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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys-
Just got a new bow setup, finally on a 27 inch riser and got new limbs as well. I'm tall and lanky, and not very strong. I was shooting 24 pound limbs but with my longer draw length i was extending about 2 inches past, so approximately 26-28 pounds. I'm now on 30lb limbs on a 27 inch riser, so I'm probably pulling about 30-31, and I'm noticing the difference. I also haven't shot in 2 months due to school starting back up and being on vacation. What do you guys think is the best way to become more comfortable at the heavier draw weight? I wasn't straining or anything at 30 pounds, but it defo wasn't super comfortable. I know with practice and reps ill get used to it and probably shoot better than where i was before.

Thanks for any advice!
 

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There are some activities, forgot what they are "officially" called, but it involves coming to full draw and holding it for up to thirty seconds. Do these with your lower weight limbs and with your bow turned down to start; the stressors are quite different when you are holding for an extended time.

Then, the weight you jumped sort of sounds like a lot, not in sheer numbers but in the recurve world it's a pretty big jump, just make sure it isn't effecting your form and you are still getting to full expansion. My metric for an increase is to be able to shoot a full 1440 round [144 arrows] or two 720 rounds in a day, and have the last shot as comfortable to hold as the first... Then I might add a turn to my limb bolts, so the increase is hardly noticeable, and prevents my ego from outrunning my form. .
 

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There are some activities, forgot what they are "officially" called, but it involves coming to full draw and holding it for up to thirty seconds. Do these with your lower weight limbs and with your bow turned down to start; the stressors are quite different when you are holding for an extended time.

Then, the weight you jumped sort of sounds like a lot, not in sheer numbers but in the recurve world it's a pretty big jump, just make sure it isn't effecting your form and you are still getting to full expansion. My metric for an increase is to be able to shoot a full 1440 round [144 arrows] or two 720 rounds in a day, and have the last shot as comfortable to hold as the first... Then I might add a turn to my limb bolts, so the increase is hardly noticeable, and prevents my ego from outrunning my form. .
SPT. Specific Physical Training. Hold at the RECURVE full draw and anchor, for 30 seconds, BOTH sides.
So, if a RIGHT handed shooter, hold the bow at full draw and anchor, for 30 seconds, with the RIGHT hand (string hand). Then, hold the bow at full draw and anchor, for 30 seconds, with the LEFT hand (usual bow hand).

BUT, I have a RIGHT handed bow!!!! Yup, and you can still do the SPT for the other side of your body, even with a right handed bow. This builds strength, stamina and balance on both sides of the upper body.
 

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Then, the weight you jumped sort of sounds like a lot, not in sheer numbers but in the recurve world it's a pretty big jump, . .
Jumping from 24 lb limbs to 30 lb limbs is a SUPER bad idea.
BUT, the 24 lb limbs were with a 25-inch riser.

Now you have 30 lb limbs on a 27-inch riser, which is equivalent to 28 lb limbs on a 25-inch riser.

So, technically, for POUNDS on the fingers, you are jumping up 4 lbs on the fingers.
So, the 27-inch riser SHOULD have +5% weight adjustment range, and SHOULD have -5% weight adjustment range. So, the 30 lbs limbs, on a 27-inch riser, SHOULD be providing 28 lbs on the fingers at a 28-inch draw length.

BUT, with your PROBABLY 30-inch RECURVE draw length, you SHOULD have 32 lbs on the fingers, +5% down to -5 %. If we turn your limb bolts out of the riser to the SAFE limit, you can drop that 32 lbs on the fingers to -5%, which would put you at 30.5 lbs to 31 lbs on the fingers.

So, if you were at 30 lbs on the fingers, with the 25-inch riser, you are WITHIN the reasonable range
for increase on pounds on the fingers.

DO the SPT exercises, BOTH side of your body.
DO bent over rows, with a dumb bell.

My rule of thumb for BOOSTING pounds on the fingers.
You need to work up to 15 reps, with STRICT form, at 150% for the pounds on the fingers,
to develop adequate CONTROL for the new pounds on the fingers...meaning shooting 270 points out of 300 pts
on the 40 cm target face.

So, for 31 lbs on the fingers, you need to work up to 45 lb dumb bells, 15 reps, for EACH side...bent over rows.
IF you cannot train 15 reps, with STRICT form, for bent over dumb bell rows,
then, you should not be shooting 31 lbs on the fingers.
 

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If you have access to a gym,
then, SEATED rowing machine is easier than bent over dumb bell rows.

Same deal. To shoot 31 lbs on the fingers with SUFFICIENT control,
need to pull 150% of the weight per arm, on the seated rowing machine
so set the weight stack of plates for 90 lbs to 100 lbs on the seated rowing machine,
and do 15 STRICT reps. WHEN you can do 3 sets of 15 reps, in the seated rowing machine with 100 lbs on the weight stack...THEN, you are ready to shoot 30 lbs on the fingers, with CONTROL.

I used to train for my recurve with 42 lbs on the fingers. Yes, I have a 27-inch Bernardini Luxor.
So, yup, I was doing reps with 120 lbs on the weight stack. 15 reps x 3 sets. If you wanna boost the pounds on the fingers, gotta put in the time, pushing steel.
 

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Hey guys-
Just got a new bow setup, finally on a 27 inch riser and got new limbs as well. I'm tall and lanky, and not very strong. I was shooting 24 pound limbs but with my longer draw length i was extending about 2 inches past, so approximately 26-28 pounds. I'm now on 30lb limbs on a 27 inch riser, so I'm probably pulling about 30-31, and I'm noticing the difference. I also haven't shot in 2 months due to school starting back up and being on vacation. What do you guys think is the best way to become more comfortable at the heavier draw weight? I wasn't straining or anything at 30 pounds, but it defo wasn't super comfortable. I know with practice and reps ill get used to it and probably shoot better than where i was before.

Thanks for any advice!
FIND a recurve coach. If you are shooting barebow, FIND a barebow recurve coach. They are out there.
You boost the limb weight. You switched from a 25-inch riser to a 27-inch riser. Tall and lanky and NOT VERY STRONG. Hmmmm. Recipe for injury, if your draw motion is not biomechanically reasonable.

Yeah, there is a "RIGHT" way to pull back a bowstring, and there are many ways to pull back a bowstring and damage the shoulder (string side).

So, do not shoot the 30 lb limbs on the 27-inch riser,
until AFTER you can do strict reps, 15 reps with 45 lb dumb bells, bent over rows, for the right side (string side)
and for the left side (bow arm side).

When you can do 3 sets of 15 reps of bent over dumb bell rows, with 45 lb dumb bells,
NOW you are ready to train with the 30 lb limbs.

Not even close to do 10 reps of bent over rows, with 45 lb dumb bells?

Put the 24 lb limbs back on the 27-inch riser.
BUT, that's only 26 lbs on the fingers. That's sooooo LOW on the poundage. BUT, I bought new ARROWS to go with my new 27-inch riser.

Train with the 24 lb limbs and keep shooting the 24 lb LIMBS until you can shoot MORE than 270 points out of 300 on the 40 cm target at 18 meters. While trying to get to 270 points out of 300 points on the 40 cm target,
with the 24 lb limbs...

continue working on getting to 15 reps for 3 sets, of bent over dumb bell rows,
with 45 lb dumb bells.

Cannot lift a 45 lb dumb bell even ONE time, for a bent over row?
Then, try 30 lb dumb bells for 15 reps of bent over rows.
Cannot do even five reps for bent over rows with the 30 lb dumb bells?

Then, try 15 lb dumb bells for 15 reps of bent over rows. IT's a progression. Gotta build up the muscles
in the shoulder area (rotator cuff, trapezius, rhomboid, and others) and as you build STAMINA, the tendons also get stronger, resistant to tears.

I would NEVER let any of my barebow recurve students go from 24 lb limbs up to 30 lb limbs,
even if jumping from a 25 inch riser to a 27-inch riser. ESPECIALLY if you cannot pass the 150% bent over dumb bell test.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
There are some activities, forgot what they are "officially" called, but it involves coming to full draw and holding it for up to thirty seconds. Do these with your lower weight limbs and with your bow turned down to start; the stressors are quite different when you are holding for an extended time.

Then, the weight you jumped sort of sounds like a lot, not in sheer numbers but in the recurve world it's a pretty big jump, just make sure it isn't effecting your form and you are still getting to full expansion. My metric for an increase is to be able to shoot a full 1440 round [144 arrows] or two 720 rounds in a day, and have the last shot as comfortable to hold as the first... Then I might add a turn to my limb bolts, so the increase is hardly noticeable, and prevents my ego from outrunning my form. .
I didnt have much of a choice as to the weight I jumped. I've tuned down my limb bolts to approx 28.5 lbs, but because i was experiencing stacking on my old bow, there wasn't much I could do. The long limb inventory of my joad club and archery store wasnt amazing, but this is only 3.5 lbs more than I wanted. I think my form will get back to normal soon enough as i just shoot more, but ill check out those excercises
 

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Hey guys-
Just got a new bow setup, finally on a 27 inch riser and got new limbs as well. I'm tall and lanky, and not very strong. I was shooting 24 pound limbs but with my longer draw length i was extending about 2 inches past, so approximately 26-28 pounds. I'm now on 30lb limbs on a 27 inch riser, so I'm probably pulling about 30-31, and I'm noticing the difference. I also haven't shot in 2 months due to school starting back up and being on vacation. What do you guys think is the best way to become more comfortable at the heavier draw weight? I wasn't straining or anything at 30 pounds, but it defo wasn't super comfortable. I know with practice and reps ill get used to it and probably shoot better than where i was before.

Thanks for any advice!
just turn the limb bolts a quarter turn per week. doing so allows your body to slowly adapt to the new stress you are putting on it. turning the limb bolts too much too fast will only end up with you hurting, having poor form, or decreased arrow volume.

you could always check out programs like Archery Strong. they offer a $10/month program that will help with strength for archery
 

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I didnt have much of a choice as to the weight I jumped. I've tuned down my limb bolts to approx 28.5 lbs, but because i was experiencing stacking on my old bow, there wasn't much I could do. The long limb inventory of my joad club and archery store wasnt amazing, but this is only 3.5 lbs more than I wanted. I think my form will get back to normal soon enough as i just shoot more, but ill check out those excercises
Turn your limb bolts to the minimum pounds on the fingers, with the 27-inch riser.
Then, shoot that minimum poundage until you can hit a minimum of 270 points out of 300 on the 40 cm target face.

The pounds on the fingers is NOT about strength...the pounds on the fingers is about CONTROL and scores.
When you can hit 270 points or better, at the minimum pounds on the fingers, you have mastered that amount of pounds on the fingers.

Then, boost the pounds on the fingers 1 lb or a max of 2 lbs. Scores will drop again. Stay at the pounds on the fingers until you develop the control to score 270 points or more. When you can hit 270 points or more, now jump up to a total of 3.5 pounds more than before. Scores will drop again. Train until you get back to 270 points or higher.

The dumb bell bent over rowing will accelerate your increase in control, at each step for pounds on the fingers.
 

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just turn the limb bolts a quarter turn per week. doing so allows your body to slowly adapt to the new stress you are putting on it. turning the limb bolts too much too fast will only end up with you hurting, having poor form, or decreased arrow volume.

you could always check out programs like Archery Strong. they offer a $10/month program that will help with strength for archery
VERY few recurve shooters can maintain shooting a 270 score out of 300 on the 40 cm target face,
boosting the limb bolts 1/4 turn per week. Each recurve shooter will regain control at the higher pounds on the fingers at their own pace, of course. Depends on the skill level and the stamina / age of the shooter. Male vs female, middle school recurve shooter versus high school recurve shooter, versus collegiate recurve shooter, etc.
 

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I didnt have much of a choice as to the weight I jumped. I've tuned down my limb bolts to approx 28.5 lbs, but because i was experiencing stacking on my old bow, there wasn't much I could do. The long limb inventory of my joad club and archery store wasnt amazing, but this is only 3.5 lbs more than I wanted. I think my form will get back to normal soon enough as i just shoot more, but ill check out those excercises
If the 3.5 lb jump in pounds on the fingers is already the minimum jump in pounds on the fingers,
spend 4 weeks hitting the weights (dumb bells) to get up to 45 lb dumb bells, bent over rows, doing 15 reps per set, working up to 3 sets....to build up the muscle (you said you are tall, lanky and kinda weak) to protect your shoulders
and your scores will increase FASTER, after you spend the time with the dumb bells.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
If the 3.5 lb jump in pounds on the fingers is already the minimum jump in pounds on the fingers,
spend 4 weeks hitting the weights (dumb bells) to get up to 45 lb dumb bells, bent over rows, doing 15 reps per set, working up to 3 sets....to build up the muscle (you said you are tall, lanky and kinda weak) to protect your shoulders
and your scores will increase FASTER, after you spend the time with the dumb bells.
thank you so much! this seem super helpful and im already going to the gym later today, so ill be sure to hit those bend over rows. For the SPT's, do you reccomend doing it before or after my shooting?

thanks, Ian
 

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thank you so much! this seem super helpful and im already going to the gym later today, so ill be sure to hit those bend over rows. For the SPT's, do you reccomend doing it before or after my shooting?

thanks, Ian
The SPT is a simple exercise, you can do at any time. This will build your stamina slowly, and safely.
Take your heavier limbs (always use heavier limbs for SPT training) and just TRY to hold at a solid full draw and anchor, preferably standing in front of a door length mirror. Same deal. Try to hold at full draw and solid anchor for 30 seconds. First time will be easy enough. Around the 5th attempt at 30 seconds, maybe you start to FEEL the fatigue. IF you lose control, if you start shaking, let down...and switch to the other side.

Will take some time to get to 30 seconds of holding at full draw, with control, with no shaking, with no leaning backwards, with no collapsed bow shoulder...and not only 30 seconds, but 30 seconds of full draw and anchor, and 15 times in a row, and BOTH SIDES. We want equal development in the back muscles for BOTH sides, to maintain symmetry.

Must maintain reasonable symmetry in your upper and middle back muscles, to keep spinal alignment reasonable.

So, SPT work, and start with a dumb bell weight you can handle, for STRICT bent over row form...
you will more rapidly gain control of your heavy limbs, and your increase in scores will go faster.

I coach barebow recurve, and I put myself through this same process (used the seated rowing machine)
to get enough additional strength and control to also shoot heavy limbs on my competition recurve.
 

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thank you so much! this seem super helpful and im already going to the gym later today, so ill be sure to hit those bend over rows. For the SPT's, do you reccomend doing it before or after my shooting?

thanks, Ian
Also add some flexibility training. Use a stretch band, use a heavy rope or towel. Hand behind head.
Dangle rope or towel. Grab end of towel with other hand, grab end of rope with other hand. Pull up with hand behind head, to load the tricep muscle. Pull down with hand behind your back to stretch tricep muscle. Then, switch hands. GEntle pull for a gentle stretch.
 

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Hey guys-
Just got a new bow setup, finally on a 27 inch riser and got new limbs as well. I'm tall and lanky, and not very strong. I was shooting 24 pound limbs but with my longer draw length i was extending about 2 inches past, so approximately 26-28 pounds. I'm now on 30lb limbs on a 27 inch riser, so I'm probably pulling about 30-31, and I'm noticing the difference. I also haven't shot in 2 months due to school starting back up and being on vacation. What do you guys think is the best way to become more comfortable at the heavier draw weight? I wasn't straining or anything at 30 pounds, but it defo wasn't super comfortable. I know with practice and reps ill get used to it and probably shoot better than where i was before.

Thanks for any advice!
Weight training- Really

Do these exercises

Dumbbell Lateral Raises
Bent over Dumbbell raises- bent at the waist or sitting bent at the waist floor rear deltoids

Bent over dumbbell rows
Pull ups
Push ups wide, medium, narrow
Higher reps @ 12X(minimum) 3 sets @ three times a week
Then stretch after every work out. Flexibility is strength

Practice with your bow too
 
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