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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What are people's thoughts on hand held range finders vs a sight such as the Burris Oracle? Do you still carry a hand held in your pack or with the sight do you leave it at the house? Just got a Burris and wonder what everyone thinks on this topic.
 

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I don't have any experience with range finding sights but I try to never leave home without a range finder. Just looking at the Burris I'd think you should be good to go? Does a pin or dot automatically make range adjustments?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I don't have any experience with range finding sights but I try to never leave home without a range finder. Just looking at the Burris I'd think you should be good to go? Does a pin or dot automatically make range adjustments?
Yes, the Oracle automatically adjusts the yardages to the target and moves the pin accordingly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I would hate a range finding sight. I also hate cars that unlock and lock the doors for me, etc.
I can definitely respect that, I am at least going to try this out though. Takes one more step out of the few seconds of opportunity to send an arrow down range, not to mention one less movement to be detected.
 

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Once you have checked your sight with your range finder and verified they range the same, you won't need it. The sight will do all. I have the Garmin A1i, and it is way more reliable and accurate than my handheld. But, it has to be set up perfectly to give the best read out. On the flip side, having a backup is always good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Once you have checked your sight with your range finder and verified they range the same, you won't need it. The sight will do all. I have the Garmin A1i, and it is way more reliable and accurate than my handheld. But, it has to be set up perfectly to give the best read out. On the flip side, having a backup is always good.
I am really looking forward to getting mine set up and finding out how I like it. What are your thoughts on the added weight, do you even realize it after you get used to it?
 

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My Garmin weighs about the same as my previous sight: HHA Kingpin Tournament Edition (about a pound). So, I don't notice anything different in relation to weight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
How does this do with tight shot windows in thick areas?
Good question, I would have to do some testing and get back to you on that. It likely wont work very well if it is ranging branches or leaves, but you could run into that with a hand held too I suppose.
 

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Good question, I would have to do some testing and get back to you on that. It likely wont work very well if it is ranging branches or leaves, but you could run into that with a hand held too I suppose.
But with a handheld would it be easier to notice it/disregard the bad data and then shoot the old fashioned way?
 

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I read in the specs that the Garmin has a 1meter window at 1 Kilometers. That is extremely tight, and when set up correctly will correctly range your target.
 

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But with a handheld would it be easier to notice it/disregard the bad data and then shoot the old fashioned way?
You can use the bow mounted sight like a handheld too. Just hold the bow up to your eye/nose and sight the target and press the button. Now, this is for the Garmin which I am familiar with. It gives you visual cues (arrows pointing) on the screen to show which direction to torque the grip to get it correctly aligned. Once you have a red dot within the green circle, you are locked on the target. Of course, this works after setting up the sight to your body and calibrating and testing for correctness. The good thing is that the sight can learn, the bad thing is it may not work for your buddy if he tries to just range with it.
 

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How does this do with tight shot windows in thick areas?
My buddy has the Garmin A1i and loves it but he has the same issues with small shot windows and brush as a regular range finder.

Personally I prefer the hand held so I can range everything around me from a tree stand for reference without much movement. Plus I don’t want to have to depend on something electronic that could stop working. I carry extra batteries for my handheld just in case. The garmin does have excellent battery life though.


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Just make sure you check state regulations. Here in Washington we cannot have any electronic devises attached to the bow, that even includes the little led lights that are on may sights for aux pin lighting. So we can't use the rangefinder sights.
 

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As a member and official Measurer for the Pope & Young Club, I myself will not buy one as it is against the club’s policy concerning electronic devices attached to your bow. And like Veritas mentioned above, make sure you check your states bowhunting regulations to make sure they are legal to hunt with.
 

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If you want one and have the money, by all means buy one and put it on your bow. However, like others have stated, check the regulations of the State you intent to hunt in to make sure they are legal to hunt with.

With that said... still have a handheld Rangefinder with you as a backup. because anything electronic can fail, and most often in most inopportune times. Always a good idea to have a backup.
 

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I leave my range finder at home since I started using the Burris. My sight yardage readings
corresponded with my hand held range finder, but it doesn't matter if they do or not.
I have to laugh at all of the people that worry about the electronic sight failing and having a back up.
Do they also fear your car electronics failing every time you drive ?.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
If you want one and have the money, by all means buy one and put it on your bow. However, like others have stated, check the regulations of the State you intent to hunt in to make sure they are legal to hunt with.

With that said... still have a handheld Rangefinder with you as a backup. because anything electronic can fail, and most often in most inopportune times. Always a good idea to have a backup.
I found one on AT at a great price, I wouldn't personally spend the money on a brand new one as I am fairly frugal. But at a 70% discount from new price I figured it was something I would give a try! I will probably still carry the handheld until I get super comfortable with the sight.
 
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