Archery Talk Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello all,

I posted the following in the intro forum but I thought a copy and paste of some of it would be good in this section:

I first got turned on to archery at the age of 12 or so in Boy Scouts. I shot a good bit up until 16 or so (all target shooting).

I'd like to get back into tradtional archery as a hobby/recreational activity (hunting possible but unlikely). I was really scrawny then. Now I'm 27, 6' 1" and 200 lbs.

I have no idea what my draw length is anymore nor do I have any clue what I can pull. I haven't even held a bow in the past 11 years.... Any quick and easy ways to determine these numbers?

I could also use some recommendations on a decent bow to buy. I don't need any thing fancy or any thing that can bring down a helicopter. I just need something that won't warp and need to be replaced a couple of years from now. Any suggestions? I would prefer a longbow versus a recurve since that is what I have experience with (long ago though it was...)

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Well I get the whole "different strokes for different folks" thing...

But how do I determine what my draw length is? Or even where to start testing bows for pull strength?

I'm willing to spend a couple hundred on my first bow... Just tell me a brand that doesn't suck, won't snap in my face, and will last me a while if I decide it's all the bow I need.

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,045 Posts
But how do I determine what my draw length is? Or even where to start testing bows for pull strength?
You need a bow in hand to use this method. This is from the 'Tuning' section at www.bowmaker.net

Most bows draw weight is measured at 28" unless marked otherwise. The amount of force applied to your arrow that is going to make it bend is determined by the draw weight of the bow at your draw length. To measure your draw length, draw the bow and have someone mark the arrow on the back side (the side away from you) of the bow or clip a clothes pin on the shaft and slide it down the shaft till you reach full draw, then measure from the throat of the nock to that point. This is your draw length. Beware! AMO draw length is measured to the low point of the grip plus 1.75" to account for variations in riser thickness but measuring to the back will get within a 1/2" or so.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,045 Posts
I'm willing to spend a couple hundred on my first bow... Just tell me a brand that doesn't suck, won't snap in my face, and will last me a while if I decide it's all the bow I need.

Thanks!
ebay is a great place to look. I personally don't know of any brands of older longbows that should be recomended but as far as recurves go there is Bear, Ben Pearson, Wing Archery, Damon Howatt etc etc. A lot of people say "long, low draw weight and cheap" as a first bow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thanks that is very helpful! I've found a couple of archery shops in my area so hopefully I can make it out to them in the next few days.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,051 Posts
A rough "minimum" for your draw, or at least a ball park figure, would be your wingspan minus 16" divided by 2. So, your draw should be around 28.5", and you will probably find that will increase later. Less than that number and you're probably not taking advantage of natural bone structure.

I don't know if the links supplied already answered that or not. Except for the one to another AT thread, they're not working for me at the moment:(.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,287 Posts
You can find something that is better and easier to learn with on eBay.
+1

Woodbows.com seem very reasonably priced...in fact...they seem very cheaply priced.

If you're into that style bow...than go for it...but it's not what I would recommend for someone starting out unless they really wanted that style of bow.

Ray ;)
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top