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Discussion Starter #1
The landowner whom I lease from is having a new gas line buried along an existing right of way and will be re-planted with grasses of some types. I'm assuming it will be either rye or bermuda maybe even wheat/rye mixture. He's asking me what i think should be planted when this work is done. Should i see if they could throw down some clover as well?

Also... they are apparently going to re-seed and fertilize. Is there a standard amount of fertilizer or seed per acre that one should go by? Like so many pounds per acre and such.

So... I'm in need of some advice from those that know better than I... any suggestions?

HELP!

Rick
 

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The landowner whom I lease from is having a new gas line buried along an existing right of way and will be re-planted with grasses of some types. I'm assuming it will be either rye or bermuda maybe even wheat/rye mixture. He's asking me what i think should be planted when this work is done. Should i see if they could throw down some clover as well?

Also... they are apparently going to re-seed and fertilize. Is there a standard amount of fertilizer or seed per acre that one should go by? Like so many pounds per acre and such.

So... I'm in need of some advice from those that know better than I... any suggestions?

HELP!

Rick
I'd do a tall prairie mix. Bluestem & Indian?
 

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corn:tongue:
 

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From a wildlife standpoint, definitely not bermuda. It's too thick for birds to walk and feed through. I'd do some research into native prairie grass blends. Bluestem and indian grass are good for native birds, and as you said, you might throw in some clover for other animals. Oats or wheat would also work well. Even just disking and mowing idle ground two or three times a year can make a good native food plot. Disking breaks up clumps of exotic grass and encourages native seeds already in the ground to grow, and mowing keeps down undesirable weeds and large plants that block sunlight. You really can't go wrong when restoring native grasses, just be careful not to introduce anything that you would not like to see there permanently. Good luck!
 

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Service help

Contact your local county extension service. There is usually one in every county. These people have the information to help you and can also go through the calculations for the amount of fertilizer you should use. If you use clover (or other legume) fertilization is very different than if you just plant a grass.
 

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stay away from fescues. Very little wildlife value.
 

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Contact your local county extension service. There is usually one in every county. These people have the information to help you and can also go through the calculations for the amount of fertilizer you should use. If you use clover (or other legume) fertilization is very different than if you just plant a grass.
+1
Most extension services are associated with a local state university that has an ag program. Good free information source that knows your local area.

If for some reason you don't have an extension service, locate a local Grange or Farmers co-op. Generally good info there too.
 

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We had the same thing done on our farm in WV. After the ground was reclaimed, the gas company planted clover. We've never had some many bucks nor such good quality bucks as we had the year after this was done. There were deer on those clover trails 24/7. I'd highly recommend clover based on what we've seen.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thank you guys very VERY much!

I will do some research and see what I can find out about a local county extension or hit up the guys at the coop. I would like to do some clover as well but I think they will be under a budget and probably use what is cheapest. Also the landowner is pushing me for an answer on this because the contract needs to be done so... they are pushing him.. he's pushing me.. yada yada yada!

I thank you guys again!

Rick
 

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I assume your lease is in Oklahoma, what part? Clover would probably work best in eastern OK, but not well further west. The opposite is true for some of the western native grasses (bluestem, etc).
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I assume your lease is in Oklahoma, what part? Clover would probably work best in eastern OK, but not well further west. The opposite is true for some of the western native grasses (bluestem, etc).
Its in SE oklahoma... thanks for the advice. Actually its west of McAlester, ok so not to far SE.

Thanks again!
 

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Bermudagrass, fescue, ryegrass, are all INTRODUCED species which will not be beneificial to wildlife. I would go with NATIVE species like big bluestem, little bluestem, Indiangrass, switchgrass which are native tallgrass species to Oklahoma and are beneficial to wildlife.
 

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Clover
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Bermudagrass, fescue, ryegrass, are all INTRODUCED species which will not be beneificial to wildlife. I would go with NATIVE species like big bluestem, little bluestem, Indiangrass, switchgrass which are native tallgrass species to Oklahoma and are beneficial to wildlife.
Are these just a simple spread of the seed and fertilized? Are they hardy and will they take with ease? Do you know which would be more native to the McAlester area? (SE Okla.)
 

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Depends

Bermudagrass, fescue, ryegrass, are all INTRODUCED species which will not be beneificial to wildlife. I would go with NATIVE species like big bluestem, little bluestem, Indiangrass, switchgrass which are native tallgrass species to Oklahoma and are beneficial to wildlife.
While it is true that these (bermudagrass, fescue, and ryegrass) are introduced, that has nothing to do with their benefit to wildlife. The issue with introduced species is that they can be invasive (true with bermudagrass) and push out native species or outcross with weed species. I guess it partially depends on how one defines "benefit".

Since most of the native grasses have been bred for improvement (density, tolerance to abiotic and biotic stresses), some would say that the seed you would buy now would not be considered native either. But, "native" has to do with the origin of the grass (e.g. with people, Native Americans - native, Americans - generally not native).

Work with the county extension people. They will have access to all the establishment information you will need.
 

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another vote for clover

Check the PH and lime the area if possible. For clover put down around 10 lbs per acre. Fertilizer is around 300 lbs per acre (use low nitrogen as clover produces it own - something like 6-24-24). Also, the clover seeds are so small I usually mix dry sand (sift it down to about the seed size) with the seed in the spreader so you don't run the risk of running out before you cover the area. Also, there are a lot of different clovers out there - read up on the characterisitics that you think will work best in the area. For example, white dutch is more of spreading clover and will tolerate lower mowing better than some of the others. Other clovers grow higher and might be better options if this area will not see a brush hog very often. Finally, read up on innoculation and consider getting pre-innoculated seeds for better results.
 

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If you say you are on a budget, then liming the ground will most likely not be an option. I agree with others, get in touch with your local resources. It's free advice. Also, how large of an area are you talking about?
 
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