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Hello.

I am new to archery and have recently acquired several different Easton arrows in the following sizes:

2117
2216
2018

I saw bullet points on a site, but I am not sure which size is for which arrow and how exactly to install them. Do they have to be glued?

The point sizes seem to be designated in fractions like 9/32, 5/16 and so on.

My theory on this, is it is best to buy threaded inserts. With them I can either use screw - in bullet points, or together with screw-in broadhead adapters - use broadheads.

My confusion came from this site:

http://bbrothersc.zoovy.com/category/arrowpoints/

It says inserts feature "8/32 standard threads accept all standard screw in points and broadheads", but when you look at the screw-in points, there is no such size available. What am I missing?

Thanks,

Eugene.
 

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lorus,
First of all, welcome to Archery Talk. Lots of great people here.

The 8/32 you are asking about is the thread size of the screw in points. This is the standard size for almost all threaded points, save for a few of the very small diameter target arrows.

The other numbers, 9/32, 5/16, etc... refer to the diameter of the actual point itself. You want to choose the size that best matches the size of arrow shaft that you are using.

9/32 point = a 18XX series shaft
5/16 point = a 20XX series shaft
11/32 point = a 22XX series shaft

For shaft sizes between, such as a 2117, you just have to pick a bit larger, or a bit smaller point. Usually shaft sizes larger than 22XX have the threaded inserts tapered to match the 11/32 points.

The glue in points, are made for each size shaft, and are used for target only applications. If you are planning on hunting with these same arrows, I would go with the threaded inserts and screw in points for sure.

Hope that helps clear things up for you.
Rhino :)
 

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One more thing...

Don't try and shoot all of those different size arrows together. Pick one that shoots the best out of your bow, and stick with it. Each one has a different "spine" or stiffness, and each will weigh different, which will result in different flight and impact, or accuracy.

Have fun!
Rhino
 
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