Archery Talk Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,044 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I need some help. I just got mine in yesterday. I got it out and was going to fletch some up. Oh yea I have never done this either. Pretty simple, Right? I'am having problem getting it centered. How do I do thisand what line does the base need to be on, top,middle or bottom? Would someone who has a right hecoil and shoot 2 inch vanes let me know which line you use on the clamp. If i sound like a dum ***** I know I'am:eek: . Just trying to learn. Thanks guys.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
899 Posts
What do ya mean, getting it centered?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,044 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
It may not be called centered. I tryed and fletched a arrow last night, but when i was through, it didnt appear to have much hecoil? I just figured it wasnt centered on the jig some how. Told you dont know much about what i am doing. lol.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,642 Posts
Put the vane in the clamp so that you have sufficient clearance for fingers if you are a finger shooter. Most release shooters put them a little further back . I like to use the line that puts my vanes about 1 1/4" in front of the string at rest.

If you are not a finger shooter, it doesn't matter too much. Theoretically, the further back you put the vanes, the more leverage they have to stabilize the arrow. In real life, a half inch won't make any difference.

Fletch up a couple of arrows and if you like what you see, keep it. If not, start over. Don't sweat the details too much. You have the tools and can do it over as many times as you like.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,642 Posts
Oops, I was typing as you were posting.

Obviously I misunderstood your question.

However, my advice to use trial & error is valid. If it's not what you want, adjust and try again.

On the helical, you may want to do just one test vane at a time.

As you get more into it, you might pick up a roll of fletching tape. It's an easy way to test your settings. It's a two sided tape made primarily for feathers, but you can use it to check your centering and degree of helical. It adhers quickly and comes off easier than I would like for full time use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
899 Posts
brbowman said:
It may not be called centered. I tryed and fletched a arrow last night, but when i was through, it didnt appear to have much hecoil? I just figured it wasnt centered on the jig some how. Told you dont know much about what i am doing. lol.
I fletch two different arrows, carbon for my recurves and Easton XX75's for my compound. Both are different diameters, so I have to adjust the jig with the clamp when I switch arrows.
What I do is place the arrow into the holder and then put a feather or vane in the clamp. I put the clamp on the jig. I loosen up the the two screws on the jig (where the clamp the magnet are) and adjust it until the base of the vanes/feathers are on the arrow. After a few trial/error runs, you'll get it. It took me a few times when I got my Grayling to get it right. Just tighten up the screws when you get what you're looking for.
Hope this helps....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
When I got mine, I had a couple of trash arrows to practice on, learned a bit by doing that.

That being said, I have found that the lines you are talking about are on the same plastic that holds the magnet, right?? If so, they are used to determine the offset (line of center shaft) the fletch will be mounted on. If you align the two center marks the fletch will be centered on the shaft. If the top is off to the left or right, you get a degree or two of offset, that helps the fletch spin the shaft.

If you are doing helicals, my suggestion would be to align your magnet on both the center marks and go from there. The jig is what "turns" the fletch on the shaft.

Hope this helps!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,044 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thanks guys. I'll sure I will be back at it tonight.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top