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Discussion Starter #1
Well a little more than the origin. I have an old wooden case with a shamrock painted on the corner, otherwise there are no markings or names. The only information I have about it, was that it was purchased at an estate sale in southern California, and was previously owned by an actor in Hollywood.

Inside the case are 3 leather arm guards(2 are old Eastons), score sheets from the Elysian Archers of Los Angeles, an old newsletter titled "Elysian Archer" for August 1939, a wooden arrow stand, a few broken wood arrows, and a wooden arrow display/holder, and some other misc. archery items(resin, pencils, etc).

In the display part of the case sits 18 wood arrows. 11 of the arrows are both footed and tapered, with no branding on it. 5 arrows are footed Easton arrows. The remaining two have no branding and are not footed or tapered.

I have spoken with my local pro-shop owner and from what he can tell, says it's possible that they were owned by either Howard Hill or Errol Flynn(judging by the age of the arrows and the fact that they were owned by an old actor). While I have no way of telling who originally owned them, I'm hoping that someone here might be able to help me figure out the origin.

I'll have some pictures up shortly.

Thanks!
Logan
 

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Discussion Starter #2
If any higher resolution pictures are needed or closeups of anything in particular, PM me and I'll get you a picture of whatever you need.







 

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Those are "Footed" shafts. Ben Pearson was a huge manufacturer of footed shafts in that timeframe (late 30's).
 

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Just an uninformed opinion, but I'm thinking these are more likely '50s vintage. 2 reasons - plastic nocks on the arrows, and the armguard at top right looks like it has an elastic type strap which would have been something post-WW2.

You could contact Easton and see when they started using that particular logo.

Anything written on the pencils that might give a clue?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Stash said:
Just an uninformed opinion, but I'm thinking these are more likely '50s vintage. 2 reasons - plastic nocks on the arrows, and the armguard at top right looks like it has an elastic type strap which would have been something post-WW2.

You could contact Easton and see when they started using that particular logo.

Anything written on the pencils that might give a clue?
I'm waiting for an email back from Easton. I've spoken with a lady there and she is looking over the pictures. I've spoken with Doug Walker and he doesn't know about the unmarked arrows, but says that the Eastons look pre-WW2. I've also sent an email to G. Fred Asbell.
 
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