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For those of you that make your own scent killer or have made it in the past tell me some of you opinions on it. I am considering makein me a 5 gal bucket of it. Does it work as well as the stuff you buy from the store. Ive read the study done by DDH and it showed to be somewhat effective to some of the marketed brands. yet we as hunters have our own experiences. Opinions please
 

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The stuff I made worked just as good as any iv bought.boiled acorn with distiled water till the water was nice and brown let cool then crush up carbon stuff from fishtank filters.worked. for me
 

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My cousin and I made our own. Worked great. He had the best story- five minutes after he walked into his stand a deer walked down the same trail and never even knew he was there. The stuff works.
 

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Yup, this is the recipe I use and it works. Nothing is going to 100% completely mask your scent, but by using proper techniques you certainly can control it some (keep downwind of deer, wear kneehigh rubber boots, use this spray, walk slowly so you don't sweat, store your clothes in a rubbermaid tote with native vegetation, etc.). You can also use this stuff for anything stinky around the house - smelly shoes, stinky antler plates, etc. - it works great for that too!

"Scent-No-Mo” Spray (home-made)
Ingredients:
16 oz. (2 cups) hydrogen peroxide, 3% solution (normal brown bottle type found in drug stores)
16 oz. (2 cups) distilled water
1/4 cup baking soda
1 oz. unscented shampoo (Wildlife Research Center Scent Killer green unscented shampoo works very well)
Note: remember ) 32 oz. = 1 quart; expand ingredient amounts proportionately for larger amount of end product.
Directions:
(1) Mix ingredients in large bowl so baking soda dissolves (water, then peroxide, then baking soda, then soap).
(2) Pour into clean 1 gal. plastic milk jug (easily found in most homes). Note: do not shake!
(3) Let sit at moderate temperature for several days until chemical reaction settles down. Note: do not leave in tightly sealed container (use milk jug with snap-on cap)!
(4) Pour prepared mixture into spray bottle(s) of your choosing.
HAPPY HUNTING!
 

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It works just as well as the store bought. I can make about 3 gal for the price of one store bought 32oz bottle. Make up a batch and see for your self.
 

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So far I'd have to say the homemade stuff is as good as anything I've bought in the past. I've had deer walk right under my tree on numerous occasions over the years and never been busted. In the 3 years I've been making my own stuff I've never been busted by a deer that I saw. I keep my hunting partner stocked up as well and he's has the same results.
 

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So, it DOESN'T have a real short shelf life (I guess you could use that term)? I heard somewhere that you needed to use it within a couple of weeks after making it.
 

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distilled water and Watkins Vanilla Extract. add 2 tsp of extract to 10 oz of distilled water. i put it in a 12 oz spray bottle and apply to my boots when i walk into my stand. i have been doing this for many years. i bottle lasts about 3 weeks for me. but i hunt a lot.

Tony
 

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Yup, this is the recipe I use and it works. Nothing is going to 100% completely mask your scent, but by using proper techniques you certainly can control it some (keep downwind of deer, wear kneehigh rubber boots, use this spray, walk slowly so you don't sweat, store your clothes in a rubbermaid tote with native vegetation, etc.). You can also use this stuff for anything stinky around the house - smelly shoes, stinky antler plates, etc. - it works great for that too!

"Scent-No-Mo” Spray (home-made)
Ingredients:
16 oz. (2 cups) hydrogen peroxide, 3% solution (normal brown bottle type found in drug stores)
16 oz. (2 cups) distilled water
1/4 cup baking soda
1 oz. unscented shampoo (Wildlife Research Center Scent Killer green unscented shampoo works very well)
Note: remember ) 32 oz. = 1 quart; expand ingredient amounts proportionately for larger amount of end product.
Directions:
(1) Mix ingredients in large bowl so baking soda dissolves (water, then peroxide, then baking soda, then soap).
(2) Pour into clean 1 gal. plastic milk jug (easily found in most homes). Note: do not shake!
(3) Let sit at moderate temperature for several days until chemical reaction settles down. Note: do not leave in tightly sealed container (use milk jug with snap-on cap)!
(4) Pour prepared mixture into spray bottle(s) of your choosing.
HAPPY HUNTING!

Same as I use. Works great.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
yep that is the recipe that i have got. I wondered how i could "scent it up' guess you may say by using acorns or pine needles and maybe some kind of fruit. Im glad to hear of these good stories cause im going to try it. About the shelf life of "the stuff" as it seems to be known as has anyone else noticed there is a lil window of time that you need to use it in.
 

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How long is the mix good for before I should throw it out?
 

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To address the shelf life question, I really don't know and have wondered the same myself. I typically make up batches around 64oz, enough to fill 2 32oz spray bottles from Home Depot. I usually make 2 batches per season. I will tell you from experience that you must vent the bottles as the reaction between the peroxide and baking soda continues long after it is made. I store extra scent killer in a clean windshield washer fluid type gallon bottle with a twist on cap. The cap is never fully tight to allow for expansion of gases. I am still working on the same bottle of peroxide from a couple years ago. I purchased 27% peroxide from a pool supply place and dilute accordingly. It is always stored in a cool, dry, dark, cabinet in my garage.

Also you will get a build up of dried baking soda in the nozzle of your sprayer, just rinse it out from time to time. Your gear will also get a slight white powedery film with constant usage, kind of like the black residue from carbon based sprays. I notice it mostly on my treestand. When it gets to the point I believe it to be too much, I just wash my gear.
 

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Shelf life

To address the shelf life question, I really don't know and have wondered the same myself. I typically make up batches around 64oz, enough to fill 2 32oz spray bottles from Home Depot. I usually make 2 batches per season. I will tell you from experience that you must vent the bottles as the reaction between the peroxide and baking soda continues long after it is made. I store extra scent killer in a clean windshield washer fluid type gallon bottle with a twist on cap. The cap is never fully tight to allow for expansion of gases. I am still working on the same bottle of peroxide from a couple years ago. I purchased 27% peroxide from a pool supply place and dilute accordingly. It is always stored in a cool, dry, dark, cabinet in my garage.

Also you will get a build up of dried baking soda in the nozzle of your sprayer, just rinse it out from time to time. Your gear will also get a slight white powedery film with constant usage, kind of like the black residue from carbon based sprays. I notice it mostly on my treestand. When it gets to the point I believe it to be too much, I just wash my gear.
Remember something here which will dramatically affect shelf life. Hydrogen peroxide is photo-reactive- it will break down when exposed to light. I use opaque bottles for both the large batches and the spray bottle I take in the field. Note the hydrogen peroxide you buy in the stores is always in dark, light-proof bottles for this reason. Used chlorine bleach bottles work well if not stored in direct light. I have an old "Silver Extreme" scent eliminator spray bottle which is black that I use for a field bottle. If stored away from high heat and light I have used stuff I made the previous season and it is still good. I bought a bottle of the concentrated H2O2 at the pool store (it's called Bacquacil). It was $15.00 and you can make gallons upon gallons of scent spray with it. It doesn't have that smelly preservative used in the medicinal stuff(pure H2O2 is odorless). Hope this helps. Also, I am not sure about adding acorn or other organic material to your solution because the H2O2 will react (oxidize) with it and reduce the effectiveness of the scent spray as it will use up the H2O2. In other words the spray will be used up in trying to neutralize the acorn odor and there will less or none left to take care of undesireable odors. I make some cover scent out of either vanilla extract or soaking brown Autumn leaves and a little dirt in water. Soak it for 2-3 days then strain through a coffee filter and you have the smell of the woods in a bottle. A very small amount is all that is needed. Apply the scent neutralizer first and allow it to take care of the bad scent, then apply the cover scent for added security.
 

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Sorry- I noticed the poster who talked about adding acorns was not talking about the H2O2 spray. In any event I would not add anything else to the mix...
 

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Been using the homemade version for a while now and I will never buy name brand again. As far as shelf life goes, I always have some left over at the end of the season and I just put it up until the next season.
 

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For those of you that make your own scent killer or have made it in the past tell me some of you opinions on it. I am considering makein me a 5 gal bucket of it. Does it work as well as the stuff you buy from the store. Ive read the study done by DDH and it showed to be somewhat effective to some of the marketed brands. yet we as hunters have our own experiences. Opinions please
I pretty much make my recipe as they did in DDH...When its real warm out or early season I sometimes use one of 2 commercially available products that did better then the home made stuff did in testing
 

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Remember something here which will dramatically affect shelf life. Hydrogen peroxide is photo-reactive- it will break down when exposed to light. I use opaque bottles for both the large batches and the spray bottle I take in the field. Note the hydrogen peroxide you buy in the stores is always in dark, light-proof bottles for this reason. Used chlorine bleach bottles work well if not stored in direct light. I have an old "Silver Extreme" scent eliminator spray bottle which is black that I use for a field bottle. If stored away from high heat and light I have used stuff I made the previous season and it is still good. I bought a bottle of the concentrated H2O2 at the pool store (it's called Bacquacil). It was $15.00 and you can make gallons upon gallons of scent spray with it. It doesn't have that smelly preservative used in the medicinal stuff(pure H2O2 is odorless). Hope this helps. Also, I am not sure about adding acorn or other organic material to your solution because the H2O2 will react (oxidize) with it and reduce the effectiveness of the scent spray as it will use up the H2O2. In other words the spray will be used up in trying to neutralize the acorn odor and there will less or none left to take care of undesireable odors. I make some cover scent out of either vanilla extract or soaking brown Autumn leaves and a little dirt in water. Soak it for 2-3 days then strain through a coffee filter and you have the smell of the woods in a bottle. A very small amount is all that is needed. Apply the scent neutralizer first and allow it to take care of the bad scent, then apply the cover scent for added security.
Good point here about the dark bottles an peroxide
 

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i MAKE THE SAME STUFF AS PITE007 KILLED A 140 INCH 8 POINT LAST YEAR,WALKED IN DOWNWIND OF ME .IT WORKS
 

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I've used my homemade scent killer for about 4-5 years now, killed lots of deer too.

I think it works as good or better than store bought stuff. JMO
 
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