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Discussion Starter #1
I have heard some different ways to get rid of target panic. But I would like to know what other people have done to get rid of it.
 

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I've had target panic off and on since I switched from recurve to compound about 3 years ago. I have tried several remedies including the blank bale close up stuff. Switching to a back tension hinge release helps but after a while I was back to the punching again which is fairly easy to do on a BT release especialy if it set fine. What helped me more than anything else was using a pull through release like the loesch and carter evolution, but it is an expensive remedy. Now I find I have no panic whatsoever and I have much better control over the shot sequence. It's interesting to note that virtualy all recurve shooters that use a draw length clicker don't have target panic, most don't even know what it is, it's a subject that rarely comes up in recurve circles and conversations. Shooting with a release like the evolution mimics the recurve draw clicker style very closely and helps the TP go away.

If your version of TP is freezing below the gold try this experiment. Pull up on the gold as usual with the safety on or thumb well away from the trigger, now pull hard against the wall with an equal push pull motion, push the sight into the gold and you should see a marked difference in your sight picture. Now imagine doing this with a pull through release, while you are push pulling the release will fire without any input from you and bam straight to the gold.

Hope this helps, works for me.

Regards
 

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try a back tension release. But what exactly are you having problems with is it punching not being able to hold on your spot or what is it.
 

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What I had to do is...

I went from a scott goose to a chapy boss. The chappy boss has a trigger and i adjusted the trigger so it was very light and shot it like back tension, once you get the bow drawn, lightly place your thumb on the trigger...then once you get the pin on the spot...start pulling with your back muscles...if your trigger is adjusted properly as you start pulling with your back the bow will fire unexpectedly
 

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Stop-Bad Advice Alert!

Do NOT set your release light if you have target panic. It will take you on a quick trip to hell. If you are using a trigger release set the tension fairly hard. If you are using a hinge release, set it slow so that you have a good amount of rotation before it fires. The whole goal here is to disassociate the connection between seeing your sight on the X and firing the release. Your goal should be to see the X but not try to force your dot, pin, or circle on the X. Your focus should be on the back end and making a smooth, controlled release without jumping, jerking your bow arm, or freezing on the target. You can only do this by taking the emphasis away from aiming and make execution the prize.
Jbird
 

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Lou & Jode
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turkey man said:
I have heard some different ways to get rid of target panic. But I would like to know what other people have done to get rid of it.
A differant way for me was to incorporate pulling the strap(with a caliber strap release)as I pull the trigger,this keeps me focused on back tension.Some shoot the same way but close the entire hand with tension to fire the release,the tension aligns the shot towards the center and helps you follow though,this keeps you from freezing up on a spot and,or jerking the trigger,more like a fluid motion.
 

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Bowhemian
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Quick fixes which have worked for me include blank-baling, switching to a different type of release, shooting with a different bow, shooting at a different target face, shooting at a different distance -- such as 40 to 20 or out to 90. The change seems to short-circuit the sub-conscious program that sets up after doing the same thing over and over for a long time.

Usually the demon stays gone for a few weeks but it always comes back. Sometimes I can just think myself out of it. But when I can't I just do something different.
 

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Remember.. Archery is fun
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Jbird said:
Do NOT set your release light if you have target panic. It will take you on a quick trip to hell. Jbird
Oh so true Jbird... I had to prove to myself I could hold on target without releasing an arrow. I used a Zenith release with a full cam. This would not allow me to release an arrow. After aiming for three weeks I started blank bailing and finally back to the 5 spot. To this day I still use just aiming without releasing as part of my practice routine.

Good Luck,
Nick
 

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2 factors that cause TP.

1: week aim, if you have a week aim you will never conquer your TP. Most of the time you have to rebuild your form. Poor form leads to a week aim. You need to get a bow setup so you can hold. Quit shooting. Check your draw length, peep hieght, shoulders, stance towards the target. Nuts and Bolts has given the best advice I have seen here for form. Once the bow holds for you, start with nothing but aiming practice, lots of it.

2: you are uncomfortable, your mind wants to get you out of a uncomfortable situation. You will start punching harder and faster if you can't get yourself comfortable at full draw.

There is no fast cure.

I hope i got my message accross, your not ready to start blank bailing.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
When I come up on the target and I get just below it I freeze. It's like some one is holding my arm down and then I jerk thru it and punch the trigger. I've tried coming down on the target and that feels more uncomfortable
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Jbird said:
Do NOT set your release light if you have target panic. It will take you on a quick trip to hell. If you are using a trigger release set the tension fairly hard. If you are using a hinge release, set it slow so that you have a good amount of rotation before it fires. The whole goal here is to disassociate the connection between seeing your sight on the X and firing the release. Your goal should be to see the X but not try to force your dot, pin, or circle on the X. Your focus should be on the back end and making a smooth, controlled release without jumping, jerking your bow arm, or freezing on the target. You can only do this by taking the emphasis away from aiming and make execution the prize.
Jbird
You may have opened my eyes to something. When i first started shooting bad it was right after I changed releases and I set my trigger very lightly, and I think I've been afraid of it going off to soon. After I read your advice I adjusted my release so it would go off harder like you said, and I went and shot, and feel much more comfortable. I think this may be my key because I won't have to worry about my release going off at a lite touch
 

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turkey man said:
You may have opened my eyes to something. When i first started shooting bad it was right after I changed releases and I set my trigger very lightly, and I think I've been afraid of it going off to soon. After I read your advice I adjusted my release so it would go off harder like you said, and I went and shot, and feel much more comfortable. I think this may be my key because I won't have to worry about my release going off at a lite touch
I concur with Jbird. It looks like you see it as well. I have one of the popular trigger releases and I can't adjust it as heavy as I would like. You can pull a big trigger with your back muscles.

Guys using BT should not make the same mistake. Set it so you have to work a little for the shot.
 

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Turkey Man

Glad to hear it helped. By setting your release slower it does two things. It takes away the fear of a premature shot and it forces you to settle on the target and aim while you execute the shot. Everyone knows that you can set a hinge release light and just rip it when the sight passes the target. But that gets you right back to punching and letting your position on the X
dictate your shot. Let the sight do it's little float and slowly execute the shot and before you know it you will be confident that you can focus on the target as long as it takes to execute a good shot. When that happens, the sky's the limit. In the initial stages of this transition the release should be set slow enough that if you rip it the result is a non scoring arrow. You will be surprised how well you can punch the centers out with a hinge release set really slow.
Jbird
 

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I have it on and off, I have a Scott Little Goose and and used the sping post at first and hooked my finger around the spring and WOW I had no clue how bad I was jerking at the shot.....I decided to completely overhaul my form and my set up......I drop the lbs to 50 from 60 adjusted my peep and got rid of the wrist sling and used a finger sling to train me to keep my hand open, then I took off the trigger post off and just imagined it was there and had a heck of a time with that I jerked, grabbed the bow did all kinds of weird stuff even when there was no trigger to pull.....I takes alot practice and lots of practice.......

I have found that the Scott Little Goose with the spring trigger post to be the best training aid in punching the trigger IMO....
 

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Quit over aiming

the problem most people have with TP of some fashion is that they try to OVER control the sight and get the pin to hold perfectly in the center.
when they try to OVER control the sight, it moves even worse. which makes an even worse sight picture than before.

most are convinced that the pin must be in the center when the release goes off to have the arrow hit there. nothing could be further from the truth. if you just relax, allow the pin to float and really concentrate with your mind on the center of the X. your shot will go there.

now you must have your BT down pat for this to work. a heavy bow will slow the pin down. a larger pin will make it look like its moving slower. practicing BT at close range with eyes closed will allow you to feel what the release should feel like when it goes off.

but these are just part of the solution. you must then bridge the gap between eyes closed and eyes open with a target. by concentrating on the center and just holding your form the release should go off. shooting at 5 spots at 5 and 10 yards and then slowly moving them back 2 yards at a time will bridge the gap until you reach 20 yards.

there are so many versions of what to do its not funny. there are some non humans that can hold the pin almost still and on target and get there release to shoot with BT.

i found out last year that if i just concentrate on the center and hold my form until it goes off that i shoot very well.

they say practice makes perfect. thats not true, perfect practice makes perfect. so to get it right you must practice it the right way each time. each time you dont practice the right way it leads you down a path to doing it wrong again.

you should really try to get some personal instruction from someone local that really knows what they are doing. a 15 min session like that will make a huge differance in the long run..

Shoot Strong
Tony
 

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Well put Tony, forget the pin and focus on the X and practice proper form.

I shot a late 3-D last weekend and could not see my dot, so I just focused on the area where the 12 ring was and actually was the best round I've shot in a very long time..
 

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I went through all this myself about 4-5 years ago. It takes a lot of work to get back on track. I was having trouble staying in the shot, peeking, punching, all of it. I really had to work hard to aim, aim, aim. I used two methods to retrain myself.

1) I put up a 5-spot at about 7 yards. I would draw and aim at the first spot until I began to shake. Then let down. I would then draw at the next spot, aim & take the shot. I would continue this pattern until I had fired at all the spots. When I got where I could aim and execute a shot without punching, I moved back to 15 yards and repeated the process. I continued this until I could stay in and call my shots.

2) Along with the above, I would do about 25-50 shots in the dark at about 3-4 yards (so I knew I wouldn't miss my bale). I would draw an arrow making sure I was on the bale, relax & execute the shot. You don't have to worry about attempting to peek, you can't see the arrow in the dark. I did this off and on for a couple of weeks until I got the "feel" of an undisturbed shot.

I think you mentioned you were freezing below the target, then pulling up & through while punching your release. Try drawing at the top of the target and settling on the dot from above.

Just a couple of ideas. Be patient, it won't come easy. It's all mental. Just work on everything from the ground up to obtain good form. Then try executing the shot without thinking about anything happening behind the bowsight.
Good Luck.
 

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turkey man said:
When I come up on the target and I get just below it I freeze. It's like some one is holding my arm down and then I jerk thru it and punch the trigger. I've tried coming down on the target and that feels more uncomfortable
You could be leaning into your shot. Try shifting your weight slightly to your rear leg
 
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