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Which do you prefer?

  • Carbon Express Maxima Blue Streak

    Votes: 12 37.5%
  • Gold Tip Ultralight

    Votes: 14 43.8%
  • Gold Tip Series 22

    Votes: 7 21.9%

  • Total voters
    32
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Discussion Starter #1
I have been shooting Maxima 3D Selects since I stared 6 years ago, which, I think, are the equivalent of the newer Blue Streak Selects. They are nice, but I have been looking at Gold Tip arrows. The Series 22 and ultralights, and the pro versions of each seem like good options for what I do (3D and hunting). I would like to see which you all prefer and why.
 

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the Maxima's R quite a bit more durable. ultralite comes @ a cost. I got em all including the old style 22 series, the Maximas win hand down under everything I've tried..
 

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Depending on your dl you don't need to buy the pro series. I use to shoot the Cx they were nice but didn't hold up switched to gt and never looked back


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Depending on your dl you don't need to buy the pro series. I use to shoot the Cx they were nice but didn't hold up switched to gt and never looked back

KW1 is completely correct. The way most arrows are build the wobble they may have in a less straight model is out on the ends of the arrows. I shoot XT series arrows and I have a 26.25" carbon to carbon cut. I take equal amounts off of both ends to turn XT quality arrows in to Pros. You can if you want also do the same with the Pros and turn them into what I call a super Pro.
I have shot not only CX, Gold Tip, but also Easton and have went back to Gold Tip for good reason.
Gold Tip arrows have better design for returning to their original straightness if bent or torqued on. As for durability, that is a hard thing to judge. I have hunted with all three and found the Gold Tips always to out last the others.
The only time I ever broke Gold Tips was shooting Robinhoods or Iron Horse style targets at long ranges.

Bryce,
I hope this helps you make your decision and let me know if there is more you want to know.
 

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Apply a "bend" to both the GT and the CE carbon shafts...you know, flex the shaft and then hold that flex for a few seconds and then let go. Take both brands to a spin tester and watch the spin test; you can make your decision from there.

Do this several times, holding that "bend"/"flex" for 3-5 seconds, and then go to the spin tester...and check for wobble. "Weight forward" was debunked a while back by a well known archer.
But then again, quote:
"Arrow Straightness and the ±.00$ Factor

Most carbon arrows are advertised to have a specific straightness tolerance between .001" and .006". The straighter the arrow, the more expensive they will typically be. Before we get too deep into this topic, it's worth noting that there doesn't seem to be an accepted universal method for HOW arrow straightness is measured. Per ATA/ASTM standards, arrow straightness should be measured along the full length of the shaft minus two inches. But as we understand it, this is NOT how things actually go inside the industry. On a number of occasions, we have heard arrow companies accuse each other of cheating their straightness measurements - either by measuring only short sections of their arrows, or by obtaining their straightness numbers via undisclosed measurement methodologies. If you think the bow business is cut-throat, you should witness how the arrow companies go at it behind closed doors. To avoid being shanked at the next trade show, we'll stay neutral, and assume that everyones' arrow straightness numbers are reasonably honest and comparable.

With that said, let's examine the typical straightness "classes" of arrows. Most standard-grade carbon arrows have an advertised straightness of .005-.006". These shafts are usually marketed exclusively to the hunter and beginning archers. For the purposes of big game hunting and general target use, standard-grade shafts are more than adequate. A typical human hair is about .004"-.006" in diameter. So even a basic carbon shaft of .006" straightness is quite good, and straighter than you could possibly perceive without specialized equipment.

But ... making and selling arrows is a very competitive business. So most arrow shaft manufacturers also offer a mid-grade shafts which will have an advertised straightness of around .003-.004", and "pro" grade shafts claiming a straightness of .001-.002". And as you might expect, these premium grade arrows fetch a premium price. If you're the kind of buyer who always goes for the good stuff, then by all means, buy the straightest shaft you can find. But before you shell out the green for a ±.001 shaft, there are couple things you should know.

First, the difference in a ±.006" shaft and a ±.001" shaft is more razor-thin than you might think. Carbon arrow shafts are constructed by taking very thin layers of carbon sheets and rolling them up into perfectly straight tubes (usually 6ft. long or so), much like you might roll-up a big map. Once wound, the carbon tubes are then heat-treated to bond all the layers together. When the heating process is complete and the carbon tubes cool down to room temperature, they are cut into sections (raw shafts). Some of the shafts, particularly those that come from the center of the roll, retain their ±.001" straightness while other sections distort slightly from the heating/cooling process.

As we understand it, the results vary from run to run and day to day. In most cases, even the manufacturer doesn't know how the day's crop of shafts will come out. But once the shafts are made, the manufacturer measures the straightness of each shaft and sorts them accordingly for banding and sale. One sort may be named and marketed as one arrow, another sort as something else. For example, the Beman Bowhunter ±.006" @ $64.95 p/dz and the Beman ICS Hunter ±.003" @ $89.95 are just two different sorts of the same shaft - same raw materials - same construction technique. Same is true for the popular Gold Tip Expedition ±.006", Gold Tip XT ±.003", and the Gold Tip Pro ±.001". They're literally cut from the same cloth.

Small variations in the daily manufacturing environment (humidity, pressure, air convection patterns, etc.) along with tiny deviations in the characteristics of the raw materials ultimately determines the straightness of the finished product. On one particular day, the manufacturer might yield an entire batch of ±.001" shafts, or an entire batch no better than ±.006", or even a mixed bag of straightnesses, all from the very same processes and materials. The finer tricks of the trade are carefully guarded secrets, as the art of consistently building straighter arrow shafts is literally a technical exercise in splitting hairs. But make no mistake, arrow manufacturers would rather avoid the ±.006" days. The more ±.001" days a manufacturer has, the more money they can make. Why? Because straighter shafts, whether they cost more to manufacture or not, are worth more in the marketplace. So don't be fooled into thinking that your set of $129 ±.001" pro-grade shafts are somehow fundamentally better constructed, stronger, or made from finer materials than a basic $69 a dozen ±.006" hunting shaft. In most cases, they're just a few thousandths of an inch from being the exact same product.

Straighter Arrows Shoot Straighter, Right?

From a pure physics standpoint, yes! Arrow straightness certainly does matter. Straighter arrows undeniably fly more accurately. In long-range laboratory conditions with a mechanical shooting machine, the straightest arrows with the best spine consistencies will always group best. But try to keep this issue in reasonable perspective. You are not a mechanical shooting machine. You don't shoot in laboratory conditions, and you probably don't shoot at extreme distances (100+ yards). The straightness difference in a ±.006" arrow and a ±.001" arrow is literally the width of a single human hair. So realistically, the ±.001" arrow probably has more to do with selling arrows than shooting arrows. The truth is, only a handful of the world's archers actually have enough shooting skill to differentiate between a very good ±.003" arrow and a "pro grade" ±.001" arrow. And within the typical bowhunting range, any difference would be practically imperceptible.

Nonetheless, bowhunters tend to attribute their successes or failures to their equipment rather than to their actual skills. So owning and shooting a set of professional grade ±.001" arrows may provide some bowhunters with an edge in confidence, even if the actual technical advantage is negligible. If you're one of the many archers who believe that success is only one more purchase away, buy whatever arrows you like. Just remember that super-straight arrows won't correct poor shooting form. In the end, the benefits of a good practice regimen and proper bow tuning will FAR outweigh the benefits of shooting expensive arrow shafts.

Are Carbon Arrows Straighter than Aluminum Arrows?

Yes and no. While a carbon arrow's advertised specs may be no straighter than a typical aluminum shaft, carbon arrows resist distorting and "bending out of shape" much better than aluminum arrows. Though an aluminum shaft may BEGIN with a similar ±.003" straightness, its straightness quickly deteriorates through normal use and handling. So after a few months of use, your aluminum arrow set may contain a few arrows that are at original specs and some that are grossly out of straightness. Carbon arrows generally do not retain this kind of "memory" after being stressed (bent). So your carbon arrow set stays much more straight and uniform - even with heavy use. Some archers even joke that there are only two states of a carbon arrow: straight or broken, but never bent. While that's not entirely accurate, it does help to illustrate the point."

Source for the above: http://www.huntersfriend.com/carbon_arrows/hunting_arrows_selection_guide_chapter_2.htm


field14 (Tom D.)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the help guys. I watched the video and read your comments and the article. I think I am going to pick up a dozen GT Ulralights (not the pro version) and cut them at both ends equally to my arrow length (28"). I could go a little shorter with my very comfortable 28" DL on my Insanity CPXL, but I am constantly considering increasing to a 28.5" DL, though I probably never will because I get plenty of speed with 28" and it affords me plenty of sleeve clearance when hunting with several layers of clothing in Northern Minnesota. Thanks again for the advice.
 

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22's! Tough straight light arrow. Love me some 22's


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Maxima Blue Streaks for me. But I am just a pro so what do I know. John Dudley didn`t have an agenda.. did he?
 

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I voted for the Ultralight over the 22 simple because it offers more spine range. The 22s are .300 only. I have shot both since I shoot a .300 spine. In that spine the weight difference is 8.5 grains per inch vs 73. grains per inch. Either/both have been good shooters for me and relatively durable for a light weight carbon arrow.
In GoldTips you also have the Velocity line. Same diameter, trueness options, and weight as the UltraLights but a slight difference in weight variation. One is +/- .5 grains and the other is +/- 2 grains. it is my experience that I can vary 2 grains just with fletching and insert glue.
 
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