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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all-
I love shooting my hunting set up and I am thinking of moving toward some NFAA and FITA shoots next season. I want to invest in a target set up and i would like some advice on the accessories needed to BEGIN copetative target archery. I know that I could go out and get the top of the live everything and still be terrible, but as a poor pastor:D its not possible.
Here are my goals-
1. USED bow- no preference toward brand- I shoot a Hoyt Dynatec now, but i am open to any brand.
2. target sight- No idea where to begin- long bar, pins, scope, 3rd- axis?? Any help here is appreciated
3. release- I am open to the back tension release, but until i have the money and time, I am considering a cascade relax release or a thumb/pinky as some use.
4. arrows??? Totaly open to advice, I shoot Gold tips now, but I know the target arow straightness etc... needs to be better.

help me with suggestions for good entry level accessories that i can grow with and reinvest at a later time! I wish it could be the other way, but money is tight for us all these days!

Thanks in advance, I love shooting and would like to do more than bowhunting!

Thanx--PB
 

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Well since you shoot a Hoyt now I would try to find a used Ultra Tec or Pro Tec. XT2000 limbs are fine, but alot of people like the XT3000 limbs. I would also look at either a Martin Cougar or Scepter. As for a sight you could probably find a used Toxonics Naildriver or Sure Loc. Having a sight with 3rd axis adjustment is a must. I wouldn't start with more than a 3x or 4x lens. As for which brand it doesn't really matter there are alot of good ones out there just don't go to strong you are just starting.
As for releases you can find a good back tension release on the clasifieds for about $30-$40. Don't worry about getting the perfect release on the first try you are going to buy another one, and then another, and another. Because you will be like everyone else and think the perfect release is out there. I would go with ACC's for arrows for outdoors. But I don't know what your skill level is. So you might want to get some less expensive carbons to learn on. Check Ebay you can always find bare shaft (carbon and aluminum) on there cheap. A Pro Tuner rest and a Beiter Stabilizer. That should get you started. I know you are going to get alot of advise on equipment but there is no need to rush out and buy a bunch of new stuff. Between the classifieds and Ebay you should beable to get started in the target world quickly and right with our help. Just remeber someone always wants what you have so if you buy something and you don't like it you can resale it and try something else. Also try and find a good shooter in your area to help you out. When you start with that back tension release start close to the target. I would actually make the release my first purchase you can shoot your current bow with it. Welcome to the world of target archery.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Hornet- I am planning on a 50 lb or so bow, and I have a 29" draw. Will there be a problem withthe stiffness of a smaller target arrow with that long of a draw?

As for releases, I posted a thread here asking about non-back tension releases already, but other thatn the cascade, are there some thumb style releases that are popular?

What should I look at as far as a stabilizer?

Oh...1 more thing, what kind of arrow tips?

more questions to come!
 

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Don't get the Cascade, you'll just end up reverse-punching. Find one of the Carter lineup and get heavy, heavy springs in it.

Arrows - the best you can afford. Navigators, Triples, ACE, X10... Take your pick. Good heavy point - 100 grain minimum.

Stab - Beiter. Always.

JMHO
 

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Out of curiosity, why not try Olympic-style recurve? :)

I love my training wheels (UltraTec XT3000), but my recuve bow (AeroTec) is just so much more... how shall I put it... demanding? Amusing? Punishing? Rewarding?

I have identical stabilizers for both of my bows, the 37" Beiters (plus the 3" extension, V-rods, etc.), and they are, as Shirt argues, the best. There is only one problem with Beiter: Cost.

kgk
 

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PastorBrian said:
help me with suggestions for good entry level accessories that i can grow with and reinvest at a later time! I wish it could be the other way, but money is tight for us all these days!
Oh, and the best value of all is probably books!

http://www.lancasterarchery.com/product-aids.html

The best book on recurve is "The Simple Art of Winning."

Bernie's "Idiot Proof Archery" is the second-best book on compound bow archery.

The best book on compounds is "Mastering the Compound Bow," but those naugty Austrailians don't have it published yet---see http://www.archery-forum.com/afstore/ (some day...).

And you can even get used books (from Amazon, for example) for a better value per dollar!

Finally, I suspect that lessons are the best way to advance rapidly... because there is no money in archery, and everybody loves a man of the cloth, I suspect that you could get a good coach for far less money than you expect!

kgk
 

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Classifiads for good buys

Custom Bow Equipment sights or Sureloc.

Doinker or Easton stabilizer 24-30"

Exteme, Bullseye, Shewrd Scopes

Mathews, Hoyt or Martin Bow 50-60lb

Carter release Insatiable, Carter 3d 2000 both good starter release

Trophy Taker Rest, or Pro Tuner

I garantee if you watch the classifiads and ebay this time of year you can find some good buys. Be glad to help you find a bargain or two, just let me know. Good Luck.
 

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Oh man I feel for ya.Its a very addicting sport.
I,ve been a bowhunter all my life,but was in you're shoes just 2 years ago when I decided to by my first new target rig.
Yep,Sceptor II.
Just my advice..............top 3 priorities..........
1)50 lb. target bow
2)coaching
3)back tension,back tension,back tension.
Hope to see you on the line,
Jerry
 

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PastorBrian

You won't have problem getting a good arrow match. Alot of people shoot 50 lbs. I forgot to mention to get the Archers Advantage Program or The Archery Program. It is agreat tool for everyone. It will give you a perfect arrow/bow match plus it will make sight tapes for you. I would suggest though that you only use your printed marks to check your shoot in marks at first. It will allow you to get more practice and work on your form instead of taking the easy way out. Instead of getting a couple of marks and punching the numbers into the computer for your marks. It will make you a better archer. Do a search in your area and find out when the indoor leagues start. In my area some start around Thanksgiving, but most don't start until after Christmas. However my clubs start in the begining of Oct. I can't wait. The indoor leagues will give you plenty of practice to get your feet wet in competition. Plus it is a good way to meet people to shoot with and you can also find someone to help you out (I would fly out to help you but....). Anyway good luck and let us know when you need more help, and keep us informed with your progress.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
You guys are amazing!

Thanks for the responses and advice. I am looking forward to this very much.

More questions:
How much might I expect to pay for some coaching?

Are drop away rests the way to go for target or a small launcher style--opinions welcomed!

Recurve sounds fun, I might want to go there eventually, but my next step is compound target!
:p
because there is no money in archery, and everybody loves a man of the cloth, I suspect that you could get a good coach for far less money than you expect!
I hope this is true!! God has blessed my wife and I many times over with unexpected gifts and surprises, but i am willing to pay for quality coaching!

If someone could help explain sight marks I would appreciate it!

PB
 

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PB,
If you can find a local club that holds sanctioned NFAA,and/orNAA
indoor tournaments,it shouldn't be too difficult to find a pro that will be willing to help with basic form & aiming tips.
I've always found pro's to be eager to help if a guy really wants to know.The advice is usually free unless you are specific about actual sessions and still you never know.
They can also tell you about any upcoming seminars held by some of the worlds best coaches.(George Chapman,Dave Cousins,ect.)These are usually in the neighborhood of 200.00.
The search mode on this site has huge amounts of advice also just for the looking up.
It sounds like your eager to get going,I hope you the best.
As far as a good rest,you basically get what you pay for.I prefer the Quick tune 3000 and the pro-tuners myself,but there are others too.Strength and simplicity are best choices I think.You can change the launchers on any quality rest if need be.
Some good tips here posted.......................good luck,
Jerry
 

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Drop aways are nice but there are some out that aren't worth the time. The only one I like is the Trophy Taker. But I feel as do alot of others that the Brite Site Pro Tuner is the best target rest available.
 

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PastorBrian,
As a teenager I was always looking to shoot my best with the lowest outlay of money, here are a couple of things that helped accomplish that goal. By the way I shot 60x's indoors before my 18th birthday.
3rd axis, while very helpful, you can shoot great scores without it. Shimming the sight block on the bow will accomplish the same thing. This is how 3rd axis was adjusted long ago. Its not easy but can be done. Buying a sight without 3rd axis can save you $30-$50.
Arrow rests, micro adjustment is nice, but not required. A Pace-Setter from Golden Key cost me $9 and that is what I shot my first 60x game with. Still have a ton of these rests that I use on most of my bows.
Stabilizers, try a bunch before you buy. Most archers are willing to let you try a couple shots with theirs on the practice range. I know I've done that for folks who were curious as to how a long stabilizer felt on their bow. You may be surprised as to what you like. Don't knock one until you try it. In fact until a few years ago, Terry Ragsdale still had an all aluminum stabilizer on his bow; still might for all I know.
Coaching, whatever you do, don't scrimp there. Find a local club and ask around. Don't automatically go with the first person to offer coaching. Ask experienced archers, particularly the ones shooting high scores (they're doing something right), pm some of the pros on here for their opinions. A good coach can set you on the course to high scores, while a lesser coach may not. A good coach should address not only your form, but what goes on between the ears. I noticed you're in Washington, not sure how far you are from Walla-Walla, but there are definitely some top shooters there. If you're willing to travel, Dee Wilde in Pocatello is the grand master.

Good Luck with all your target endeavours.
 
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