Archery Talk Forum banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I switched to a Stan hinge from a thumb trigger and it takes forever to go off. I have it set almost as lite as it will go and it's still slow. For me to pull it back safely I have the post and index finger as the main tension when drawing back. My ring finger is pointing forward. This is the only way I can draw the bow and not have an unexpected shot. Once at anchor, my index finger has all the tension and most shots I can barely get it to go off so I just punch the shot before I get too shaky. I think my problem is having all the tension on my index finger but I don't see a way to change that.

Any ideas?

Thanks
P.S. I'm not a newbie.
 

·
Strictly Public Land
Joined
·
12,305 Posts
You shooting with or without a click?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,457 Posts
Start close, like 10 yards. Or even blank bale no target, until you are comfortable firing the release.
It will feel faster as you get more relaxed.
Check out Padgett's articles

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk
 

·
Strictly Public Land
Joined
·
12,305 Posts
No Click. I tried the click and it gives me TP.
Your shooting it incorrectly then with the click. The click can be used to set up the shot. Draw, as you anchor add tension with your ring finger and pinky if you have a 4 finger til the click once you hit the click you begin your aiming. That will give you a solid starting point for ever shot your travel will be the exact same every time til the shot releases.

What is sounds like your problem is, you are not transferring tension to your middle fingers. Once you anchor you need to begin try ferias the weight and tension to your other fingers. You can do this in multiple ways. You can allow the string to stretch your hand and relaxing the tension on your pointer or You can add tension with the fingers on the end of the release. There's a lot of resources here and on YouTube how to shoot your back tension.
 

·
Strictly Public Land
Joined
·
12,305 Posts

Fast forward to 6:43 to start their demonstration. This is one of the best videos for this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,858 Posts
Your hinge is set too hot to allow you to draw it with equal tension across your fingers. Because of that you are holding way too much tension in your index and the release simply can't rotate unless there is more tension on the outside of the head.

Basically you need a complete rewrite of your hinge shooting. Padgett has the best articles for this, I'd recommend sending him a PM.

Grant

P.S. my hinge shoots sooner in the shot window than my thumb.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Buy a Tru Ball Sweet spot and use it until you are comfortable with BT.

Jess
Already have one. I'm comfortable with a hinge, have over 5000 shots on it. When I turn the safety off, it's like TP with a thumb trigger. Same with a click. I understand that's fairly common.
Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter #10

Fast forward to 6:43 to start their demonstration. This is one of the best videos for this.
That's exactly what my problem is. As they mention, I can pull all day with my index finger and it won't go off. I didn't start out with it set fast. There's been a lot of hours of shooting and a lot of 1/4 turns to get to where I am now, about 4 full turns faster. I need to pull back with the index finger and post so I don't launch an arrow, or at least don't feel like I will. Had it set slow enough to pull back with all the fingers but then had accidental releases so that's not for me.

Can't do the relaxing of the index finger. Tried that awhile back and let go of my release. Costed me a few stiches in my bow hand. I know of others that have done that.

Thanks everyone for the suggestions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,858 Posts
Based on your last two posts you have had it set too hot from the beginning. If you can't draw with equal pressures then it's too hot.

A hinge won't cure TP, it can help change your process which can lead to control of your shot. But it will not change the process on its own.

Grant
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Based on your last two posts you have had it set too hot from the beginning. If you can't draw with equal pressures then it's too hot.

A hinge won't cure TP, it can help change your process which can lead to control of your shot. But it will not change the process on its own.

Grant
Shooting a hinge, I don't experience any TP if it goes off, that's why I'm trying to make it work. I have a lot of time in with it and have tried it many times over the years.
I don't disagree I may have had the hinge set not slow enough from the start but as many have experienced, if the hinge goes off when you pull it back, it's a problem and that may be enough for many to never try it again. I found the hinge completely safe from going off on the draw pulling back with the index finger and peg. I understand this is a very common way of using it and is mentioned in this review of the Truball HBX:

There are two different types of hinge shooters. Those that draw the bow back with all of the pressure on the thumb peg and index finger and those that use a percentage of the pressure spread throughout the thumb, index, middle, and ring fingers. The first group will have their release set really hot because they rely on it swiveling off the index as they let go of the thumb peg, or loosen the thumb up some allowing the release to rotate. The second group will use a manipulation method of some sort after releasing the thumb from the peg or pull through their shot using their back muscles.

If you’re in the first group, go out and buy this release. Now! It’s designed just for you.

https://rcrchery.wordpress.com/2015/08/15/t-r-u-ball-hbx-review/

Or the video already mentioned at https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=VOoa-dYjl18
6:43 into it.

I'm not saying the index finger & thumb peg is correct but it works for me not letting it go off during the draw.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,738 Posts
Hello,

I switched to a Stan hinge from a thumb trigger and it takes forever to go off. I have it set almost as lite as it will go and it's still slow. For me to pull it back safely I have the post and index finger as the main tension when drawing back. My ring finger is pointing forward. This is the only way I can draw the bow and not have an unexpected shot. Once at anchor, my index finger has all the tension and most shots I can barely get it to go off so I just punch the shot before I get too shaky. I think my problem is having all the tension on my index finger but I don't see a way to change that.

Any ideas?

Thanks
P.S. I'm not a newbie.
Almost as light as it will go?

But still too cold for you?

I don't want to over complicate things.....but just make it lighter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,858 Posts
A couple of things:
In order to shoot a hinge you need to know it WILL fire. That isn't to say you know when it will fire, but if you are just standing there doing nothing and waiting for it to fire you will never shoot it well.

If you have it set so hot that you have to hold zero pressure on the outside to draw then all you've got is a trigger with a really long, heavy pull. A pull that varies a LOT with how much tension is in your index. Trying to command shoot a hinge is going to be a failure.

My hinge has very little movement after anchor, I have zero worry about it firing during the draw. So long as I'm on the peg it's not going to rotate. Once I'm at anchor my thumb pressure comes off, my hinge clicks and I just expand while keeping pressure on my index until it fires. If it runs long I let down.

Conversely you can hold even pressure on the outside and relax your index. I find that makes my shot too passive, but for someone in your case it may work. You can also simply allow your hand to stretch/flatten and that will fire it. There are almost limitless correct ways to fire a hinge.

The take-away is this:
A properly set hinge will be stress free to draw and will fire reliably. If it's too hot it won't do either.
You need to shift your focus onto the motion that fires the hinge rather than on firing the hinge. Command shooting a hinge just doesn't work.

Grant
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,738 Posts
I shoot a 6 thousand click on my Stan.

My click is used to set my back elbow into position. I don't begin aiming until my click is in place. If I was aiming and heard the click I'd flinch.

Get to click begin aiming and execute the shot
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,596 Posts
In an effort to get your hinge to go off faster, you've actually slowed it way down because you have to have all the pressure on your index finger. I recommend you use the click and set the hinge on the cold side. That way you can draw and hit the click when you come to anchor. Then aim and execute the shot. That will allow you to have more even pressure on all your fingers and it won't take as much to get the release to go off.

If you don't like the click to shake your sight, learn to get to the click as you hit anchor. If you don't hit the click by the time you've started to aim, let down and start again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
I shoot a 6 thousand click on my Stan.

My click is used to set my back elbow into position. I don't begin aiming until my click is in place. If I was aiming and heard the click I'd flinch.

Get to click begin aiming and execute the shot
I think you guys hit it exactly on how I used the click. It may be worth another try. My problem with getting the click before aiming is I have a lifetime of aiming during the draw, pointing the arrow at the target while I draw so once at anchor, I'm already starting to aim.

Stan offers a 10 thousands click they rate as medium. Would that be better at this point? Carter has their 2 Moons that's adjustable out to 30 thousands so there must be a use for a slower click.

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,738 Posts
I think you guys hit it exactly on how I used the click. It may be worth another try. My problem with getting the click before aiming is I have a lifetime of aiming during the draw, pointing the arrow at the target while I draw so once at anchor, I'm already starting to aim.

Stan offers a 10 thousands click they rate as medium. Would that be better at this point? Carter has their 2 Moons that's adjustable out to 30 thousands so there must be a use for a slower click.

Thanks
change your mindset from aiming before the draw to pointing - get to full draw, use click to set your body mechanics into position ....you will be looking through your peep and getting the pin in the area at this point. But don't start the full hard process of aiming until after the click
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,365 Posts
Hello,

I switched to a Stan hinge from a thumb trigger and it takes forever to go off. I have it set almost as lite as it will go and it's still slow. For me to pull it back safely I have the post and index finger as the main tension when drawing back. My ring finger is pointing forward. This is the only way I can draw the bow and not have an unexpected shot. Once at anchor, my index finger has all the tension and most shots I can barely get it to go off so I just punch the shot before I get too shaky. I think my problem is having all the tension on my index finger but I don't see a way to change that.

Any ideas?

Thanks
P.S. I'm not a newbie.
Read through my hinge set up and then watch the video along with it here How I Set Up A Hinge Release | rcrchery
https://rcrchery.wordpress.com/2015/12/19/how-i-set-up-a-hinge-release/

This will give you a step by step way to set up and use a hinge to its fullest. If you have any questions along the way definitely let me know. [email protected] is my email.
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top