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I am having trouble with aiming my bow and keeping it steady to make a good clean shot. I always hear about how you are supposed to let the pin float on the center of the target, but I can't ever do that. I am always trying to ease my pin into the middle and then release when I reach the center:angry:. I need some help figuring out how to float my pin on the center and release with confidence. I guess I'm just not getting it. Any help at all would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.
 

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do you get a suprise release? if you cant leanr to get a suprise release its going to be very hard to let your pin float. but basically you should aim wiht you eyes and brain. focus on your aiming spot and let you pin do wat it wants to do. if you are gettting suprise releases then you arrow will go where you want it to.
 

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basically a case of target panic. try mixing up your routine, bring your pins from the opposite side or above rather than below. trying counting in your head. little things can help your process of aiming. See how your stance is and compare it to where the target is. Maybe your stance is a little too open. Also, what poundage are you shooting? Maybe you should bump your poundage down a bit and work on aiming and your drawing, aiming and shot process. Shooting too much poundage can definitely break down shooting form.
 

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I am having trouble with aiming my bow and keeping it steady to make a good clean shot. I always hear about how you are supposed to let the pin float on the center of the target, but I can't ever do that. I am always trying to ease my pin into the middle and then release when I reach the center:angry:. I need some help figuring out how to float my pin on the center and release with confidence. I guess I'm just not getting it. Any help at all would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.
sounds as if you have some form issues, post some pics and we may be able to help target your problem!
 

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I suggest drawing your bow, anchor and go immediately to the X. Once on the X just let the pin, dot, circle,ect float while staring down the X. Trust the float but keep your eyes on the X till the shot breaks. We all are human here and you have to figure in the human factor. We all cannot just get on the X and lock on. It isn't possible. What is possible is you trusting a little pin movement while staring down the X. Some days you can get on the X and the pin movement is very little. And then the next day the pin just wonders all over the place. :angry:


Breathing rhythm plays a big part in the pin movement. I found this on the net to better explain. :thumb:

These two ways are, Option 1 mostly used with developing archers, but can work equally well with experienced archers, and Option 2 for the more experienced tournament archer, who has acquired good technique.

Option 1

1. A deep diaphragmatic settling breath should be taken prior to raising the bow.
2. With the focus on the target a normal breath, using diaphragmatic breathing, is taken between Raising the Bow and Set-Up. This not only has a settling effect, but will also lower the center of gravity. Further, it will help the archer to increase their focus and aids in not rushing the draw.
3. Whilst drawing from Set-Up inhale as part of the drawing rhythm, which will create a natural feeling of gaining strength.
4. From the beginning of the Loading/Transfer to the Holding phase, when aiming should commence, approximately 30-50%the breath should be let out slowly and naturally, allowing the sight to naturally settle in the aiming area.
5. From this point the breath must be held till after the release and let out naturally during the follow-through.

******************************************************
When an archer becomes more advanced and has acquired a good technique the breathing cycle can be modified as follows.
Option2

1. A deep diaphragmatic settling breath should be taken and exhaled prior to raising the bow.
2. Whilst raising the bow inhale deeply and naturally, employing the diaphragmatic breathing technique, which will create a natural feeling of gaining strength.
3. When coming to full draw, but before anchoring, approximately 30-50% of the breath must be let out slowly and naturally and then held from this point onwards till after the release and let out naturally during the follow-through.

After 30-50% of the air has been expelled from the lungs, the breath is then held (Valsalva manoeuvre*). This will create a much more stable trunk and therefore stronger body. Also refer to Ratio of Movement under KSL Shot Cycle Step 9 and Archery Technique, elsewhere on this website

Note:
Many of the world top archers, including some Koreans, use Option 2 or some varying form of it. However, Coach Lee feels that the Option 1 breathing cycle has many advantages even for international competitive archers. By employing this first initial breath whilst raising the bow, it will settle the archer more in a rhythm and increase focus. However, whatever method is used the valsalva manoeuvre (inflated/tightened abdomen) must be employed. Nonetheless, in the end each archer must work out what works best for them.

**********************************************

Trust some slight movement of the pin while staring down the X till the shot breaks and experimenting with a breathing rhythm that best fits you. Try it and see if it works or not.Happy Shooting. ~YankeeRebel
 

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it sounds like your bow may not fit you and you are in too big of a hurry to get off the shot i used to have that problem and i cured it with a carter backstrap after using it i couldn't force the shot and i was forced to float the pin and let the release do its job i really would say the release saved me from alot of bad habits and helped my shooting very much
 

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I suggest drawing your bow, anchor and go immediately to the X. Once on the X just let the pin, dot, circle,ect float while staring down the X. Trust the float but keep your eyes on the X till the shot breaks. We all are human here and you have to figure in the human factor. We all cannot just get on the X and lock on. It isn't possible. What is possible is you trusting a little pin movement while staring down the X. Some days you can get on the X and the pin movement is very little. And then the next day the pin just wonders all over the place. :angry:


Breathing rhythm plays a big part in the pin movement. I found this on the net to better explain. :thumb:

These two ways are, Option 1 mostly used with developing archers, but can work equally well with experienced archers, and Option 2 for the more experienced tournament archer, who has acquired good technique.

Option 1

1. A deep diaphragmatic settling breath should be taken prior to raising the bow.
2. With the focus on the target a normal breath, using diaphragmatic breathing, is taken between Raising the Bow and Set-Up. This not only has a settling effect, but will also lower the center of gravity. Further, it will help the archer to increase their focus and aids in not rushing the draw.
3. Whilst drawing from Set-Up inhale as part of the drawing rhythm, which will create a natural feeling of gaining strength.
4. From the beginning of the Loading/Transfer to the Holding phase, when aiming should commence, approximately 30-50%the breath should be let out slowly and naturally, allowing the sight to naturally settle in the aiming area.
5. From this point the breath must be held till after the release and let out naturally during the follow-through.

******************************************************
When an archer becomes more advanced and has acquired a good technique the breathing cycle can be modified as follows.
Option2

1. A deep diaphragmatic settling breath should be taken and exhaled prior to raising the bow.
2. Whilst raising the bow inhale deeply and naturally, employing the diaphragmatic breathing technique, which will create a natural feeling of gaining strength.
3. When coming to full draw, but before anchoring, approximately 30-50% of the breath must be let out slowly and naturally and then held from this point onwards till after the release and let out naturally during the follow-through.

After 30-50% of the air has been expelled from the lungs, the breath is then held (Valsalva manoeuvre*). This will create a much more stable trunk and therefore stronger body. Also refer to Ratio of Movement under KSL Shot Cycle Step 9 and Archery Technique, elsewhere on this website

Note:
Many of the world top archers, including some Koreans, use Option 2 or some varying form of it. However, Coach Lee feels that the Option 1 breathing cycle has many advantages even for international competitive archers. By employing this first initial breath whilst raising the bow, it will settle the archer more in a rhythm and increase focus. However, whatever method is used the valsalva manoeuvre (inflated/tightened abdomen) must be employed. Nonetheless, in the end each archer must work out what works best for them.

**********************************************

Trust some slight movement of the pin while staring down the X till the shot breaks and experimenting with a breathing rhythm that best fits you. Try it and see if it works or not.Happy Shooting. ~YankeeRebel

YankeeRebel:

You have learned a great deal.


Allow me to explain further on the Valsalva maneuver.

1) tense up the core muscles (stomach/abdomen)

2) close your mouth and do NOT breath out the nose
(allow no air to escape)

3) hold your breath, but squeeze the diaphragm and STRAIN like you are constipated.

You get the idea.

:becky:
 

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YankeeRebel:

You have learned a great deal.


Allow me to explain further on the Valsalva maneuver.

1) tense up the core muscles (stomach/abdomen)

2) close your mouth and do NOT breath out the nose
(allow no air to escape)

3) hold your breath, but squeeze the diaphragm and STRAIN like you are constipated.

You get the idea.

:becky:
:thumb: I'm slowly getting better as I go N&B. I'm still a work in progress but I'm happy with the results thus far. Thanx for all your help my friend. :thumb:
 

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I just draw back anchor and the instant my pin settles on the spot I launch .I do not float I am a still pin shooter.The pin may be on target for a second or two then its gone .Why wait till it floats off or the wind or shakes take over .So draw to shot for me may only be a few seconds 3-4 up to 10 or 15 second .Every shot is different and my have different duration. But the shot sequince is the same for me every time.
 

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My opinion: You need to practice aiming without shooting. Then you need to practice your release. Then you bring the two together.

Aiming: Draw your bow with an arrow on it, but don't shoot. Just aim at the X. Aim for as long as you can comfortably. Then just draw down. Repeat. This will help with the anxiety of having to have the pin on the X. Just let it float. The key is that you are nearly always floating toward the center, as soon as it drifts off a bit you automatically start to bring it back. The problem with punching the trigger is not that you hit the trigger when the pin is in the wrong spot, it is that the punch causes an erratic movement that throws everything off.

Release: try the blind bail method. Get close to a rather large target. Draw, close your eyes, and work on your release without worrying about being accurate. Work on squeezing the trigger softly so that you can get a smooth surprise release.

Together: Get back to 20 yards (or whereever you like to shoot from) and draw your bow. Concentrate on the aiming and let your release hand do it's thing.

Hope this helps a little
 

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Mike.....Do you have a stabilizer on your bow?? My 12" Posten really helps balance out my shot by alowing me to let the pin float on the x as long as I want to hold it there so I can execute a proper shot and follow thru!
 

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Another thing you can try is practicing from 10 feet at a large target wall with your eyes closed. This will alow you to focus on the release, back tension, and breathing. Obvioulsy where you hit doesn't matter but after some practice you will group! Then, once you get the feeling, practice with both eyes open from longer distances say 40 or 50 yards at a large 9" bull. Its more of a mindset than physical mechanics. Hope this helps.
 

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Another thing you can try is practicing from 10 feet at a large target wall with your eyes closed. This will alow you to focus on the release, back tension, and breathing. Obvioulsy where you hit doesn't matter but after some practice you will group! Then, once you get the feeling, practice with both eyes open from longer distances say 40 or 50 yards at a large 9" bull. Its more of a mindset than physical mechanics. Hope this helps.
 

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Aiming

I am having trouble with aiming my bow and keeping it steady to make a good clean shot. I always hear about how you are supposed to let the pin float on the center of the target, but I can't ever do that. I am always trying to ease my pin into the middle and then release when I reach the center:angry:. I need some help figuring out how to float my pin on the center and release with confidence. I guess I'm just not getting it. Any help at all would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.
I draw the bow and have the pin a couple of inches below the dot and as I raise the pin it helps to steady the bow, and when I get the pin on the dot I hold it a couple seconds on the dot and then I make a smooth release. I practice this and I don't shoot the arrow if I don't have the pin on the dot. I myself don't like to float the pin. I can shoot floating it but when I do I don't shoot as good as holding on. Try it this way and if you can't hold on let back down and don't shoot an arrow until you can. Also try going back to say 40 or 50 yds. and practice, for me sometimes I can hold on the dot better at farther distances.
 

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My opinion: You need to practice aiming without shooting. Then you need to practice your release. Then you bring the two together.

Aiming: Draw your bow with an arrow on it, but don't shoot. Just aim at the X. Aim for as long as you can comfortably. Then just draw down. Repeat. This will help with the anxiety of having to have the pin on the X. Just let it float. The key is that you are nearly always floating toward the center, as soon as it drifts off a bit you automatically start to bring it back. The problem with punching the trigger is not that you hit the trigger when the pin is in the wrong spot, it is that the punch causes an erratic movement that throws everything off.

Release: try the blind bail method. Get close to a rather large target. Draw, close your eyes, and work on your release without worrying about being accurate. Work on squeezing the trigger softly so that you can get a smooth surprise release.

Together: Get back to 20 yards (or whereever you like to shoot from) and draw your bow. Concentrate on the aiming and let your release hand do it's thing.

Hope this helps a little

That's good advice. What you are experiencing is generally thrown under the umbrella of target panic (do a search on here for years of reading). Its a VERY common problem.

If you took your release and taped the trigger so that it could not fire, and then you drew the bow and tried to let the pin float, you would be able to do it all day long. Try it. This is simply because you can't shoot that arrow and your brain knows it, so it relaxes and will let you aim.

It can be fixed, but it will take work and dedication. Every serious target archer I have ever met has dealt with this at some point in their career. Good luck.
 
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