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Discussion Starter #1
I have an Olympic style recurve with a Dynaflight 16 strand string on it. I've been shooting Easton Tribute arrows. I got some Gold Tip Traditional XT arrows and the nocks are significantly larger, causing the arrow to fall off the string.

I called Lancaster Archery to see my options are. I was told the glue on Easton Tribute nocks are a tighter fit, and that a Dynaflight 18 strand string should work with the Gold Tip nocks. This would mean I have to switch strings when I want to shoot the smaller nocked Easton arrows. I was also told I could get an insert (reducer) for the Gold Tip arrows and buy new nocks that are smaller and would work with the 16 strand string. Then I could shoot all my arrows from the same string.

I know I could also reserve the current string, but I'm a noob and doubt I would get that right. I don't have a jig or anything. I'm on the fence here. Any suggestions? What are the pros/cons with going with the different choices above? Is the Dynaflight 18 strand string FOR SURE going to fit these Gold Tip arrow nocks? Is there a better string I should buy instead?

I don't think I can return the arrows because I had them cut to a specific length and the inserts for the tips are already glued in...
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Also, if it matters, I will eventually phase out the Easton arrows as I inevitably ruin them (LOL) and just buy more Gold Tip Traditional XT arrows as needed.
 

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Gilbert -

The pros/cons are time and cost.

I would:

1. Learn to reserve a string, serving jigs are cheap, and it will come in handy later on.
2. Figure out which arrow/nocks you want to use and get the right string/serving.

My Olympic bows range from 26# - 44#, and the same string/serving/nock recipe works for all of them.
BTW - I have Easton aluminum arrows in my quiver that are at least 15 years old, the better you get, the fewer you break.

Viper1 out.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Gilbert -

The pros/cons are time and cost.

I would:

1. Learn to reserve a string, serving jigs are cheap, and it will come in handy later on.
2. Figure out which arrow/nocks you want to use and get the right string/serving.

My Olympic bows range from 26# - 44#, and the same string/serving/nock recipe works for all of them.
BTW - I have Easton aluminum arrows in my quiver that are at least 15 years old, the better you get, the fewer you break.

Viper1 out.
I guess my problem is I haven't shot the new arrows, so I don't know what I'll like better. They are lighter, so they should shoot a bit flatter, which will help with not having to adjust my sight as much when shooting from different distances (I don't have a micro adjust knob for elevation, unfortunately). Other than that, I guess they will shoot about the same. Feathers are shield cut and a bit longer than the shorter and parabolic Eastons...*shrug*

I stumble into these mistakes somehow. I'm leaning towards just getting the thicker string that will work with the new arrows. The rep from Lancaster Archery said that most arrows will come with nocks the size of the Gold Tips. The Easton glue on nocks are a smaller size that aren't used as often. So any future arrow purchases are likely to put me in the same situation. I've gotten almost two years out of the Eastons and only messed two up (one bent and one had its nock destroyed when I hit it with another arrow). Maybe I could donate them or sell them cheap to someone? I don't know.
 

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Gilbert -

Maybe if you told us what you were shooting (full specs), we could make some suggestions.

Viper1 out.
 

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I've heated nocks in hot water and pinched them a little tighter. Some archers are concerned that they may become brittle, but I haven't broken any.

Alternately, there is a good Rick Barbee U-tube video for increasing the string diameter with plumber's teflon tape under the wound serving.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Gilbert -

Maybe if you told us what you were shooting (full specs), we could make some suggestions.

Viper1 out.
Sure.

25 inch Galaxy Tourch Riser
30lb Galaxy Bronze Star limbs (Long, if it matters)
Easton Tribute 1916 arrows, 100 gr tip

The Eastons are 10.0 gpi and kind of lob at the target, while I have some ultra cheap Fleetwoods that are 5.8 gpi that fly noticeably faster and flatter. Its easier to shoot the Fleetwoods from various distances because of how flat their trajectory is. I was trying to find some light arrows that would fly flatter like the Fleetwoods, but would be -ahem- higher quality. The new Gold Tips are 8.6 gpi I think. Not a huge improvement -- it wasn't as much as I wanted, but that is what I got when looking up the spine for my bow. So I figured I'd give it a try. I also liked the look of the shield cut feathers, lol.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I've heated nocks in hot water and pinched them a little tighter. Some archers are concerned that they may become brittle, but I haven't broken any.

Alternately, there is a good Rick Barbee U-tube video for increasing the string diameter with plumber's teflon tape under the wound serving.

The difference in diameter is really pretty significant. Not sure shaping the nocks in the way you would describe would be enough.
 

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There are a couple of solutions. The quick and dirty quick fix is to wrap some masking tape around the serving where the nock locators are. I have done this in a pinch. I have seen it done with club bows.

It works remarkably well and lasts longer than you would think. It gets you out shooting while you work on a long range solution, and is also good for a quick field repair. Long term you have to decide on your string and nock formula.

I agree with Viper on learning how to serve. It is the first maintenance task I learned since I used to have to have all my store bought strings re-served.

Now I make my own strings so I control the formula. There are some tricks to fine tuning the serving size for a good fit. The best is to be lucky and have the right strand count and serving size. If not, you can still make due by serving over some strands if you are close,

or buying larger diameter serving material if not. What I do when making a new string is the hand wrap some serving around my string and check the fit. Once I find the material that works the best, I put it in the jig and serve the string.
 

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I find the Gold Tip nocks too looses for my preferences. Easton super nocks fit quite a bit tighter. Easy and cheap fix.
Thanks Arrowchucker
 

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Discussion Starter #11
There are a couple of solutions. The quick and dirty quick fix is to wrap some masking tape around the serving where the nock locators are. I have done this in a pinch. I have seen it done with club bows.

It works remarkably well and lasts longer than you would think. It gets you out shooting while you work on a long range solution, and is also good for a quick field repair. Long term you have to decide on your string and nock formula.

I agree with Viper on learning how to serve. It is the first maintenance task I learned since I used to have to have all my store bought strings re-served.

Now I make my own strings so I control the formula. There are some tricks to fine tuning the serving size for a good fit. The best is to be lucky and have the right strand count and serving size. If not, you can still make due by serving over some strands if you are close,

or buying larger diameter serving material if not. What I do when making a new string is the hand wrap some serving around my string and check the fit. Once I find the material that works the best, I put it in the jig and serve the string.
I'm guessing you guys shoot a ton more than I do. I have this one bow and have had this same string for almost two years and the serving looks pretty good. I took a LONG break from archery because I got really discouraged and didn't want to put any more time/effort/money into it. When I first started, I could only shoot in the dark in my backyard at night and didn't have a sight on my bow. I obviously missed a lot! But even if I shot a lot more, I don't know if it would be cost effective for me to buy all the materials and a rig to make my own strings. I guess I'll look into it eventually, but for less than 20 bucks I could order a new string that will work for now.

I'm just trying to make sure I'm not about to order ANOTHER product to fix my nock issue and have an additional unintended consequence that I might regret, LOL. Like, is there a better string choice of string that will fit these Gold Tip arrow nocks better than a Dynaflight 18 strand? I'd feel real stupid if I bought the 18 strand and it didn't fit...
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I find the Gold Tip nocks too looses for my preferences. Easton super nocks fit quite a bit tighter. Easy and cheap fix.
Thanks Arrowchucker

Can I get those nocks to fit the Gold Tip arrows? They are a 500 spine, in case that matters...I guess I could Google the size, but first hand experience is appreciated. And what string are you shooting?
 

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Gilbert -

What does matter is your draw length.

If you can use a 29" arrow, the 1716s would be appropriate with NIBB type points.

If you need a 30" arrow, then go with 1816s, same string.

If you need longer arrows than that, then the 1916s (31") are correct, but will be over spined and over weight.

For a beginner, a boiler plate recipe is usually better, until things settle down.

A 14 strand D97 string with 0.020 serving (#4 Nylon) will match up with Easton small groove "G" nocks.

edit: 500 spine GTs??? Are you out of your mind :mg: ???

1716s are 880 spine, 1816s are 758 and 1916s are 623 - and you're looking at 500???

Sorry about all the edits.

Viper1 out.
 

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Gilbert -

What does matter is your draw length.

If you can use a 29" arrow, the 1716s would be appropriate with NIBB type points.
A 14 strand D97 string with 0.020 serving (#4 Nylon) will match up with Easton small groove "G" nocks.

If you need a 30" arrow, then go with 1816s, same string.

If you need longer arrows than that, then the 1916s (31") are correct, but will be over spined and over weight.

For a beginner, a boiler plate recipe is usually better, until things settle down.

edit: 500 spine GTs??? Are you out of your mind :mg: ???

Viper1 out.

Viper, it's been two years, so you may not recall, but I'm pretty sure I got the recommendation of the Easton Tribute 1916's from you.

I am 6'3" and have a long draw. I measured it a long time ago when we were PM-ing. I think it was like 29 inches, but maybe 30?? That was literally two years ago though. The Eastons are uncut, if that matters.

The Gold Tip spine chart shows I should be at a 500 spine for my draw weight and length, and I had the arrows cut to 30 inches (so I'd be right in the middle of the 500 spine with a 100 grn tip):
https://www.goldtip.com/Resources/Spine-Chart.aspx

Why am I out of my mind?? This is so confusing...I get a different answer with every person I talk to. I just want decent gear that shoots flat. Why is that so hard? Ugh. Exactly why I put my bow away for a year...freaking waste of money if I have to "try and see" what works with 15 different arrow & tip combos.
 

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Are the spine ratings for Gold Tip the exact same as those for Easton? It seems like they rate them differently. Am I reading the spine chart wrong? I assumed my draw was 29 inches when I had the arrows cut. Lancaster does NOT include the nock or the insert in their arrow length and the Gold Tip spine chart says that I SHOULD include the insert and the nock throat in the measurement. So I just did the best I could. If it matters, I did manage to get one GT arrow at full draw without it falling off the string and it is still longer than where it sits on the arrow rest by a decent margin. I didn't measure it, but it wasn't in danger of falling off. I'm at least sort of confident I got the arrow length right -- or at least that it isn't going to be so short it is dangerous....

ETA -- in case it matters, I "splurged" the 8 bucks it cost for 125 gr and 145 gr tips in case I needed them to tune the new arrows a bit. So I have those on hand in case they are needed.
 

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Gold Tips spine chart is useless for finger shooters. You could probably shoot full length Gold Tip Warrior 700's and be close enough with 100 grain points. I use them for 34 pounds at 29", and they are both cheap and durable. For years I heated nocks in boiling water and pinched them if the were too loose.... I now try to buy only arrows that I have had good luck with nock fit in the past. I have a bucket full of single arrows of different makes and spines to try.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Gold Tips spine chart is useless for finger shooters.
Awesome. I don't understand why, but OK. Guess I spent 90 bucks on 6 arrows for nothing? Is that about where everyone is at? So I shouldn't even try shooting them and ask Lancaster (who I had a phone call with and they implied these arrows would be fine too, mind you) to take them back and refund me? I tried to do my research ahead of time...
 

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Order a string from someone who can give you a properly sized center serving to fit your arrows. Or learn to reserve your own.
Serving diameters come from .007 to .032. You don't need new nocks or worse yet to modify the ones you have
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Order a string from someone who can give you a properly sized center serving to fit your arrows. Or learn to reserve your own.
Serving diameters come from .007 to .032. You don't need new nocks or worse yet to modify the ones you have
Well, yeah, I can just get a string that works with the new arrows, but now I'm being told the arrows are the wrong spine for my bow too. So should I really be ordering a new string to shoot the wrong arrows? See my problem?

OK, I think I'm just going to put some masking tape on the serving temporarily so I can at least try the arrows out. If they fly like crap, I guess I have my answer and I don't need a new string. If they fly fine, I guess I'll have to decide if I want to get a new string or not.
 

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You can shoot arrows that are too stiff. It will be more difficult for a beginner, but good execution will put the arrows on the center line. Too weak can be dangerous so you want to avoid that. You won't have that problem.

I would go ahead and use the masking tape and shoot the arrows. Focus on your execution rather than chasing the middle. The reward will be that as you get better, the arrows will start going where you hope.

Masking tape works. It might look a bit funky but the purpose is to make sure you are out there shooting and not waiting on the gear. I have also tied dental floss between the lock locators. I think masking tape wears better.

Take a bit of extra to the range with you just in case you need to replace it. This will all sort out as you are in the sport longer. It can be real confusing, and often frustrating in the beginning.

The more you shoot, the more you will start to understand what you need to get better. Even though we love to focus on the gear, the most important contributor to getting better is practice. You can do that with what you have.
 
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