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I am using brass inserts on my Easton Axis traditional arrows for hunting and target. I've had no problem using Hot melt so far and makes it easier to adjust or tune when I use hot melt.( Either Blue or Gold ) I am wondering what every one else uses and the pros and cons of hot melt versus epoxy in a " hunting arrow " broadhead setup with lower poundage bows.
 

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W -

LOW TEMP hot melt.

Viper1 out.
 

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In addition to the low temp hot melt Easton does recommend a couple of epoxy products. See Easton site. The thing about 2 part epoxy is I never need a whole tube and it eventually gets thrown out. On the other hand I can never seem to get excess hot melt wiped off, not a problem with epoxy. Never been able to install a broadhead aligned the way I want it with either one: always requires additional tweeking. All things considered 99% of the time I use the blue low temp hot melt.
 

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In addition to the low temp hot melt Easton does recommend a couple of epoxy products. See Easton site. The thing about 2 part epoxy is I never need a whole tube and it eventually gets thrown out. On the other hand I can never seem to get excess hot melt wiped off, not a problem with epoxy. Never been able to install a broadhead aligned the way I want it with either one: always requires additional tweeking. All things considered 99% of the time I use the blue low temp hot melt.
Thanks for reply !! For lining up my broadheads I put one of those tiny o-rings you often get on limb bolts used on 3 piece trad bows. You can get a couple dozen cheap from many of the bowyers. They squash pretty good when yo tighten the broadhead and allow you enough lee way to rotate your broadheads. Either Montec G5s or Muzzy phantoms.
 

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I use OMP brand fletching glue on my stainless steel inserts. I run small diameter carbon. .204 ID. Not much room for hot glue. Plus, if I were to glob a bunch down the shaft. It'll add a few grains of weight.

As for using an epoxy. No way. I get arrows stuck in all kinds of things. Sometimes its a two hand and a foot removal process to get it out. I've never had an insert loosen in the slight. Using plain old fletching glue.

When I do remove an insert. There's an acetone soak going on. Otherwise, it ain't coming out. You can bang on the back side with a rod. Won't budge.
 

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Carbons, 2 part slow cure golf shaft epoxy. Aluminums I use Big Jim’s hot melt, and woods also. I don’t putz around changing inserts, brass or aluminum once they’re done they’re done. I know guys who use the low temp stuff and every once in awhile they leave an insert in a target. Proper cleaning of shaft?, maybe. I use a bore brush and Acetone to clean carbons. Only time that epoxy failed me was when I shot a piece of rebar. The impact bent the point, cracked the aluminum footing which peeled off. It was on using same epoxy. it was a Axis shaft by- the-way. Been doing it this way since about 2005, to old to change.
 

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I am using brass inserts on my Easton Axis traditional arrows for hunting and target. I've had no problem using Hot melt so far and makes it easier to adjust or tune when I use hot melt.( Either Blue or Gold ) I am wondering what every one else uses and the pros and cons of hot melt versus epoxy in a " hunting arrow " broadhead setup with lower poundage bows.
just used low temp hot melt for the first time.............followed all recommendations...........lost 2 inserts and a broadhead........not sure how...........but rethinking the whole hot melt thing now.
 

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Start soaking them in acetone to get that craft glue out the shaft. If you don't have acetone. Use some WD40, mineral spirit, gasoline, or Coleman lantern fuel. Wash the shaft out, enough for real glue to hold the insert. 91% rubbing alcohol for the final cleaning.
 

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No reason to use epoxy. All that does is make it practically impossible to remove points without damaging the shaft. Low temp hot melt works great. Just heat the insert....not the arrow shaft when inserting. It works just fine and you won't lose points as long as you don't use too much.
 

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Years ago when the ACE first came out Easton cautioned against using acetone on their carbon shafts. I would be very hesitant to use WD40, mineral spirits. gasoline or dematured alcohol (Coleman lantern fuel) on any carbon shaft. Remember your chemistry polars disolve polars and non polars disolve non polars. When in doubt soap and water or better yet read the manufacturers instructions including all of those seemingly endless caution statements. Not that I don't make good use of disposing of petrochemicals. When starting a brush fire my wife will remind me "No
accelerant". To which OK honey is followed by a big woosh.
 

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Years ago when the ACE first came out Easton cautioned against using acetone on their carbon shafts. I would be very hesitant to use WD40, mineral spirits. gasoline or dematured alcohol (Coleman lantern fuel) on any carbon shaft. Remember your chemistry polars disolve polars and non polars disolve non polars. When in doubt soap and water or better yet read the manufacturers instructions including all of those seemingly endless caution statements. Not that I don't make good use of disposing of petrochemicals. When starting a brush fire my wife will remind me "No
accelerant". To which OK honey is followed by a big woosh.
Mine are Gold Tip. Its what they recommend to take glue off the carbon. Acetone will eat nocks. Its the only thing on the arrow you can't stick it acetone.

Why would Easton use a carbon fiber that doesn't withstand the same?
 

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just used low temp hot melt for the first time.............followed all recommendations...........lost 2 inserts and a broadhead........not sure how...........but rethinking the whole hot melt thing now.
You need to abrase the inside of the shaft and the insert with some sandpaper, also clean the surfaces off with acetone as glock said or use rubbing alchohol if you dont want to use acetone.
 

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I am a big fan of hot melt- so easy to re-point your arrow and it seems to hold up well from hot temps in the summer down to minus 15F in the winter. I used to use Gold Tip CA glue for my inserts and had zero problem with that all in carbon arrows. So either works well if you do it correctly but if you want to re-point your arrows hot glue is the way to go. If I were going to use inserts probably would stick with GT CA glue but for glue in points I favor hot melt.
 

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Man every thread either is heavily weighted toward epoxy or hot melt! This rounds match goes to hot melt.
 

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Big Jim’s Quick Stick. It’s a hit melt glue, and is the cats meow for inserts!!!!! I do not clean the inside of the shaft at all. I have used this glue to install both aluminum and brass inserts in GT and Easton FMJ and Widowmaker carbon shafts, and never lose inserts.

Bisch


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Guys -

For people who get into "trad" because of it's simplicity, it's amazing how many things get over complicated.
BTW - Low temp hot melt has been the standard for well over 1/2 a century, until people forgot how to use it.

Viper1 out.
 

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You need to abrase the inside of the shaft and the insert with some sandpaper, also clean the surfaces off with acetone as glock said or use rubbing alchohol if you dont want to use acetone.
Did all that


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Roof, grid -

Actually, I usually don't bother. A pass or two with a bore brush does it.

Viper1 out.
 
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