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Discussion Starter #1
Has anybody shot these kind of bows? Are they as easy to shoot as advertised?

They intrigue me to no end. If (when) I take one up - - as a relaxation thing, I would like to know that the $$$$ are not poured down the tubes.
 

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Here you go:
http://www.grozerarchery.com/index_m.htm

I saw these types of bows while I was visiting in Hungary 6 years ago. Even though this was before I had taken up archery, I stopped by and checked them out. You can't help not being drawn to them. They are true works of art and I imagine many many hours go into making the fancy ones with the laminated horn. One of these days, I'll treat myself to one.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
They are works of art - but functional just the same. Like I said, they speak to me......

Beauty - Art - Functionality......all in a piece of wood and horn!!
 

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A Hungarian pal took this picture at a local fair, the Hungarian version of re-enactors I guess. That's a flying target, from a moving horse. Notice the extra arrows in his left hand.
 

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I notice that the guy using the standard three finger release. Wonder how traditional that is.

Japanese archery uses a completely different release. Thumb hooks around the string with the index finger looped around the tip of the thumb. Relax the index finger and the thumb slips past it releasing the arrow. Works a lot like a mechanical release. Very cool! Wonder what prevents this technique from being used in Western archery?
 

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I shoot a Grozer Hungarian (Magyar) horse bow and it really is something else. It's nominally 30 inches draw length but you can overdraw it by quite a bit without any stacking.

Very smooth bow to shoot. Mine is 50lbs draw weight but I'm probably pulling around 55lbs with 33 inch arrows at full draw.

I tried the Asian way of shooting it (thumb ring etc) and it is difficult. The hardest thing to get used to is having the arrow on the right hand side of the bow instead of the left - although some Mongolian archers shoot the thumb ring with the arrow on the normal left hand side. I've tried it this way but I can't keep the arrow against the bow. There's gotta be some sort of trick to doing it like this.

Great bows and a hell of a lot of fun to shoot.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Running horse, moving target.......there is a lot of skill and practice there!

That Japanese release method sounds as easy or easier than the conventional way....I wonder why it isn't taught here as well. It shouldn't be hard to learn if you persevere - develop a callus and you're all set.

Corsair....as I haven't shot "traditional" yet I have a couple of nooby type questions. What is "stacking"? How does the thumb ring work? (great handle btw)

I've seen the thumb rings on some of the sites but have no idea how they are supposed to work.
 

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I've seen the thumb rings on some of the sites but have no idea how they are supposed to work.
Here's a brief description. I believe if you research it a bit, you'll find there is quite a bit of info on these types of bows and shooting on the net.
http://www.atarn.org/FAQ/thumbring.htm

Here is another source for some bows. Maybe not as fancy as the Grozer bows, but very affordable compared to the prices of some of the modern recurves you see these days and these ones seem to be readily available in North America.
Looking at some these bows, its obvious that pre-stressed parallel limbs and string supressors are nothing new from the engineering dept.:wink:
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Mike - thanks for the links. Lots of great information. Helps a lot.

Dan
 

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Hi Bow Walker

"Stacking" refers to what happens witrh some bows as you start to draw them back - they start off OK but as you continue to draw, the weight increases quite markedly until near the end they become very difficult to continue to draw back.

A "good" trad bow will have a smooth consistent pull all the way from initiation of the draw to full draw and even overdarw.

A thumb ring fits on the thumb (naturally) and is used to hook over the string. It is locked in place by putting your index finger over the top of the thumb. The following diagram may help illustrate the ring:



You could also have a look at the ATARN website which has extensive coverage of Asian bows. The web address is:

http://www.atarn.org/frameindex.htm
 

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Here's some pictures of some authentic horse bows. I took these pictures in the War museum in Vienna, Austria a couple of years ago. If my memory is correct, these ones were about 300 years old. They are not as fancy as the elaborate replicas of today, but as you can see, their laminations have survived all of this time. Sorry about the picture quality.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Corsair,
I took yours (or someone's) advice and have been doing the web search thing. Plenty of sites/info out there - as you might expect. I even found instructions on how to make a thumb ring using a billiard ball.

Thanks for clearing up the term "stacking" for me.

Have you got one of these types of bows - and have you shot with a thumb ring?

The thumb ring looks like it would not be too difficult the use (with lots of practice of course). It looks like an ancient and natural form of a mechanical release. Also looks like a strong way of drawing one of these shorter bows.

Dan.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Those pictures of yours are great, Magua. Considering you are taking them through glass.

Even if the equipment/bows are only 200 years old - although not likely - they are in remarkable shape.

From all that I have read, these bows can be quite difficult to brace or string.

Do you shoot one?
 

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That is Lucas Novotny's "Saluki Brand Bows".... they are AWESOME!!!

I'd love to have one...

check them out...

www.salukibow.com

-ZA

Bow Walker said:
Has anybody shot these kind of bows? Are they as easy to shoot as advertised?

They intrigue me to no end. If (when) I take one up - - as a relaxation thing, I would like to know that the $$$$ are not poured down the tubes.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Bin der Din Dat ZA206............still drooling.
 

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Bow Walker

Yes I have a Grozer replica Hungarian bow. I think I mentioned this earlier. Lovely bow to shoot. I made a thumb ring out of plastic and it worked OK but they are a bit of a chore to learn how to shoot properlyu.

Having the arrow on the right side of the bow takes some getting used to and I have to confess I never enjoyed the experience.
 
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