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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Although my bow poundage is right and my form is good, the bow is still shaking a lot.

Any idea's on how to correct this are much appreciated.
 

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I noticed when my DL was to long I had a harder time holding steady..don't know if that's your issue, just a suggestion..Also, squeezing both sides of back equally helps as well.. good luck
 

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When you assume your draw length and poundage is right but you still are shaking, you just hindered yourself from fixing the problem.
 

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What kinda stabilizer are you using..could be a form issue grip problem or a set up issue with the bow not fitting you
 

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How do you know your form is good? There are several factors that contribute but a draw length that allows you to have the form that is supported with your back muscles and not your shoulders and arms so much is important. A relaxed grip will help too. You will never be able to hold perfectly still but "shaky" can be improved. Check out rcr archery's articles on pin float
 

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Shake is in the bow holding arm part 2 of your poundage so its still high.

Pulling into the wall to hard is a issue as well for some.

Panic is a word bandied about often.
 

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Strength training would help, and how old are you. I think the older you are the shakier you are.
 

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Your bow may fit perfectly, but you'll still have a shaky sight picture if you don't relax muscles that aren't needed to hold at full draw.
It takes practice... and it's best practiced with eyes closed. You can totally concentrate on what every muscle is doing with your eyes closed. It's very tough to focus on muscles if your eyes are open.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I'm 37, I went to my local store b where they checked my form draw length and poundage I had it a little high so we brought it down. I noticed that it still shock.

Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk
 

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I recently bought a compound bow, moving from a recurve. My recurve was 45# and the compound is #60. The store owner told me that I should go with a 70# but I was nervous about moving up that much. Anyway, I ended up buying one of those bow strengthening things off of Amazon that helps build up your back and shoulders. I must say, after a few weeks, I was more confident with the compound at 60#, and my recurve shooting was much more steady. I think a little more focus on strengthening and form will help get rid of the shake. It sure helped me.
 

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The muscles you use to draw and hold a bow are not muscles that you use in your daily life. 'Unless you shoot every day".
So by developing the correct drawing and holding muscles over time will help with steadiness. Nobody gets steady over night.
You can buy a bow training device or you can shoot more.
I tell people to shoot 30 arrows every day for a month. At the end of the month I bet you will see an increase in your steadiness.
 

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The first thing you need to look at is your bow arm shoulder. It needs to be low as it will go. This puts bone on bone. The more muscle you use to support the bow the more sight movement you will see.

Relax the muscles in the top of your shoulders and at the base of the neck. Again it's all those little muscle twitches that cause sight pin movement.

Then don't try to force the pin into the middle. Put your eyes on the middle of the target and let the pin float. As long as the pin is relatively close to the center the arrow will go there.

Low front shoulder and just relax.
 

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You should post a "hows my form thread". I'm sure you'll get a lot of feed back on things to try and get your form the best it can be. Theres a lot of different things to work on that will effect your hold.
I'm 37, I went to my local store b where they checked my form draw length and poundage I had it a little high so we brought it down. I noticed that it still shock.

Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk
 

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Form, draw length, d loop length, vertical nock height location, draw weight and stabilizer set up are all possible things to look at.
 

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The single most important aspect to get correct is your form and your draw length/loop length. When these are perfect, you'll see the biggest benefits in holding steady. After that, customizing aspects of the bow, holding weight, peak weight, and stabilizer set up all can aide in making the hold better. It's an unfortunate statement I have to make, but I've found most shops will not get you dialed in where you need to be if you want the absolute best hold you can achieve. That's because it takes effort and time over just a few minutes during set up. Perfect form and then dialing in draw length and loop length down to the 16th of an inch is where a good coach comes in.

I have several articles and some videos on my website listed below in my signature that give great starting points and a lot of information I've collected over time from my own trial and error or from sources I had available to me. I even have links of some of the resources I've used and feel I can stand behind on my website as well.

If you're needing more than that, I can help you there as well. I have my email under the coaching and contact information tab on my site and I'd be glad to talk to you more no things.
I'm 37, I went to my local store b where they checked my form draw length and poundage I had it a little high so we brought it down. I noticed that it still shock.

Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk
 

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I agree that setup is very important but beyond that there is a physical limitation for all of us as well. I know several people that shake at full draw, it's not their setup it's how they are both physical and mental. You may find as you grow older it is harder and harder to hold steady.
 

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When you assume your draw length and poundage is right but you still are shaking, you just hindered yourself from fixing the problem.
Much agreed with this. As soon as you think this way you have removed yourself from thinking objectively about the problem. As much as stabilizer systems and other ideas can help with unsteadiness the single biggest factors I've found are usually draw length and/or draw weight related. That's usually the time to find a good coach and listen to him/her.
 

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I would guess you're tight. Probably in your shoulders and bow arm. Excess tension anywhere is a problem when shooting anything, playing any sport, or basically just moving. Most people carry enormous amounts of tension in their bodies and are completely unaware. If your set up is truly good, then I'd almost guarantee you're holding excess tension in your upper torso and arms. You hear a lot about "bone on bone" which is part of Alexander technique. Sit in a chair and close your eyes and try to relax your body to the point that you actually feel your skeleton supporting your weight instead of your muscles. After that, do the same thing standing up. You want to feel like your body is hanging on your skeleton and that the bones in your feet are supporting your entire structure. These two things will help you start to understand that "bone to bone" relationship that guys feel is so important to stability. Google Alexander technique and read a little, I bet you get steadier.
 
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