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Discussion Starter #1
I'm learning how to shoot a hinge(finally). I can draw and shoot with it, and get fair accuracy, but I'm having a problem with vertical stringing of my shots. When I draw and come to anchor, I put my scope in alignment with my peep, but as I pull through the shot and the release rotates in my hand, my peep moves up so that my view of the target is partially blocked by the bottom of the peep hole.

My friend suggested that I am over-rotating the release at first, so the angle changes more, and that I should draw with it just slightly toward my index finger, release the safety, and rotate into it and then pull through. I haven't tried that yet, as he told me late last night. At first I thought it was me moving my head, but at league last night I got the shop owner to watch me shoot and my head wasn't moving. Then I rocked the release back and forth and I could see the peep move. Then I would set up with my circle(on my scope) at the top of the hole in my peep, and as I rotated through, it would move to the center. That may be the answer, but I was wondering if anyone else has an alternate solution. I can always find the weird problem that no one else has.

Thanks,
 

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I'm not sure I have an exact answer but I will contribute a couple thoughts.

I am going to assume you are a RH shooter,

1. If when you are "rotating" the release you are keeping a firm index finger then yes you will move the head of the release to the right and probably slightly up. The key to shooting a hinge release is relaxing. You need to relax everything from your elbow to your fingers, except for what is needed to actually hold on to the release. The back of your had should be completely flat.
By doing this when you "rotate" the release you will not be rotating on the axis of a locked index finger, but rather on an imaginary axis between your index and middle finger which is a lot closer to directly behind the head of the release thus eliminating the left/right change

2. As you are learning BT it is common to see people either collapse their front arm "pull" the shot to the right. One sign you are doing this is the string will come to the side of your nose rather than touching the tip (if that is how you anchor) The other possibility is that you may do the opposite and put too much push into your bow arm and thus "push" the shot to the left. The best thing I can tell you here is that you need good solid upper body form. Keep your left shoulder in line. Stand tall and push your chest out. This will keep you from letting your shoulders curl in. Then you don't want to "drive the bow forward" but rather just match any pull backward with a steady pressure forward, directly toward the X.

Hope this helps, I'm sure others will give more help too,

Mitch
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Mitch!

That sounds like it will help. I'm having enough "good moments" that I'm encouraged that this is the best way to move up to the next level. Just gotta do the work and solve the problems. I just found a couple of articles on back tension by John Dudley, and I am reading them.

Thanks again,
 

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Another possible help is to consider using true BT technique which eliminates rotation with the hand/wrist. Rotate the release simply by totally relaxing the release fingrs/wrists/forearm/upper arm/shoulder and use the shoulder blade musculature to execute the release. Slightly change the tension on the release to the outer finger upon anchoring and releasing the safety. Then use your back muscle to "pull" that outer finger rather than trying to rotate the release. Search for more technical data on Back Tension and how to execute it properly. This should help to reduce the tendency of the sight pin to dive as you rotate the release.
 
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