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ok guys, I believe I've decided to dive into the "take care of your own bow" game. With a new bow and another one on the way for my son, (wife has one as well) I figured it would be better to do the work on the bows myself.. The nearest archery shop is over 30 minutes away and frankly, I would enjoy doing the work myself.. The problem is this...... I have NOTHING as far as bow necessities go. So, here's my question..
What would be a do it yourself starter kit?? Please let me know what I would need to COMPLETELY set up a bow. From installing peep sight to tuning it for hunting. Once I have these things, I will gradually add the "don't have to have but make life easier" tools
And remember, I said STARTER KIT. Im not what you would call a wealthy man.
I won't be pressing the bow except for minor things like installing peep, etc. so Im thinking the bow master is the way to go on that.
 

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If you’re going to be doing any tuning, you’re gonna find that you will be pressing bows a lot more than you think. The Bowmaster will get it done on most bows, it’s just very slow and a little unnerving. If you decide to go that route, make sure you get some kind of bow vise to use with it. It’s much easier and safer to use a Bowmaster with the bow held in a fixed horizontal position. And you will need the vise for other things anyway.

Otherwise, my recommendations for starter tools would be as follows: LCA EZ Green bow press, a bow vise, a draw board of some kind (either build your own or the Archery Dezign one that fits the LCA presses is a nice option), a good set of Allen keys, d-loop pliers (regular needle nose will work fine as long as you make sure they’re smooth with no burrs), a bow square, a small level, BCY 24 for d-loops and rest timing cords, serving thread (I like BCY 3D). There are lots of other tools that come in handy and some regular household tools you already have that you will find yourself using. I’m sure I left some things out that others will add, but those are the basics.
 

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Arrow saw you can build yourself for cheap
Last archery ez green press
Draw board
Bow vise
Few hand tools Allen heads, torx heads etc
Fletching jig
Glue for vanes and glue for inserts

That will get you set up pretty good
 

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Word of caution, it will get addictive and expensive, but well worth the start up cost. I’d recommend a Synumn press over the Bowmaster personally. Better yet, but once, cry once and just get an Easy Green as you will end up eventually needing to change a string or limbs, or lube a creaky limb pocket. My Synumn was adequate for most of those things, but far from ideal especially with multiple bows.

Other things include:
Various sizes of serving material
Serving jig
D loop material
Allen wrenches
Bic lighter
Exacto Craft knife
Needle nose pliers
String wax
Bow square
Measuring tape
Bow vise
Small level
Draw board


If you’re going to do your own arrows there are a lot of arrow saw builds on here using a Drexel tool, and the following items are useful as well:

Gorilla impact tough super glue
Fletching jig
Dull utility knife for scraping off damaged vanes
Replacement vanes
Scouring pad
Small nylon bristle gun bore brush
Denatured alcohol

Seems like a lot, but I’m trying to be thorough in thinking about what’s on my bench. You may have a number of these things already, and if you need to know what any of those things are for, just ask.

I made the things I could DIY myself, such as the saw and draw board, and the only things I’d change in what I did would be to get the easy green right away and try the bike stand for a vise.

Any more questions, ask away. Plenty of people who want to help on here. I’m sure others will add things I missed (I’ve been told I’m not perfect).
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Word of caution, it will get addictive and expensive, but well worth the start up cost. I’d recommend a Synumn press over the Bowmaster personally. Better yet, but once, cry once and just get an Easy Green as you will end up eventually needing to change a string or limbs, or lube a creaky limb pocket. My Synumn was adequate for most of those things, but far from ideal especially with multiple bows.

Other things include:
Various sizes of serving material
Serving jig
D loop material
Allen wrenches
Bic lighter
Exacto Craft knife
Needle nose pliers
String wax
Bow square
Measuring tape
Bow vise
Small level
Draw board


If you’re going to do your own arrows there are a lot of arrow saw builds on here using a Drexel tool, and the following items are useful as well:

Gorilla impact tough super glue
Fletching jig
Dull utility knife for scraping off damaged vanes
Replacement vanes
Scouring pad
Small nylon bristle gun bore brush
Denatured alcohol

Seems like a lot, but I’m trying to be thorough in thinking about what’s on my bench. You may have a number of these things already, and if you need to know what any of those things are for, just ask.

I made the things I could DIY myself, such as the saw and draw board, and the only things I’d change in what I did would be to get the easy green right away and try the bike stand for a vise.

Any more questions, ask away. Plenty of people who want to help on here. I’m sure others will add things I missed (I’ve been told I’m not perfect).

What are the different sizes of serving thread used for? I guess all I would need to serve would be the peep and arrow rest cord.. Is there a certain size I would need for that or is it preference?
 

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What are the different sizes of serving thread used for? I guess all I would need to serve would be the peep and arrow rest cord.. Is there a certain size I would need for that or is it preference?
Buy the cheapest serving you can find, to tie in a peep.
BCY 3D in 0.017 size will work just fine for tying in a peep.

Drop away arrow rest, most folks use d-loop cord. About $1 per foot.
 

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ok guys, I believe I've decided to dive into the "take care of your own bow" game. With a new bow and another one on the way for my son, (wife has one as well) I figured it would be better to do the work on the bows myself.. The nearest archery shop is over 30 minutes away and frankly, I would enjoy doing the work myself.. The problem is this...... I have NOTHING as far as bow necessities go. So, here's my question..
What would be a do it yourself starter kit?? Please let me know what I would need to COMPLETELY set up a bow. From installing peep sight to tuning it for hunting. Once I have these things, I will gradually add the "don't have to have but make life easier" tools
And remember, I said STARTER KIT. Im not what you would call a wealthy man.
I won't be pressing the bow except for minor things like installing peep, etc. so Im thinking the bow master is the way to go on that.
SUPER low budget bow vise. Block of 2x4. Drill a hole for a bolt. Run bolt through block of 2x4, and attach a washer and a nut
to the horizontal rail of the workbench. Then, use a clamp to clamp the bow limb to the block of wood.

 

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(aka lug nut)
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49,611 Posts
ok guys, I believe I've decided to dive into the "take care of your own bow" game. With a new bow and another one on the way for my son, (wife has one as well) I figured it would be better to do the work on the bows myself.. The nearest archery shop is over 30 minutes away and frankly, I would enjoy doing the work myself.. The problem is this...... I have NOTHING as far as bow necessities go. So, here's my question..
What would be a do it yourself starter kit?? Please let me know what I would need to COMPLETELY set up a bow. From installing peep sight to tuning it for hunting. Once I have these things, I will gradually add the "don't have to have but make life easier" tools
And remember, I said STARTER KIT. Im not what you would call a wealthy man.
I won't be pressing the bow except for minor things like installing peep, etc. so Im thinking the bow master is the way to go on that.


DIY draw board. Boat winch from Walmart. I mounted the boat winch on a piece of plywood.
Other end, 1/2- black gas pipe (the outside diameter is 3/4-inch). Floor plate for 1/2-inch gas pipe. 8-inch long pipe nipple.
Wrap the pipe nipple in electrical tape. Screw the pipe into the floor plate. The metal backbone is Unistrut electrical channel.
You can substitute a 2x6 wooden backbone.

Plywood box is handy, cuz now you have two levels. Upper level for the tools you are currently using.
Lower level you can store tools that are not in use.



The red rope is the Synunm portable bow press. Slower than a full size press, but you said you are on a budget.
 

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BCY 3D serving thread is nice to have. Can use to tie in your peep. You can use Peep Tying thread instead.
Serving tool is nice to have. To serve PROPERLY...meaning the string or cable under tension, you need the BCY Micro Stretcher
and the Unistrut electrical channel.

 

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When I first started (about 4-5 years ago) I had a BowMaster cable-type press, later I got a Synunm rope-type press. But to me, both were extremely difficult to work with.

So, I broke down and bought an LCA Ultimate EZ bow press. I got the Ultimate only because I also have crossbows (in fact, I used it to replace the string/cables on my Scorpyd crossbow a while ago - I didn't use an allen wrench to lock the cams). If I didn't have crossbows, I would have gone with the LCA EZ Green Press. Why just today I used my press on my Mathews Avail to give the string a twist to improve the position of my peep (it had rotated so much that I couldn't see through it anymore, even if I twisted the d-loop, it went back out of wack after the shot). Once a friend brought over his son's bow that had jumped the "tracks". I think the boy torqued the string when he was letting it down. Anyway, the fix was simple, but would have been impossible without my press. The Ultimate press also comes with a metal rod that goes up and over the bow so you can hook to the d-loop in case the bow gets away from you and would fall to the floor.

Later I bought an LCA draw board which easily attached their press. I use it to tune my bows so that the limb/cable stops hit simultaneously. But a draw board is pretty easy to make (like Alan, AKA nuts&bolts, showed you).

I also bought a Baker Ball Bow Vise, which is really nice. It will hold my bow level, or in whatever position I desire. I comes in handy when I'm installing a sight, rest, d-loop, peep, etc. I have the two OMP levels that you clamp to the string and to the arrow to be sure all is level in the vise.

I also have an T-bird Modular Arrow Saw. Which I use to shorten my arrows if they're too long for my liking.

I also have a MS Jumpper Fletching Jig for fletching straight and helix positioned feathers/vanes on my arrows. I don't make arrows, I only repair arrows with damaged feathers/vanes.

I also have a serving jig to reserve areas on my string. Once I was trying to remove one of those brass nocks from one of my longbow strings (because I like to tie in a "serving" nock) and the darn thing cut my serving, and luckily not the string. After removing the center serving, I reserved it without a problem

Paying to get setup, all at once, is going to be costly, but the way I did it, a little at a time, wasn't too bad. Right now I'm set and really enjoy working on my own bows. There's not much I won't tackle - I figure if the pro shop in Columbus can do it, so can I.

You'll be able to save some $$$ by going through the AT Classifieds.
 

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ok guys, I believe I've decided to dive into the "take care of your own bow" game. With a new bow and another one on the way for my son, (wife has one as well) I figured it would be better to do the work on the bows myself.. The nearest archery shop is over 30 minutes away and frankly, I would enjoy doing the work myself.. The problem is this...... I have NOTHING as far as bow necessities go. So, here's my question..
What would be a do it yourself starter kit?? Please let me know what I would need to COMPLETELY set up a bow. From installing peep sight to tuning it for hunting. Once I have these things, I will gradually add the "don't have to have but make life easier" tools
And remember, I said STARTER KIT. Im not what you would call a wealthy man.
I won't be pressing the bow except for minor things like installing peep, etc. so Im thinking the bow master is the way to go on that.
Setting the d-loop. So, you have your bow in a DIY bow vise, to hold the riser dead vertical.



Cheap $1 spring clamp above the arrow nock, to hold the arrow level, when the bow is at brace height.


This is a string level, in the masonry department of the hardware store. $2 maybe. I just balance it on top of the arrow,
to confirm that the d-loop height is where I want it. Notice, I have the bubble touching the line on the right, so the nock is a TINY TINY bit above level.
 

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DIY d loop pilers. Purchase the cheapest set of pliers you can find. Make a line with a hack saw, and then, use a round file to make a half moon shape. Do this on each jaw of the needlenose pliers. This will grab onto the d-loop material. PULL apart the handles, and the jaws will spread wide, and tighten your d-loop.
 

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Some kinda bow press.



This is the 92Safari. I am like you. Not a wealthy man. So, I built the $20 pipe clamp press. Then, I got the Bowmaster. Wrap the ferrules you are not using in electrical tape, cuz the unused ferrules can and will scratch something. Then, I bought the Ram Products "crow bar" style portable press. Then, I got the Synunm press. Then, I got an old version of the Time Machine linear press.



Finally, a full size linear press.

Then, I got the 92Safari Linear Bow press, custom xtra long model, to work on compound bows over 40-inches of ATA.



Now, the 92Safari press is ALL I use. I customized with a wooden adapter to hold the d-loop, so I cannot drop it.



 

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You will need an arrow saw, eventually, to cut your own arrow shafts, to build your own arrows. I went DIY. I started with the Dremel DIY arrow saw, but the shafts on the cutting wheels would snap on me. So, I went hole hawg, and modified a 9-inch angle grinder.



Super thin grinder/cutting wheel for cutting stainless steel. Wastes less carbon arrow shaft.







The front shaft support and the nock support, are three pieces of 2x2. I taped the three pieces together, and cut the tops at an angle all at the same time on the chop saw. So, the height for all three pieces is exactly the same. This way, the arrow support holds the arrow shaft dead horizontal/level.
 

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Regarding the serving sizes, I too use the cheap stuff for nock sets and peeps, and I have different sizes of the better stuff as needed to make sure my nocks fit properly. I work on a few different bow and arrow combos though, so nice you find the right size for you, should be the only one you need.
 
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