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help me out if you use a range finder

1222 Views 40 Replies 36 Participants Last post by  stans806
Ok do i need a rangefinder that is designed for hunting from a treestand? I hav never owned one but the guy at the store says that just a standard $200 one wont work that it will be "off" because it dosen,t take the angle in to account. That makes some sence but how much could it be off. what do you guys use and how we
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ll does it work?
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· Speed Thrills and Kills
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i dont really buy the whole angle thing...mine works jsut fine and its a cheaper one but works great...i use it jsut to range objects here and there around me and i remember what yardage it is to each object...i could see the ones like the Arc and so on if you were hunting some really steep angles or out west maybe but for me its not worth the extra cost
 

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Nikon Archers Choice

I just picked up the Nikon Archers Choice and haven't really had the chance to put it to the test. I know that many people have said the the angle doesn't make that much of a difference,.....but the way I figured it .... for the small amount of difference, I'd go for it. Hell, if I didn't spend in on that, I'd probablly blow the money on some other "Gotta have" Archery product.:set1_thinking:
 

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If you plan on hunting steep, mountainous terrain then make sure it has arc. IF you hunt relatively flat land with no real steep angles then any range finder will do the job.:teeth:
 

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For bowhunting ranges, you dont need angle compensation. If you were 20 feet up, measuring a target that is 20 yards from the base of the tree, you will be about 1 yard off (you'll measure 21 yards). If the target is 30 yards from the base of the tree, the actual distance would be 30.1 yards if measured from the tree stand. The further out you go, the less important the angle becomes.
 

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depends on the height. I've found that it's off anywhere from about 1/2 yard to no more than two I think. Thats usually hunting at about 18 feet and distances 10 yards to 40.

I have both the Leupold RXII and Nikon Archer's Choice. For a steep 50-60 yard shot uphill or downhill I might really need it.
 

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If you use it while yo practise then it wont matter. range targets from a stand then shoot them for what the RF tell you then you will know how much if any to adjust for. I have the cheapo from Nikon it fits in my shirt pocket and so far I like it (got it in the bargin cave for 125.00 @ cabelas in lehi)
 

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rip off

If you are in the mountains and you are shooting at a 50 degree angle then it will help a little. if you are shooting from a tree stand then you don't need it. and the further away the target the less you need it. if you are in a stand and you range an animal at 25 yards and the animal is only 20 yards from the base of your tree. (like the "celebrity" hunters in the ARC comercials) you would have to be 45 feet up in the tree. at 21 feet up a tree the differnce between actaul distance and ranged distance is only 1.1 yards at 20 yards, and the further away you get the less the difference. If you hunt in the mountains on side hills so steep you have trouble walking down then you should get one. otherwise don't waste the money, you get get a nice rangfinder for under $200. I mean, why do you think Waddell is up in a crane lift for his angle compinsated comercial. Rediculouse.
 

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The most difference my range finder with ARC has registered has been 2.5 yards. If you want to elimintate that with out buying the more expensive model just range to trees at the same height your stand is and take mental note of the distance.

The most common cause for shooting high from tree stands is not range estimation error but breakdown in form/change in anchor.

hd
 

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So what is the best bang for the buck? In your all's opinion what rangefinder is the most efficient and en-expensive?
I bought the Low end Nikon can't remeber the model number but its less the the 199.00 and it fits in your shirt pocket to it is easy to get to. I got mine at cabelas in the bargin cave for 125.00 I think my bro in laws paid 175 for theirs. between them and thier wives they have four of them and they have done really well for them tha last few years.(they could wear out a tank in a matter of day's)
 

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If you are hunting from a tree stand on pretty level ground you don't need it. The farther the shot the less the angle plays into effect. Its at the close range that you need the angle comp. I hunt anywhere from stands that are 12 feet all the way up to 25 feet and the most my range finder has ever comped for was 1 yard. With todays bows that is nothing. Just practice shooting out of a stand at the height you hunt at and see how it affects your shot.
I also have some land where I hunt in a big draw. The angle plays into effect if I am up 25 feet and shooting down hill. But even then I don't think you truly NEED it. BTW, I bought the bushnell scout 1000 with arc and it came with a realtree video and Binos for 300 bucks. I think that is a great deal for the quality of the optics you get. I did have the bushnell sport 450 before that, but returned it cuz I didn't like it at all. Just my opinions.
 

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For bowhunting ranges, you dont need angle compensation. If you were 20 feet up, measuring a target that is 20 yards from the base of the tree, you will be about 1 yard off (you'll measure 21 yards). If the target is 30 yards from the base of the tree, the actual distance would be 30.1 yards if measured from the tree stand. The further out you go, the less important the angle becomes.
I agree 100 %, when they first started marketing the ARC in magazines they would show a deer out at like 30 yards, and would show the distance from the hunter to the deer at like 42 yards, they didnt show the stand height. If you Trig. it out you would have to be like 30 feet in the air. I have never had any problem with a Bushnell 400 from 20 feet up.
 

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I have used both, and there really isn't much of a difference. I know that there is some difference when shooting at angles. I say buy one if you want to know yardage and then practice from shooting out of a tree stand. Then you will know what adjustments, if any, that you will need to make. No need to spend extra money on an finder with angle calculations.
 

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my 2cents:

* I have Leupold RXII, and am not overly impressed. Have been more impressed with the nikons or bushenells WHEN ranging 400-600 rifle shots

* I hunt everything with everything and love having a rangfinder and all-n-all havent experienced the need for the ARC. Even my outwest hunts with rifle-bow havent been steep enough shots to 'need' it.

* HA, now w/ that said, if you buy new, chances are it'll come with it so why they heck not? its not going to hurt you and maybe one day it will help you
 

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The angle compensation is not needed in the vast majority of hunting situations. If you hunt out west in the mountains, it might be useful. When such occasions occur, there are tricks to getting the real distance anyway.
 

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I agree 100 %, when they first started marketing the ARC in magazines they would show a deer out at like 30 yards, and would show the distance from the hunter to the deer at like 42 yards, they didnt show the stand height. If you Trig. it out you would have to be like 30 feet in the air. I have never had any problem with a Bushnell 400 from 20 feet up.

actually I think you would need to be almost 90' up in the tree in the above case.:confused: No thanks!!

anyway, I use the Nikon 440 and haven't needed an angle adjustment feature.
 
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