old enough to handle it.

My original theory was to get SWA Spyder @20#. They are out of them and have no idea when they'll get more. I could get a Sage from Lancaster.

I've also seen what I'm assuming are some Chinese bows named as good/decent buys here (Black Hunter and TBOW?). Now I'm wondering if those are good or if I should wait for the SWA Spyder or if there are others that are decent beginners, budget bows that I should look at that are available.

Yes, it would be great to go try stuff, but that's probably not going to happen.

Thanks for your thoughts.
 

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can you provide some details on your, and your wife's, physical characteristics? Height, age, strength, etc.? I'm significantly taller than my wife and a bow for me is totally inappropriate for her, let alone a child. A 20 pound bow for an average adult man is kind of absurd, and you may find it so boring that you just give it up without really giving archery a chance. Just some thoughts.
 

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answering mg1 may change what makes sense for you but . . .

As you mention, one "go to" in beginners bows is Samick Sage (and its probable clones in US)

Bolt on limbs are really cheap, so you can easily/cheaply adapt the bow draw weight to suit. If you went down the ILF riser / limb route it increases costs quite a bit - but still offers flexibility with changing limbs

My teenage daughter started with a 25lb Sage, but I put on 18lb bolt on limbs initially, then went to 22lb, then we put on the original 25lb limbs and added an 8125 string after about 18 months - works really nicely in 3D to 30yd (and ok to 40yds+, she hit a 3D Elk at 75 yards last weekend).

The grip is one of the comfiest I have ever held, its light enough for kids to use but might be a little dainty if you have big hands. Sage riser can take sights, wire rest / plunger if you want

A slightly left field alternative might be Oakridge Ash hybrid 1 piece, cheap as chips, you could buy a light draw to start and then get another one as your form improves. Super light in the hand, almost nothing to go wrong. Of all the cheap Chinese 1 piece bows this is possibly the nicest shooting experience - though I have not shot any of the cheap Chinese recurves
 

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I have a Samick Sage and a Sage Elite. I think they are really good bows, especially for the price. I also have a Spyder. These are also very good bows for the price. 62 inch bows will fit most adults and kids can shoot them too.

Twig archery is a small shop in Ohio. He probably has all these bows in stock.

The stock string on these bows is the only weak point. It will wear out pretty quick, but that is an easy fix, with a better quality string.
 

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EDIT - just looked at US prices on Ash, they used to be just over £110 (that's what I paid last year, and £90 for Sage the year before that. Dollar price similar) - now they seem a lot more expensive, though Sage is still a sensible price . . .
 

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The “Black Hunter” series of bows have become the new go to bow for those starting out or those compound guys wanting to give traditional a try. In the past you could buy through Amazon at 80.00-120.00 and end up with a great shooting bow or one that the limbs gave out in the first 1K shots. Basically hit or miss. Or you could buy from Lancaster Archery (called the Ember) or Twig Archery (still called the Black Hunter) for around 200.00 and get a higher quality bow. (Same bow as Amazon just better fit and finish). At ETAR last weekend I saw that Big Jim’s custom bows now have their own versions of this popular bow. The “Elite” and the “Special “ and they were flying out of his booth all week. The Elite is 60” and has a black and red wood riser (very nice looking @ 139.00) and the “Special “ is your basic Black Hunter in a green finished wood riser ( @129.00) Biggest thing here is if you know anything of Big Jim’s quality reputation you could feel safe buying a lesser priced bow and know that he will back it. Both bows are available in 30# @ 28” and if your wife is of average height she will probably draw between 24”-26” …my wife is 5’ 7” and draws 26.5” and my 30#Black Hunter is 25# at her draw length.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
can you provide some details on your, and your wife's, physical characteristics? Height, age, strength, etc.? I'm significantly taller than my wife and a bow for me is totally inappropriate for her, let alone a child. A 20 pound bow for an average adult man is kind of absurd, and you may find it so boring that you just give it up without really giving archery a chance. Just some thoughts.
My wife's draw should be ~26-26.5". My draw should be ~29". I've been thinking that the difference in draw length would mean that she would come in under the 28" draw weight and I would come in a bit over that weight. We are in our 50s and in reasonable shape. I'm stronger than my wife for sure.

Why would a low draw weight be boring? We got one of the grandsons one of the really cheap, ambi, fiberglass Bear bows. I've used it a few times to see how it shot before having him use it and to show him some things. It's surprisingly fun at close range, and probably only has an 8-10# draw.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The “Black Hunter” series of bows have become the new go to bow for those starting out or those compound guys wanting to give traditional a try. In the past you could buy through Amazon at 80.00-120.00 and end up with a great shooting bow or one that the limbs gave out in the first 1K shots. Basically hit or miss. Or you could buy from Lancaster Archery (called the Ember) or Twig Archery (still called the Black Hunter) for around 200.00 and get a higher quality bow. (Same bow as Amazon just better fit and finish). At ETAR last weekend I saw that Big Jim’s custom bows now have their own versions of this popular bow. The “Elite” and the “Special “ and they were flying out of his booth all week. The Elite is 60” and has a black and red wood riser (very nice looking @ 139.00) and the “Special “ is your basic Black Hunter in a green finished wood riser ( @129.00) Biggest thing here is if you know anything of Big Jim’s quality reputation you could feel safe buying a lesser priced bow and know that he will back it. Both bows are available in 30# @ 28” and if your wife is of average height she will probably draw between 24”-26” …my wife is 5’ 7” and draws 26.5” and my 30#Black Hunter is 25# at her draw length.
My wife is about the same size as yours with probably ~26-26.5" draw. So the draw weight is 5# lighter at 1.5" less than 28. I would have thought the difference was larger. Then if I'm drawing 29-29.5" then I'd probably see a similar increase or would the "stacking" phenomenon make it even more?
 

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My wife is about the same size as yours with probably ~26-26.5" draw. So the draw weight is 5# lighter at 1.5" less than 28. I would have thought the difference was larger. Then if I'm drawing 29-29.5" then I'd probably see a similar increase or would the "stacking" phenomenon make it even more?
Most of the info above is good, but stacking is an issue on some bows.

The Samick Sage for instance stacks pretty quickly after you pass 28". I had a Samick Journey that is like the Spyder XL, and it did fine with my 29" draw length. I have shot the regular Spyder and I could feel it hit the stacking wall (same as when I shot a Sage). The problem with stack isn't that your draw weight goes up, but that you pull harder with no benefit. The extra weight on your fingers is spent pulling against the bow, and not in loading the string with more potential energy. At 64" the Spyder XL is not too long for your wife, and it would work better for both of you if you are sharing it. I'm guessing that a 25lb bow would come in around 27lbs for you, and 22 for your wife.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Most of the info above is good, but stacking is an issue on some bows.

The Samick Sage for instance stacks pretty quickly after you pass 28". I had a Samick Journey that is like the Spyder XL, and it did fine with my 29" draw length. I have shot the regular Spyder and I could feel it hit the stacking wall (same as when I shot a Sage). The problem with stack isn't that your draw weight goes up, but that you pull harder with no benefit. The extra weight on your fingers is spent pulling against the bow, and not in loading the string with more potential energy. At 64" the Spyder XL is not too long for your wife, and it would work better for both of you if you are sharing it. I'm guessing that a 25lb bow would come in around 27lbs for you, and 22 for your wife.
Great, thank you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
i have a SW Spyder 62" recurve.
it is fantastic!
i have not tuned any arrows to it yet, but as far as a very nice shooting/feeling bow....it is 👍
And that is why that was what I was going to get. I haven't seen anything but good reviews of them. I'd even planned to get one for my wife and I and one of the smaller ones for the grandson, but by the time the CFO said "OK, order it" they were sold out and now have no idea when more are coming.
 

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And that is why that was what I was going to get. I haven't seen anything but good reviews of them. I'd even planned to get one for my wife and I and one of the smaller ones for the grandson, but by the time the CFO said "OK, order it" they were sold out and now have no idea when more are coming.
ah crap!:(
be patient, and watch the classifieds too.
best of luck 👍
 

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Im 99.99 percent sure the SWA Spider is a Chinese bow as are the Galaxies. The Lancaster Galaxies and the SWA bows are both good. I probably wouldnt buy a Chinese bow from a no name company because you dont have anyone guaranteeing that it is marked right and not a second.

If you try sharing one bow - you will need different arrows. And Im guessing that after a few week you will feel the bow is too light for you.
 

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Cant seem to reply to post - "Why would a low draw weight be boring?"

depends what you are doing, what you are expecting, but . . .

In my experience (having played with low power fibreglass bows in the garden when the kids were small, bows at under 20lb (and cheap arrows) don't offer any real accuracy, partly because small variations in technique can make a bigger different to accuracy and also because the arrow path is much more arced, which you will notice sooner at lower power. Still fun plinking bean tins off a wall at 10yds mind

- if you want to develop your skill as an archer (with decent anchor / release, good grouping etc) then you will appreciate "proper" kit with a bit of power (the difference from 20 to 25 to 30lb is very noticeable in terms of accuracy IME). From 25lb you can look at 20 - 30 yards+, hitting golds or 3Ds with some repeatability

If you can only draw 20lb (we have a tiny lady at our club with shoulder issues who draws 18lb) then you can get accurate but will likely need to have some ultralight matched arrows
 

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Black Hunter (sold as Galaxy Ember also). No better starter bow (seasoned archers love them too), bang for buck, IMO. I have helped many people, men and women, to traditional archery over the years, and it is this bow which has helped build confidence the fastest. It is very much a point and shoot bow, with great hand-torque resistance and all round performance.
 

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I have the 66" Galaxy Bullseye from Lancaster. I bought 26-28# limbs. Perfect low poundage adult bow. Im shooting out to 30 yds. My wife , and my mentally handicapped adult sister all shoot this bow. Cant beat the great quality for the little money.




I also bought an inexpensive SAS target sight. It's much easier for novice shooters to quickly dial in a distance zero when allowing different people to shoot one bow.

 

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I think all of the bows mentioned would make good starter bows. One thing I didn't see was how you planned to shoot. If you plan to shoot Instinctive any of the options given would work and be shareable. If you want to use a sight, it gets a little trickier. The Southwest Archery/Sage clones already have the inserts installed, but some of the others do not. It might be more reasonable to each have a bow if using a sight. A pin set up for your anchor and draw most likely will not be on target for her. Some sights the entire sight moves to adjust the left/right impact. That would make sharing difficult. It could still be done with each of you using a different pin on the sight. I just think shooting this way it would be easier and more enjoyable if you each had your own gear.
 
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