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i was lookign to make the transition from compound to traditional as compound shooting isnt going very well for mebut im looking to sell my compound or trade it i was thinking of a hoyt dorado used of cource? but any thoughts on makign the transition or possibly a good recurve to go with?
 

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Knowing what I know now, buy a Quinn. They are cheap and shoot as good or better than anything out there. Like I stated in another thread, I have spent a lot of coin on custom and production bows and you simply will not find another bow that offers this much bang for your buck.
 

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My advice is to try several recurves before you buy, preferably as many as possible. There is no bad bow. There is no good bow. Bad bows are bows which are not suitable for you and good bows are suitable for you. You will regognize a good bow when you'll shoot it. Start with a low poundage, 35 lbs will do just fine. Buy secondhand, in this way you will save a lot of money. When you are a year or two further, you could decide to buy a new one in a heavier draw-weight.

Find yourself a coach, he will help you in tuning your arrows (which is at least as important as your bow) and train you in a proper technique

I whïsh you a bright future!
 

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My advice is to try several recurves before you buy, preferably as many as possible. There is no bad bow. There is no good bow. Bad bows are bows which are not suitable for you and good bows are suitable for you. You will regognize a good bow when you'll shoot it. Start with a low poundage, 35 lbs will do just fine. Buy secondhand, in this way you will save a lot of money. When you are a year or two further, you could decide to buy a new one in a heavier draw-weight.

Find yourself a coach, he will help you in tuning your arrows (which is at least as important as your bow) and train you in a proper technique

I whïsh you a bright future!
Best advice offered in response to a frequently asked question...which no one but the individual shooter can answer for him or herself. Shoot as many as you can and then YOU decide. If you go by what someone else says is "The Best", then more often than not...you're going to wind up finding yourself very disappointed:cry:
 

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Don't beat me up here guys....

I recently went thru the same dilema. I grew tired of my compound, it just wasn't a "challenge" anymore... My friend in another state had started shooting a recurve a couple years prior, and I finally got "the bug".

I looked into "custom" bows, but you really can't shoot them first(and I didn't know what I wanted)..

I bought a Hoyt Dorado as my first bow for a couple of reasons:

1. "Instant gratification"- You can usually take them home that night!!
2. I heard they were good bows, from several people on AT
3. They were HALF the price of a custom bow!!

I'm glad I bought the Dorado first... what a GREAT bow!! I don't think you could go wrong with a Quinn Stallion either, although I've never seen or shot one..
 

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Twig,
used is definitely the way to go. there are lots of good used bows out there. I don't own nor have ever shot the Hoyt Dorado, but it does look good and gets good reviews.

As others have said, it's all very personal. But, maybe ask yourself some questions and see what you like. one piece or take down? I personally like one piece, but if I travelled lots with a bow I'd consider a take down. Wood or other stuff? I know, most of them have other stuff in them, but I meant a traditional wood look, like my Mamba, or more modern looking like the dorado. Longbow or recurve?

Then the arrows. Wood or aluminum (or carbon in some cases)? I got into traditional assuming that it had to be wood. I learned later that was not a requirement, but I still use wood because it's what I started with, and like it.

As for suggestions, get something relatively inexpensive with a relatively low poundage, but maybe still legal weight for hunting. Some say lighter to develop form. Maybe true. I did not know any better and started with a Nirk Rebel 45# @28" which is 40# for me at my 26" draw. It's fun, legal for hunting here in FL, and was light enough for me to learn. Recently I added a Howatt Mamba 55# (50# for me).

Enjoy your search and welcome to the trad world! Warning - it is addicting!
 

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One thing you will notice if you get a chance to shoot several bows. No matter how you "aim" instinctive , gap , gapstinctive (kind of a mix) you will find that some bows seem to shoot a bit to the right and some to the left, and some down the middle.If you are a right handed shooter stay away from the ones that shoot comsistently left. There is some adjusting you can do(Rick welch's volume three dvd has a great explanation of adjusting the bow to hit where your looking) but if the bow hits left even with a soft strike plate in the sight window, you're out of options and it will drive you crazy. This is the big advantage of the metal riser bows like the Quinn and Hoyt. Their risers are cut 5/16" past center shot so its almost certain that you will have to build out the strike plate or adjust a little left if you shoot off an elevated rest. And that is a good thing.

Where the bow naturally hits windage wise is the main factor in all my bow buying decisions.Beauty can be a factor too, but ther is nothing prettier than your arrow flying exactly to its mark!!!


Ike
 

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Don't beat me up here guys....

I recently went thru the same dilema. I grew tired of my compound, it just wasn't a "challenge" anymore... My friend in another state had started shooting a recurve a couple years prior, and I finally got "the bug".

I looked into "custom" bows, but you really can't shoot them first(and I didn't know what I wanted)..

I bought a Hoyt Dorado as my first bow for a couple of reasons:

1. "Instant gratification"- You can usually take them home that night!!
2. I heard they were good bows, from several people on AT
3. They were HALF the price of a custom bow!!

I'm glad I bought the Dorado first... what a GREAT bow!! I don't think you could go wrong with a Quinn Stallion either, although I've never seen or shot one..
No beating you up. In fact, I am glad your FIRST turned out to be your BEST. And that is not the case for many people, although some get lucky. There is one thing you stated that needs correcting, I think, and that is a Hoyt Dorado being "half the price of a custom bow!!" That may be true as far as the Hoyt being half the cost of the custom bows that you looked at, but there are lots of custom bowyers out there that can make you a brand new custom bow, with all options(wood choices, inserts, etc.), for less than a new Hoyt. Two of my fave examples are Kohannah Bows and Chek-Mate...in many cases, you can have a new one custom made for you for under $500

And if money is the issue, I'm not sure whether or not we should even start talking about the virtual gems of shooters that can be found on the used market---I'd put an old Howatt Hunter against most of today's brand-spankin' new ones, and put my money on the Hunter in many cases...
 

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Traditional Shoot

Go to a trad shoot there is a ton of bowyers that will let you shoot their bows. Or, you can go to cabelas and shoot their ready made bows. The only problem there is limited stock. I personally think the Predator bows by Ron Pittsley are second to none for someone making a compound transition. They are smokin fast and Ron is a cool guy to deal with too. However, I have never shot a trad bow i did not like. I wish i was rich.
 
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