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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have recently decided to get into doing archery, i have always been fascinated with bows and the concept of archery but never took the time to try it. So now that i am to that point in which i want to try it, i do need help getting started. I have been researching everything i need to know and what length bow and strength id need to start with. I also went to an archery store yesterday to see if i could get my recurve draw length measured and he wouldn't do it. He said i didnt need one. So now im at a stand still I dont know what length of bow i need or weight. I tryed some of the bows around the shop, pulling the string back and seeing how i handled it and it was odd but kinda makes since i tryed a 62'' bow with 20# and it was pretty easy to pull until the last bit and then i tryed a 68'' i believe and it being 28# and it actually felt more natural to the draw than the other. I have been looking around online for a starter bow and have my eye on either a samick sage or a matrix Ragim. Both are clearly takedown recurve which i what i heard best to start out with. I looked at the order info for the sage and it requests me to designate a specific limb size and i have no idea what to put.

If anyone could help me along with this matter on how to maybe determine my draw length at home, if i even need to and what size bow i need, i would be greatly appreciative. :eek:
 

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http://www.archerytalk.com/vb/showthread.php?t=1588147

Good intro thread on getting started.

Regards to draw length, you can't determine that properly without a bow in hand that is easily pulled to a proper anchor with an "introductory level" of proper archery form. Formulas based upon height, etc. don't always translate to reality.

You can post your personal physical "dimensions" here and the folk on the forum can guesstimate a ballpark for bow length based upon that - but your actual draw length is the wild card.

Read up all you can on beginning draw weight ... and believe most of the advice you will receive. Pulling a bow in a shop is quite different from shooting 50 arrows with a proper, repeatably accurate archery technique. You must view the bow as an additional muscle and tendon connected to your body and be able to dominate its usage in coordination with your existing anatomy. This will allow for the fastest and most efficient learning curve to unfold.

Good luck.
 

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Honestly, I would call LAS or an online store of your choice and have them put your gear together. They will figure all these things out for you. :) We can go into a long tirade of what you need, why blabla but I think that's the best way to get equipment just starting out without making it too complicated or confusing.

After that, you want to find some instruction. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you. Idk why he wouldn't help me find my draw length at the store. He just said i didnt need to have a draw length for recurve and that i should only concern myself with draw length if i do composite but from what ive read and everyone has stated, it seems quite essential to know it. What dimensions are you speaking of? like wingspan and height? im 5'9 and i can go measure my wingspan if necessary.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I was planning on teaching myself actually, do you believe i would need someone to teach me or is it ok if i teach myself. The only person that does lessons is that store i mentioned and its a bit expensive per lesson, at least for my taste.
 

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One of the best books written on ground-up archery technique is "Shooting the Stickbow" by Anthony Camera (available at Lancaster Archery and 3Rivers Archery). If you're in isolation from an instructor, this book will get you well on your way in a systematic and efficient fashion. Also includes equipment usage, arrow and string building, bow tuning, etc.

A good first book in your archery library.

Many archery shops are compound-oriented and simply don't have the knowledge to properly outfit or explain a recurve or longbow for the customer. You obviously encountered this type of shop.

Online, as mentioned above, Lancaster Archery (and 3Rivers Archery) are major archery dealers well-versed in the stick and string. Their advice over the phone will be of more advantage to you than a shop that only speaks "compound".

5' 9" ... Easily a 62" bow or longer will do the trick. Unless you're hunting in a pinched situation, there's really no need to go shorter the first time out. The Sage gets good press here, and you can start with "x" weight limbs and then later move up to "y" weight limbs if you desire. (A 68" bow feels "cool" for a variety of reasons ... but draw weight is draw weight, and there's no getting around that.)

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
What size limbs make the bow its length, online while i was checking out order info for the samick sage the limbs were listed from 25'' all the way to 60'' and me not know the size of the riser i have no idea of which size limb to choose. Ill try calling LAS later and maybe they can help me further as you have suggested. Do you think anything larger than 62 would be ok too or would you best reccomend 62''. I just sorta fell in love with the 68'' at the shop cuz of the way it felt. but i had never previously drawn a bow before until yesterday so im not too well versed in what im looking for.
 

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I believe the Sage is a 62" bow only. The draw weight poundage is marked with the "#" sign. 25# is 25 pounds. 60# is 60 pounds.

The Sage is a one-length bow (other than if hot-rodding with other limbs).

The ILF rigs you'll read about have different length risers and usually three lengths of limbs to choose from (short, medium, long) to make for quite a variety of overall bow lengths from the sub-60" shorties to the 72" long fellows.

It goes deep real quick, eh?
 

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The "custom" area is simply to match the Sage riser with the poundage of limb that you need. If you want a 25# limb, that is where you would make the decision versus a 30# limb. The short-med-long limb does not apply on this particular bow.

Best ... best ... thing to do is call and talk to a human there if you have a question. Or, sort it all out via our forum and then make the call with more "mental ammo" to run with.

The Samick Polaris is similar to the Sage and a hair cheaper. I own a few ... fine starter bows. Greatree makes some similar models. Then you start running up the financial ladder as you move into different traditional or ILF takedowns ... or even the one-piece models.

Hit an online site like Lancaster and cruise every bow on it. The picture will become clearer the more you observe.
 

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Kioleesh- First, Welcome to archery talk. Second, I am a newbie like you, and also like you, when ordering a bow online I felt like a fish out of water. Unlike you, I was not smart enough to ask questions first, and just ordered what sounded right and hoped for the best. Thankfully, I ordered from an excellent shop, who called me before filling the order to make sure I understood what I was ordering. After talking to them, I ended up getting a lower weight bow, the correct arrows, and a ton of helpful information. Trust the guys on here when they say your best to call the shop. I ordered mine through TwigArchery.com and had an amazing experience buying the Samick Sage, so of course I will recommend them. However, Lancaster and 3rivers both have alot of excellent feedback. Any of the above shops will be more than happy to take your phone call to ensure you get the best gear possible. On the note of the Samick Sage and the Samick Polaris, I have owned and shot both, and both of them are excellent bows to start and learn on. The Polaris does come in a longer bow, and is less expensive so it might be a better option for you. I preferred the Sage myself, for purely aesthetic reasons. The Polaris has white limbs, the Sage has Black limbs, I personally didn't care for the white limbs so I stuck with the Sage. Hope this helps and ask any questions you need on here. This site is filled with really helpful people with tons of advice and viewpoints who are more than willing to help.
 

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I, like you, decided to try archery last year, and like you have no affordable help around so I self learned. I think it can be done, and you can have fun doing it. You probably will not win any competitions right away though.

I went the cheap used one piece recurve route and I shoot without sights, which may be why I am not that good. I am 5 ft 11. I have short arms. And in some sense, the bow store guy is right. Your draw length is what it is, there is very little that you can do about it, and it will change, or so I am told, over time. The compound guys can set the bow for draw length, recurves you just work with it.

But draw length does affect draw force. Bows are measured and marked at a specific length. I.e. 25# @ 28 inches. Most use 28 inches but I have seen some at 24 or 26. This is important if your draw length is say 27. If the bow was 25 @ 28, you would lose a couple of pounds at 27. If the bow was 25 @ 24, then you would pick up about 4 pounds and may very well have hit the maximum length for the bow.

Given your arm length, it is possible to guess a starting point for draw length, which will get you into the ball park for draw poundage.

Arrows are wildly complicated it seems, but I bought a half dozen carbon arrows suggested by the charts and they have been working fine. I still have 4 of them.

I initially bought a cheap 38# bow that was 58 inches long. I liked it but everything I read says longer is better. So I found a cheap 68 inch bow. I like it. It may, may, have helped me a little. Get what you like and can afford.

For learning to shoot, I bought a few books, that have contradictory advice, but do cover some basics and really say that deviations are ok. Like stance, there is closed and open and flavors of in between. Then I looked at some video of beginning archery on the Internet and some serious amateurs. You can see how they do it. It is a lot like golf. You have to do everything exactly the same every time, or else the arrow goes out into the field. Start close to the target.

Good luck
 

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Gotta love over confident shop keepers who don't know the first thing about non-compound archery... Good advice above, and I'd definitely recommend LAS too. Samick Polaris is decent too (you can put Sage or Journey limbs on there to use fast flight material).
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thank you everyone for your feedback it truly has helped alot. I believe im starting to comprehend about all this and am trying to soak up as much knowledge as i can. I talked to someone via chat at LAS but honestly he was sorta helpful but not that helpful i believe if i just called instead maybe they could explain things better. He said most recurves start at about 28'' draw in a sense and to go off that. he also reccomended 30-35'' limbs and i feel like i should go for 35'' i guess call it instinct ha which could indeed be wrong. i havent checked out the polaris but i will but like byte i sorta go after bows with aesthetic purposes as well. But who doesn't? =P soo if they are generally around 28 does that mena i go for 30'' arrows? he never did answer that question but he did usually take 5 minutes to respond.
''
 

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Oh on a side note, don't be a fool like me and order wood arrows to go with your new bow. Wood arrows felt better to me, and looked better so I spent $60 getting half a dozen really nice wood arrows that were spined for my bow. I have now been practicing with those arrows for 3 months, and have 2 left. Simple fact is, wood is not forgiving when your still learning. I finally broke down and ordered half a dozen aluminum arrows today. I'll reorder some nice wood ones when I'm good enough to never miss the target :). Remember that the lighter you go, the better off you are. I went with a 35#, but I wish I had gone with a 30# now. I spent my first month training my muscles to be able to dominate the bow. You want a bow that has a draw weight light enough that you can shoot 60-100 arrows a day without wrecking your arm or shoulder. As far as arrow lenght, that goes off your draw length. If you have a 28" draw length, you want 30" arrows to give you a couple inches leeway while you grow and develop. If your getting a 35# bow, I believe you'll want aluminum 1816"s. The Easton Blues, or Easton Jazz are the most affordable aluminum arrow I've found.
 

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If your getting a 35# bow, I believe you'll want aluminum 1816"s. The Easton Blues, or Easton Jazz are the most affordable aluminum arrow I've found. Also remember to get arrows that have feather fletching. Alot of people who shoot recurve shoot off the shelf, and for that plastic/rubber vanes are hard on your bow. They left a residue on mine that I had to scrape off. You could also get carbon arrows, but I'm not sure how the spine measurements work on those and carbon tends to be more expensive.
 

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One of the best books written on ground-up archery technique is "Shooting the Stickbow"...
Opinions on that vary greatly. Some folks think it's great, some boards won't even allow the mention of it for various reasons.

http://www.archerytalk.com/vb/showthread.php?t=2015775

Do some checking around--hopefully you have a club within a reasonable distance, with folks willing to help out a beginning archer. Talk to the folks at Lancaster. Don't be afraid to ask questions.
 
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