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I have some easton fatboy carbon arrows I'm going to build. They have G uni bushings and the points are 120gr inserts (no thread, the field point is the insert). Excuse my target arrow build ignorance.

I build my hunting arrows with easton HIT epoxy. I don't think that's necessary here though.

I've watched videos of people using hot melt. And I know allot of people use some sort of super glue.

What should I use for these inserts and why??
 

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If you use the HIT epoxy or super glue, you will not be able to remove the points if you need to.
I use hot / cool melt or blue cool melt and craft store glue stick mixed together. I haven't had any points pulled out lately.
 

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Gorilla hot melt. I found it to be the best and strongest but pretty cost effective too.
 

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I have some easton fatboy carbon arrows I'm going to build. They have G uni bushings and the points are 120gr inserts (no thread, the field point is the insert). Excuse my target arrow build ignorance.

I build my hunting arrows with easton HIT epoxy. I don't think that's necessary here though.

I've watched videos of people using hot melt. And I know allot of people use some sort of super glue.

What should I use for these inserts and why??
The G-nocks just push into the unibushing. No glue required.

The 120 grain "inserts no thread", are called target POINTS.
The shaft of target points have no threads. So, that means you use hot melt to glue in TARGET points.

Nope, a lot of people do NOT use super glue, to install target points.
Target points are installed with Hot Melt glue, so you can remove the target point and try a different weight later.

Take a stick of hot melt, and heat the end of the hot melt stick. When the color goes clear,
and the end of the hot melt stick goes bubbly, take the hot melt stick out of the propane torch flame.
Smear a blob of hot melt on the end of the arrow shaft. Yes, the hot melt blob on the end of the shaft will cool down and solidify. That's ok.

Now, hold the target point, with the shaft with no threads, in some pliers.
Heat up the stick of hot melt again, by putting the stick of hot melt into the propane torch flame.
The color will go clear and the end of the hot melt stick will get bubbly.
SMEAR the hot melt stick onto the shaft of the target point, the point with no threads
like spreading peanut butter.

When you have too much hot melt smeared on the shaft of the target point,
rotate the point and insert the HOT target point through the blob of hot melt on the end of the arrow shaft.
Cuz the fit is sooooo tight, most of the hot melt will create a donut ring around the end of the arrow shaft tube.
Cuz you are shoving the HOT target point through the blob of hot melt, this guarantees that you will have a thin film
of hot melt between the arrow shaft inside walls and the outside of the target point shaft.

PUsh the now warm target point 1/3rd of the way into the arrow shaft.
Wait 2-3 seconds. Now, push the warm target point 2/3rds of the way into the arrow shaft.
Wait 2-3 seconds, for the hot melt to continue to cool, and it gets a little stiffer to push in the target point.
Now, push the target point all the way into the arrow shaft,
and dip the target point and arrow, into a cup of cold water.

This will cool the hot melt all the way back to solid, and the target point is now installed.

BUT, what do I do about this DONUT ring of hot melt at the end of the carbon tube?
Well, test the donut and see if the donut ring of hot melt is stiff. IF the donut ring of hot melt is not stiff yet,
dunk again into the cold cup of water, or do this by the kitchen sink, and hold the arrow under cold running water.
When the donut ring of hot melt is cold enough, the donut ring will be stiff enough to CLEANLY tear away from the arrow shaft, by prying off the donut ring with your fingertips.
 

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I have some easton fatboy carbon arrows I'm going to build. They have G uni bushings and the points are 120gr inserts (no thread, the field point is the insert). Excuse my target arrow build ignorance.

I build my hunting arrows with easton HIT epoxy. I don't think that's necessary here though.

I've watched videos of people using hot melt. And I know allot of people use some sort of super glue.

What should I use for these inserts and why??

Target points are not inserts, and that's why they don't have external threads.
So, what if you decide later that 120 grain TARGET points are not heavy enough,
and you wanna try 150 grain TARGET points?

Simple. Put the end of the HOT MELT installed target points into boiling water. Water will only go up to 212 degrees F.
The carbon will be just fine. The boiling water will ONLY melt the hot melt and you can easily remove the HOT melt installed target points with some pliers. That's why we USE hot melt for target points...and not epoxy,
and NEVER super glue.
 

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I use Bohning cool melt (blue) glue on all my carbon arrows. Really easy to remove points if necessary, all you need is a few seconds in hot water and you can pull them right out. On my hunting arrows I am able to use the same trick to align my broadheads how I want them.

Been using it for 10 years and have never had a point come out
 

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I use low temp Hot Melt.
 

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I use Gold Tip tip grip super glue to PERMANENTLY glue my VAP bullet points into the VAP shafts. Easy breezy. Never had one come loose.

Sent from my SM-G973U using Tapatalk
 

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This is the first year i started using cool melt and i will never go back to permanent glue. Its great being able to remove, adjust and to try diff stuff or fix damaged inserts or whatever.
 

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I just use craft store glue sticks. Never had an insert pull out. I like it cause I can just heat it a little to index my broadheads.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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just an couple hours ago i pulled some target points that were glued in with 5 min epoxy. i hold the tip over one one dividual jet of my kitchen stove flame for a few minutes and they came right out. l prefer to use 5 minute epoxy because i've lost a couple tips that i installed with Bohning hot melt. the 5 minute stuff holds a little better and still softens easily enough to not cause damage to the shaft if you are careful to keep the flame off the shaft and just get the point hot enough to soften the glue. i will admit,... in the past, i have wrecked a few shaft ends by getting them too hot, but luckily all i had to do is cut off the damaged part and match the rest of the shafts to it. the good thing is that the big target shafts are so overspine at any length, it doesn't really matter if you have to shorten them a bit.
 

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I've been using low temp hot melt from the craft store for many dozens of arrows now and I've yet to have an insert or point pull out. Seen several come out of shafts that were installed with cyano(super) glue. I bought a bag of glue sticks for $5, glued hundreds of points/inserts/bushings in and still have 3/4 of the bag left at least. Seems like pretty good value to me.
 

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I have had nocks that are friction fitted into the shaft and some were loose enough to pop off occasionally when they hit the target. I used contact cement to get them to stay in. At some point I needed to re-index the nocks for a different arrow rest and was able to use boiling water to soften the contact cement. I think this could possibly work for tips as well, but I have never tried it. Contact cement has good holding power and also doesn't cure to a brittle state.

I noticed on Black Eagles site they say hot melt is not recommended for their arrows. Any ideas why?
 

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I have had nocks that are friction fitted into the shaft and some were loose enough to pop off occasionally when they hit the target. I used contact cement to get them to stay in. At some point I needed to re-index the nocks for a different arrow rest and was able to use boiling water to soften the contact cement. I think this could possibly work for tips as well, but I have never tried it. Contact cement has good holding power and also doesn't cure to a brittle state.

I noticed on Black Eagles site they say hot melt is not recommended for their arrows. Any ideas why?

Many manufacturers recommend against hot melt, it's sort of a CYA thing because if they don't someone will overheat the shaft, have a catastrophic failure, and blame the company.

It's the resin that is the concern, and while there areprocesses to design/use higher temp resins, doubtful the expense goes into arrows... Typical resins can soften and deform in the 212-350F range, and the shaft may deform but retain most of its structural integrity once cooled; Degredation can begin to occur in the low 400s [cheaper resins may go below that, again not sure the quality of resin or processing used in the arrow industry]. For carbons, I use a multi-temp glue gun on the low setting, my glue temp may be in the 250F range [according to the gun specs], and I have yet to have a shaft warp or fail [but I do place in ice water as soon as the point/insert is set, so actual carbon temp is probably well below 250F; it certainly doesn't boil the water upon insertion, which would be about 200F at my altitude]. I did have one shaft splinter when I tried using the high temp setting on my gun [approximate temp in the 450F range according to specs], while seating the point, can't say definitively if it was a temp issue or perhaps I just didn't have the point square to the shaft when I forced it in.

On aluminums [since I'm rambling anyway], I use the high temp setting- only because the desription of the Gorilla sticks I use suggests high temp for durable bonds and lower temps for delicate ones- perhaps the higher temp allows the glue to bond better, but can't back that up... It's just in my mind and we all know how that goes.
Since I don't torch the glue, apply to the point, and torch again, I use the glue gun for application and I place all the tips/inserts on one of those coffee cup warmers- heats tips/inserts to the 180F neighborhood [that's the temp it will bring fluids to, could be more directly on the heating plate; barely too hot to handle for long periods but won't boil water if dropped in a glass, so again 200F or less]; Gives me extended working timeand allows the glue to melt into the nooks and cranies of the tip/insert a little better; just has to stay in the cooling bath a little longer to fully cool].

To pull them I boil [a little longer than the usual 15-20 seconds recommended, but again lower boiling point of water here], then use a thin 30" metal rod inserted through the nock end to poke the tip out.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I ordered some of the bohning low temp hot melt for carbon (what I linked above). I do have a glue gun, but it's a children's one for arts and crafts (no temp control). I figure for $4 I might as well try the stuff "made" for this specifically and change the technique if this doesn't work out.
 

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I ordered some of the bohning low temp hot melt for carbon (what I linked above). I do have a glue gun, but it's a children's one for arts and crafts (no temp control). I figure for $4 I might as well try the stuff "made" for this specifically and change the technique if this doesn't work out.

Only reason I don't use the Bohning sticks is they aren't round and won't fit the gun.
 
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