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Discussion Starter #1
I appreciate this site so much and have learned a ton simply from reading and observing.

Did some trading for a Bowtech Guardian and love it. Shoots very smooth and quiet. When I got it the draw weight was 57 lbs. I’ve worked it up to roughly 62 and am comfortable there. I’ve been practicing at 20, 30, and 40 yards working on consistency, especially of the first shot. I’m not there yet but getting closer.

I’ll mostly be hunting out of a Summit Viper stand in some very thick stuff or on the edge of a field.

What would you suggest I work on as far as practice to get ready for archery season this next year?

I’m new enough to this that I’m not sure what all information I should be providing for you to answer this question but I’ll try.

Current Specs
Current draw length is 29” but I do believe I need to find the CP3 cam to shorten it to 28”.

Draw weight is roughly 62 lbs and I’m comfortable there for now. Don’t mind to go heavier but don’t want to overwork my shoulder until it I’m used to it.

Apex 2-pin sight set at 20 and 40. I’m getting good with the holdover for 30 yards but have also thought about a 4-5 pin sight.

QAD Hunter Rest

VForce HV V1 arrows.

Came with 4 100 gr Rage Hypodermics which shoot good. Also considering the Magnus 4-blade hornet.

Thanks for any tips, suggestions or thoughts.
 

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1. Find a good bow shop and make sure the bow is tuned and fits you
2.practice not to get it right but until you can't get it wrong archery is a repetitive process with success coming being to report the process the same every time
3. I'm my opinion ditch the broadheads and find a good fixed blade head
 

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IMHO don't spend a lot now until you know you are going to keep after it...make sure your setup is good and tuned with the right arrows, etc. Get a good harness for the stand, and a backpack to hold your stuff...get a hanger for the bow and your backpack...I like the Sitka backpack I have as it has a strap to hang around the tree with the lid open so I can reach in and get what I want quietly...personally I like the NAP broad heads, both fixed and mechanicals...get some good camo that will keep you warm/regulated...pattern doesn't matter much (it sells hunters, not hides them!) but having a good layering system is key...I walk in on the coldest of days in my short or long sleeved t-shirt...cool off then get dressed and climb up...I never walk in wearing my jacket...and just manage your scent...that and movement is what gets you busted far more than camo pattern...also, I ALWAYS have an extra release in my backpack...and normally a light and a headlamp...because I always drop something...you have to have a release and a light...
 

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Former Wyoming Boy
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Make absolutely sure your draw length isn't too long... get some help and get it perfect.

Your draw weight is fine. You're smart to not over-bow yourself.

Make sure to practice from a treestand. It feels quite a bit different than from the ground. You want to keep your arms and shoulders in a T with your upper body... then bend at the waist to shoot downward. Otherwise, you'll be hitting high.

The less movement you have to do to make the shot, the better off you'll be. If you can stand for hours without fidgeting, that's great. If you can't, it's way better to get a sitting shot when the deer show up on your left... if you're a right-hander. Either way, practice standing and sitting shots from your stand this summer.

Whatever you have to do to get your bow tuned, (arrow shooting straight out of the bow,) make sure you do it.
It makes a world of difference in how well you'll do penetrating game... especially with a mechanical broadhead. My goal in tuning is always to get a fixed head to fly to the same place as a field tip... at all ranges.

Only you can decide which will work better for your set up... fixed or mechs. You may be right on the edge with your set up... depending on your arrow weight and fps. There are advantages to both. The mechs do better with some power behind them. Fixed can be finicky if you do something wrong.

When a deer is about to give you your shot, remember to breathe slowly and deeply. Actually think to yourself, "Breathe!" :) Try not to look directly at it... instead, concentrate on where the shot will happen and how far it'll be. This helps with buck fever. And, if it's a buck, once you determine that you want him... don't be looking at those antlers again until you walk up to him! ;)
Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the tips. I’ve got a Chronograph for reloading so I’ll have to pull that out and actually see what kind of speed I’m getting. My arrows with the Rage hypos weighs in at 401 grains. Still debating the broadhead choice but figure I’ve got some time on that choice.

I’ve been rifle hunting for 7 years now and actually blew it on a nice buck this year due to “buck fever”. It didn’t help much that my 10yr old daughter was with me and was shouting “shoot the buck Daddy, shoot the buck.”

My plan is to spend a bunch of time shooting form a tree come Feb/march and then again towards season. Behind the house is a perfect tree to practice from with the climber.

I do want to paper tune the bow here soon to make sure it’s good to go.

I do have a harness, just bought the X-1 from HSS and really like it. Never leave the ground without being attached to the tree.

Thanks again for the tips. Helps me to focus my time to make sure I’m as ready as I can be.
 

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Repetition. After I got comfortable with flinging some arrows I went to working on a sequence. Pulling an arrow out of the quiver, placing it properly, checking to make sure my target wasn't looking at me (lol), connecting my release, checking the target to see if its looking yet, carefully drawing, etc. Visualizing what a deer would be doing. Step by step. You want everything to be automatic. I also practiced in September with a deer target. Learn deer anatomy so you know your best angles because they can be different than gun angles. This becomes part of being automatic. The more automatic things are the less buck fever. For me because of this practice my pulse goes up but everything slows down for me. The weird thing is my arrow releases on its own, way more of a surprise than a normal surprise release.

If you're using a climber practice with it. If you have the chance climb a tree and practice shooting out of it. Your impact points may change unless you have excellent form. (I don't have excellent form but I know my impact changes about 1-1/2" high at 20 yds)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Some people are smacking their bottom limb on the summit viper so be careful of that too
Thanks. That could certainly be a big problem. I had thought that I would raise the seat up as far as possible for bow hunting but seated that would still be a big issue. Definitely got to get up in the climber and practice with the bow.
 
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