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Discussion Starter #1
I think that I have only shot medium grip bows. I have shot a Super Kodiak, a Kodiak Magnum, a Grizzly, a Hoyt Dorado and a A&H ACS Longbow. I know that my A&H has a medium grip and I am pretty sure the others are too so I can't judge the other grip positions. I am exchanging my A&H riser for a different wood material and they have to make it because it's not in stock. I am thinking about getting it made in a high grip (if possible) just to see if it helps my shooting at all. I am under the impression that they could modify the high grip if I don't like it but I will need to make sure if this is true. So, What grip position do you like and why?
 

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FITA & 3D, Hunting grips

I'm fortunate to be able [even at my "advanced age"] to turn my hand to a straight "high wrist" style while locking my elbow. I've always shot target that way. Bought a Losch custom grip for the PSE X-Factor and love it. My BW hunting and 3D shooting bows are all "medium" grips. I can still shoot them with a high wrist grip style. [IMHO], a high wrist grip is much more consistant than any style that requires an angled wrist.
 

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There are some that claim that a high wrist grip can potentially put more strain on the wrist and apparently, medium is closest to the norm...
 

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Hey, AKM, just in case you didn't know, you can post this kind of thread with a poll, so everybody can vote and give their input as well.

I shoot a high wrist and recently purchased a Jager Grip. It is by far the best grip I've ever shot!
 

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I use a low grip on my longbows and even have an ILF riser designed to shoot with a low wrist grip. I find it more stable for me.
 

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Dished- which I guess counts as a low. It's just the easiest handle to build and not make it too thin- my handles are only 3/4" wide anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
There are some that claim that a high wrist grip can potentially put more strain on the wrist
I read this in Viper1's book. Shooting a heavy bow or a bow not designed for a high wrist can make extended shooting sessions uncomfortable.
 

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** I really can not disagree with you, HH Jr., but I've never shot and trad style bow that did not shoot fine with a high wrist grip.
When you shoot high wrist, sometimes the tiller is such that the elevated point of support as opposed to low wrist will make the bow more sensitive.
My Bear shoots great high wrist as does the Martin. The Golden Eagle will
act like it is overspined at high wrist and at low wrist it shoot dead on perfect.( the handle is set up for low wrist) I and other that shoot the bow over the years have had the same comment about it. I am only talking about a 1 or 1.5"difference at 20 yds.
It can be tuned out but it remains more sensitive than at low wrist, so I shoot it low wrist and the rest of the bows high wrist.
High wrist has the advantage of pulling about 1" longer draw and when we were shooting field archery with recurves that would often be a big difference in getting to 80 yds.
And high wrist is more accurate because there is less torque put on the bow by the shooter and is eaiser to keep it from moving at and immediately after release.
 

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Gents -

Some good points and as usual some interesting ones:

First, high, medium and low grips have been used quite successfully over the years, so to say one is better than another, may only be true for a given person AND at a given stage in their shooting career. (I've gone from high to low to medium and back several times over the years and currently doing quite well with the low grip.)

The high grips main plus is the potential for, but not the elimination of torque. Some people are quite ingenious and will torque a bow regardless of what kind of grip they use. The advantage of increased bone support is more theoretical than factual. It's biggest short coming is that unless (bow) grip is specifically designed for that hand position is it the most difficult to maintain over long shooting sessions. It is also the least stable (smallest pivot area). Yes, it can become painful, especially with some of the extreme variants.

The low grip is the most solid and therefore the most comfortable. Think about having to push a refrigerator with sticky casters. It does require a little more thought to reproduce consistantly and MAY increase the torque potential, if not done correctly. Once established, it's pretty hard to beat for consistency especially over extended shooting sessions. Torque becomes non-existent when a low grip is used with an open bow hand and sling.

Using the same bow, the difference in draw length should be minimal, with the only possible exception being a straight grip longbow, which IMHO, would be brutal to shoot with a high wrist.

Basically, pick your poison and develop it until you perfect it or need to try something else.

Note: really need to be clear if you're taking about BOW GRIP design and/or wrist position. You can and some folks DO use a low wrist on a high grip and quite well, I might add ... might even be the bst of both worlds - for some ...

Viper1 out.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Note: really need to be clear if you're taking about BOW GRIP design and/or wrist position.

Viper1 out.
I am going to ask if they can make a hi wrist. I think that I am trying to use a high wrist with a medium grip. If I am, my thinking is why not get a grip specifically made for my style of shooting.

Medium wrist ACS



Low wrist ACS.

 

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always been wondering this, how do you tell? Is it in reference to the riser?
 

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John -

IF you are comfortable with a high WRIST, then IMHO, a high GRIP is the way to go. Just removes a variable.

Viper1 out.
 

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With the wide variety of grip configurations on hunting recurve risers, in addition to draw-weight and the type of shelf, often dictates the best grip type to use for a particular bow.
 
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