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Discussion Starter #1
i used to be on this site, well, ALOT. But life happened and so i put the bow down for a couple of years. Happy to say that I am getting back in the game.

my question is kind of obscure I guess. But I have been noticing now more than previously in my indoor shooting efforts that I have become more ACTIVE. by that I mean that I used to think it was bad to help the release aid during the shot, and now i am using not only back muscles but hand and forearm muscles to move through the shot process. I have matured alot in this 2 year hiatus from archery and my shoot has definitely become more natural and consistent.

so, what is the opinion on activity during the shot process?
 

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A lot of very good shooters use hand and arm muscles in addition to back muscles to manipulate the release. I try to think of my fingers as just hooks and execute with only back muscles, but to do that I have to set my release with very little travel.

In general I think that most are holding with the back, but executing with hand and arm.

It's tough to see with the better shooters. With most of them, it looks like they are just standing there and it goes off without any movement of hand or arm.

It may be that most of them don't consciously know what they are doing. Everything is at a subconscious level.
 

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I agree with AllenRead. I like to keep a consistant grip and the same tension in my hand (maybe a VERY sssslllliiiiiggghhhhht relaxation of the hand after anchoring), and only move my back muscles to make the shot go off. But I have the release set really hot too! :wink:

Lien2
 

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Discussion Starter #4
thanks!

i understand the subconscious aspect of archery, and how most things should happen w/o thinking about it.

just looking for thoughts and opinions on movement/activity during the shot
 

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I don't think that there are any hard and fast rules for the amount of movement or activity during execution. It just has to be smooth & even with no hesitation.
 

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After watching the Vegas 2009 shootoff I was amazed at the different shooting styles. Can't think of the guys name but he won and had the most herky jerky style of anyone in my opinion. Now how could I possibly tell him he was doing something wrong?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
good point, i am shooting fairly well right now so i would have to say that it cant be that bad of a thing. Just curious to see what the overall outlook on this matter is here on AT.
 

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After watching the Vegas 2009 shootoff I was amazed at the different shooting styles. Can't think of the guys name but he won and had the most herky jerky style of anyone in my opinion. Now how could I possibly tell him he was doing something wrong?
His name is Reo Wilde, and he is a GREAT shooter
 

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Hi PSE,

I too have taken a long break from shooting - once for close to I dunno ... 5-8 years, and recently for about a year.

Like you, I too was like REALLY ACTIVE on here in the past. Nowadays, I feel like a stranger in a foreign land. LOL!

What I do remember, having gone through commanding, and using back muscles only (forearm and release hand, especially, were soft as in at full draw, you could flop my release hand fingertips around simply by flicking them lightly) is that the main difference is how much a shooter can be in control of muscle tension all through out a tourney or round.

The argument for relaxation (not using shoulder and arm muscles) and using the back muslces more is two fold: muscle twitch and consistent control under mental and physical fatigue. Which approach would require less effort and offer more control/consistency in the long run kinda thing.

If you want to get into the physiology of it, read the book 'Arachery Anatomy' by Ray Axford. It's old, but it covers the basics of what happens inside the body before, during and after a shot, and with different body types and techniques.

CHEERS!
 
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