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NAASP
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Does anyone know what the requirements are for a camera that could record an arrow in flight slow enough to see the arrow going across the rest and to use it for tuning purposes? I want to be able to put on DVD the arrow clearing a fall-away rest.
 

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NAASP
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Discussion Starter #2
ttt
 

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Actually, you're thinking backwards. You need extreamly high speed photography. This proceedure records at very high speed, then when played at normal speed appears to be slow motion. No home video camera will do it.
 

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I recently did some research to find out exactly what equipment I needed to that very same thing, and to find out how much it costs. I will keep my findings simple. The pricing for what is required to make this happen is out of range for us mere mortals. :( I'm talking $10,000 to $50,000!!!!! Anyways if someone finds a cheap way to do this please let us all know. thx
 

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The best you can do is to record the shot on the highest speed your camera has, then playback in slow motion on your VCR. I've never tried it, but it wouldn't cost anything to try.
 

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(aka lug nut)
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NCBuckNBass said:
Does anyone know what the requirements are for a camera that could record an arrow in flight slow enough to see the arrow going across the rest and to use it for tuning purposes? I want to be able to put on DVD the arrow clearing a fall-away rest.

Speed bows these days shoot with an IBO speed rating
of 300 feet per second.

300 fps = 204.5455 miles per hour for a launch speed.

That's 3600 inches per second.

Let's say you want to capture the first 6-inches of arrow flight.

Elapsed time = 0.001667 seconds
or
1.7 thousandths of a second total flight time for 6-inches of arrow flight.

There are high speed video cameras that
can record video at 8000 frames per second.

If you freeze frame the video,
the first frame would show the arrow on the bowstring,
just leaving the release hook.

The 2nd frame would show the bow string 6-inches away.

If you wanted to capture the arrow travelling past the arrow rest,
one inch at a time, per frame,
you would need a video camera that can capture 50,000 frames per second
and a flash system that can strobe (turn on an off) at 50,000 hz.

Black and white systems do exist for about $100,000 or so.

I loaned my copy of high speed video to a fellow AT member.

It's is very cool to watch.
 
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