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I am currently shooting an elite 35, but getting ready to trade it in a week or so. I was messing around last night, and shooting groups at 20 yards. Every group all arrows were touching. In one group I knocked 2 fletchings off one arrow, so I decided to rip the other off and shoot the bare shaft and see what happened. Well, needless to say it did not land with the rest of the arrows. It hit the target about 9 inchs low, and about 5 inches nock high at an angle. If my fletched arrows are grouping, how important is it to bare shaft tune my bow?
 

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From what you related, one shot doesn't tell the whole story. Poor form, poor shot execution, poor grip can greatly effect a bare shaft. I'm a pretty shot and can't bare shaft tune to save my life. My bows are have binary cams, not that I believe yoke tuning. I don't believe in shimming as I believe bow companies' R&D departments know more than me.

Bare shaft tuning is but one tuning procedure. Other tuning procedures will tune a bow just as well.
 

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My best results, as far as grouping, are when my bareshaft hits at 7 o'clock from my fletched arrows. Now that is no more then 1/2" out of the group but it hits consistently there. I actually carry a bareshaft in my bow bag and check it ever so often to check my tune......
 

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I am currently shooting an elite 35, but getting ready to trade it in a week or so. I was messing around last night, and shooting groups at 20 yards. Every group all arrows were touching. In one group I knocked 2 fletchings off one arrow, so I decided to rip the other off and shoot the bare shaft and see what happened. Well, needless to say it did not land with the rest of the arrows. It hit the target about 9 inchs low, and about 5 inches nock high at an angle. If my fletched arrows are grouping, how important is it to bare shaft tune my bow?
OP, IMO bare shaft tuning is important becasue it tell you a lot about whats going on with 1. Your form, and 2. how the arrow is leaving the bow. If you can shoot a bareshaft over and over and get the same result then you know you are consistant. If your arrow is sticking in the target at an angle thats tell you how much work your vanes are doing to steer and straighten up you arrow in flight. I like knowing my arrow is coming out of the bow flying straight and true. With all that being said can you kill deer and shoot 300 Vegas rounds with an untuned bow that makes a huge tear in paper......YES. So really its up to you.
 

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for me b.s. tune is the final step in tune ing...once my b.s. and fletched arrows hit same poi i can shoot any fixed blade at any distance and keep up with target points.... I don,t shoot b.h. further than 50yrds usually my shots are under 25 yrds. BUT my reason for b.s. tune is to know my hunting setup is launching a arrow straight into an animal. I shoot 51lbs and need all the gas I can get, and a strait arrow with 55lbs k.e. seems to work just fine.
 

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For field points, it's not very important, even though I personally feel that my bows are more forgiving if they are tuned well to my form and shooting style. However, if you screw on fixed blade broadheads, you'll quickly see how important tuning really is.
 

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If you intend on using broadheads, your bs results are very important.
I believe this is very true. I always shoot a bare shaft, really trying to focus on form while doing so. I've got all three of my bows shooting bare shafts with fletched out to 20 yards. Check out Ranch Fairy's youtube videos on the subject.
 

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What is your goal? Your fletchings are having to do more work in order to straighten up your shaft (robbing you of energy), your bow is less forgiving, and if you want to shoot a fixed broadhead, it will be down there with your bare shaft (probably worse). You don't have to shoot a tuned bow, after all, it's your bow Right?. I like to shoot a bare shaft to tune my form. Some days I shoot nothing but bare shafts. If you can shoot tight groups of bare shafts, your form is consistent, which will translate into much higher scores, tighter groups, and good hits on animals. Why would anybody not want these results?
 

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From what you related, one shot doesn't tell the whole story. Poor form, poor shot execution, poor grip can greatly effect a bare shaft. I'm a pretty shot and can't bare shaft tune to save my life. My bows are have binary cams, not that I believe yoke tuning. I don't believe in shimming as I believe bow companies' R&D departments know more than me.

Bare shaft tuning is but one tuning procedure. Other tuning procedures will tune a bow just as well.
I have no doubt that bow companies R&D departments know more than I do. I also have no doubt that the vagaries if manufacturing tolerances combine in the real world to require cam shimming at times.

If you don't believe in yoke tuning I don't know what to tell you. Pretty easy to try, and effective.
 

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Don't forget that when shooting bareshafts - nock indexing becomes pretty important - especially if you are shooting lower tolerance arrows that were not cut from both ends.

In order to be confident in what your bareshaft is telling you - you need to be shooting more than one as well.

I was helping my buddy paper tune his Realm the other day. He was frustrated because we got his bareshaft to shoot bullets but his fletched arrow was tearing nock high and right. We thought there was fletching contact so we busted out the foot powder spray - no vane contact with his QAD rest. Then I said - "shoot a different fletched arrow". That one was a bullet hole. We proceeded to turn the nock on his first fletched arrow (that was nock high-right) and got it to shoot a bullet hole as well.

NOTE: These are Beman factory fletched arrows WITH the spine alignment mark right on the arrow - and cock vane oriented up and indexed to the spine alignment mark. So this indicates DYNAMIC SPINE inconsistency was the culprit.
 

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Don't forget that when shooting bareshafts - nock indexing becomes pretty important - especially if you are shooting lower tolerance arrows that were not cut from both ends.

In order to be confident in what your bareshaft is telling you - you need to be shooting more than one as well.

I was helping my buddy paper tune his Realm the other day. He was frustrated because we got his bareshaft to shoot bullets but his fletched arrow was tearing nock high and right. We thought there was fletching contact so we busted out the foot powder spray - no vane contact with his QAD rest. Then I said - "shoot a different fletched arrow". That one was a bullet hole. We proceeded to turn the nock on his first fletched arrow (that was nock high-right) and got it to shoot a bullet hole as well.

NOTE: These are Beman factory fletched arrows WITH the spine alignment mark right on the arrow - and cock vane oriented up and indexed to the spine alignment mark. So this indicates DYNAMIC SPINE inconsistency was the culprit.
Very easily could have also been a bad nock, back of the arrow not cut square, or just the very last bit of arrow was not straight or concentric. I tune my arrows out of a shooting machine, and a simple nock change, bushing change, or a resquare of the back of the arrow can make a big difference on arrow flight.
 

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I have no doubt that bow companies R&D departments know more than I do. I also have no doubt that the vagaries if manufacturing tolerances combine in the real world to require cam shimming at times.

If you don't believe in yoke tuning I don't know what to tell you. Pretty easy to try, and effective.
Typo error; My bows have binary cams, not that I (don't) believe yoke tuning. Can't yoke tune if your bow doesn't have them. Haven't shimmed a bow in 18 years. Had some pretty wild wheel and cam lean which didn't effect accuracy or performance.
 

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I do my initial set up in my garage, i paper tune for a bare shaft bullet at 10 ft. Then I pack all my stuff ( bow press) and take it to the range. Once (yolk tune / shim , rest adjustment) I can get a better shift hitting with fletched at 25 yds, Then I start shooting fixed broadheads. If the broadheads are hitting out to 45 yards, I consider my bow tuned.

I’ve only had two bow that allowed me to shoot a bear shaft into the white on a 1 spot target , Bowtech specialist and my realm x today.


This is on a realm x, comfort setting.
Today is what I consider the best tuning job I ever did. I got multiple bare shaft billeted last night in the garage, Today when I went to the range, I didn’t have to do any rest tuning or rest tuning.

I got the fixed broad head to hit at 45 yds on the first attempt.

I will shoot to fix Brodhead at 55 and 65. If there is no left/right movement out of the arrow, I wont do anymore tuning.

I’ve been doing bare shaft tuning probably for about six years, For me, my opinion is it is very dependent upon shooting form.

When I got the bare shaft to hit at 35 my form and follow through was absolutely perfect.

That being said, I had a Bowtech carbon overdrive which was a very fast bow , very aggressive cam, Sometimes even at 25 yards I couldn’t get the bare shaft to hit in the white but I could get the fixed broadheAd to hit at 65.

My main reason for bare shaft tuning Is that it allows me to illuminate some big problems in my garage before I go to the range, and saves on some time and frustration. This year I started shooting bare shaft at 5 yards inside the garage at the reduced size 3 spot target, I do think it exposes any flaws in my technique.


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I never have bare shaft tuned, a lot of guys do very successfully. I paper tune and walk back or French tune and that’s all I have needed. I shoot mechanicals and they fly with field points. I like to shoot well, like everyone else, but I love to hunt. Whatever it takes to get them to go where you want them.
 

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After some advice form Ontarget and Huntinskr bs tuning is the only way I will do it from now on. Will a bow group without it absolutely but your broadheads will not group with field points. I also think your bow looses some efficiency if your not bs tuned because your fletching has to work harder to stabilize the arrow. If shooting low poundage you need all the efficiency you can get.
 

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I was a pretty hardcore BS tuner for a year or so. Then I had an epiphany. When was the last time I actually shot a BS at anything when it counted? Answer was, never. So,after I get my bow tuned in at 20yds, I shoot fixed blade heads. Those tell me exactly what my bow wants. Now,usually after a BS tune,fixed were flying with field points. However,sometimes they didn't. In the end,I just skipped BS tuning all together. Just playing a little devils advocate :wink:
 

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Not very, there is all sorts of ways to tune and bs is the flavor of the month. My opinion only your's may vary, anymore I shoot through paper get it close and then go right to BH tuning. I shoot the same head all the time so it don't matter to Me how other heads fly if fp and bh are good so am I.


I have used all tuning methods out there now I just cut to the chase and tune for the only thing that really matter's to Me the hunt.
 
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