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Built a cresting / spin jig last night and discovered that some of the woodies I have, have a 1/8" wobble.

I know the jigs good as the carbons had no percivable wobble as you would expect.

I know woodies will never match carbons so how straight is straight? And how much wobble is acceptable.
 

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CD -

Straightness or run-out isn't as big a deal as some folks think. Spine and weight tolerances are a lot more critical to consistency/accuracy. With that, I'd have a little trouble with a 1/8" wobble, even though I "know" it wouldn't really matter for short distance shooting, it would be in the back of my mind - and that "wood" factor into my shooting.

Viper1 out.
 

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Maybe a certain amount/type of arrow "wobble" that is mounted with a fieldpoint is acceptable when shooting at paper and foam. But, put some wings (broadhead) on the front of the shaft and Houston you have a problem. For the purpose of killing large game, any excessive and unusual movement of a shaft should be unacceptable.

Excessive movement of a shaft increases friction and drag and will shed off speed, increase trajectory, decrease penetration energy (kinetic energy) and will impede efficient and maximum penetration. If the bow is one in the lower range of draw-force, the negative affect can be greater.

What needs to be clarified regarding the "wobble," is whether the wobble (straighteness) is not so severe that it will not produce flight characteristics outside the natural phenomenon variety that all arrows undergo from the shot to recovery stage. Or is the flight wobble that may be imparted of the uncommon variety. That won't be known until the arrow is loaded and shot.

The bottom line is; some shafts are too out of true to be used for serious hunting.
 

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Its a pain but I get my woodies down to +/- .002" That's .004" TIR (total indicated runout.) since I'm able to do it, that's my standard. Outside of that, the shaft is junk or for stump shooting as far as I'm concerned. Can I actually shoot that difference? Probably not. But It removes any question from my mind. Target or hunting.
 

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agreed even for my SCA shooting I try to straighten them as much as I can. Cresting them when they are not straight is plain hard.....
 

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Ah Ha… It appears that building a jig has brought a more critical eye to the construction of wooden arrows. As far as the cresting goes, I usually pick the end that needs the least amount of straightening for the cresting and fletching. This will produce finer lines, plus, any need for repeated straightening of the feathered end only promises to become more problematic.

That said, I hope it does not come as a surprise that wood shafts do not all come perfectly straight and that restraightening just comes with the territory. When I’m building wooden arrows I’ll recheck them multiple times before I’m done and there still might be a stubborn one or two in the group (…I usually make 13 or 14 if I need to end up with precisely 12 good ones).

Sure, a less than straight arrow can still fly true to the target (works for wood and works for aluminum)…but there is absolutely no perceptible wobble to the broadhead arrows I shoot at game, whether on a wooden shaft or otherwise. I wouldn't accept less from an arrow someone else made...certainly not going to happen with my own. Enjoy, Rick.
 

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Maybe a certain amount/type of arrow "wobble" that is mounted with a fieldpoint is acceptable when shooting at paper and foam. But, put some wings (broadhead) on the front of the shaft and Houston you have a problem. For the purpose of killing large game, any excessive and unusual movement of a shaft should be unacceptable.

The bottom line is; some shafts are too out of true to be used for serious hunting.
Hi Windwalker.... :teeth:

I agree with you about wobble being problematic for shooting, however, I'm not sure you appropriately described the risk. I personally don't look at wobble to determine whether or not I'm going to use a particular arrow, but rather, whether or not it can hit the target. You don't say what excessive movement is, but many wood arrows or cane arrows I've seen videos of have wobble that some might consider really excessive yet hit their target.

If an arrow has a curve in it that takes the front of the arrow out of alignment with the rear, I'm in complete agreement with you about the potential outcomes, especially with broadheads. However, just because they wobble doesn't mean they have to be scrapped.

In our resident opinions of three... :)

Aloha... :cool::beer:
 

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ratt:

Maybe a certain amount/type of arrow "wobble" that is mounted with a fieldpoint is acceptable when shooting at paper and foam.
However, for hunting purposes the best accuracy and lethality obtainable is paramount.

Excessive movement of a shaft increases friction and drag and will shed off speed, increase trajectory, decrease penetration energy (kinetic energy) and will impede efficient and maximum penetration. If the bow is one in the lower range of draw-force, the negative affect can be greater.
 

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Tom -

The odds are your wood arrows have up to .025" runout and I doubt you've had any problems hunting with them.

The less people know or understand, the more they worry about things that really don't matter. A runout of .025" won't severely affect anything at hunting distances (except maybe the shooter, psychologically) however an arrow that looks like a strung longbow might.

Sometime around when "trad" became a word, common sense left the archer's lexicon.

Viper1 out.
 

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Now that is one thing I have never done. Given a bent shaft, shoot it, decide if its shootable, then measure the runout. Never bothered trying to find a limit to how much runout really is acceptable.
 

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However, for hunting purposes the best accuracy and lethality obtainable is paramount.
Relative to what you shoot, no doubt:D Best accuracy and lethality can be quite subjective when defined from our own perspectives. No doubt, the "best" for those two requirements of hunting purposes can vary from shooting cane & flint to one shooting cartridges and lead. What's the best "obtainable" as being paramount seems more a personal preference than requirement. No?
 

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ratt:



However, for hunting purposes the best accuracy and lethality obtainable is paramount.

Hi Windwalker.... totally agree but would substitute shot placement for accuracy... and splitting hairs to be sure.. :teeth: I'm of the opinion that sharp broadheads and heavy arrows take care of lethality, and if the arrow has proper placement, you've done your job.

I agree with Viper on this, it is essentially where you point the arrow that matters whether you hit your target. I shoot all arrows I hunt with ahead of the hunt. Those that make it into the bucket go hunting, those that don't wear rubbers.

Much Aloha... :cool::beer:
 

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but would substitute shot placement for accuracy
I agree with Viper on this, it is essentially where you point the arrow that matters whether you hit your target
I'll have to jot those down.

My point has been; until Celtic loads the shafts with broadheads and shoots them in under simulated hunting conditions and distances, it is a total presumption that the "wobble" he detected is nothing to sweat and will not affect the performance and accuracy of the arrows.

I have a set of prime woodies that were set up, grain-indexed, and balanced to the ultimate. Yet, as is the norm with woodies, some fly a bit better than others, but not such an extreme variation as to deem them not accurate. I have the shafts marked in accordance with shot performance. If any show any signs of having the tendency to be a "flier," they are not used for hunting large game.

How was I able to determine performance and accuracy? I set them up with broadheads, tuned them, and shot them at varied distances up to 30 yards.
 

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I'll have to jot those down.

My point has been; until Celtic loads the shafts with broadheads and shoots them in under simulated hunting conditions and distances, it is a total presumption that the "wobble" he detected is nothing to sweat and will not affect the performance and accuracy of the arrows.

I have a set of prime woodies that were set up, grain-indexed, and balanced to the ultimate. Yet, as is the norm with woodies, some fly a bit better than others, but not such an extreme variation as to deem them not accurate. I have the shafts marked in accordance with shot performance. If any show any signs of having the tendency to be a "flier," they are not used for hunting large game.

How was I able to determine performance and accuracy? I set them up with broadheads, tuned them, and shot them at varied distances up to 30 yards.
Aloha Windwalker....

I'm with you totally on this as regards woodies. I've not figured out yet why woodies do what woodies do, and shooting them before hunting shows me that arrows that should, don't, and arrows that shouldn't, do.. That's why I'm with you on shooting them with the broadheads first and setting them aside, those for the hunt and those for the stump.

Much Aloha... :cool: :beer:
 

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Tom -

That's generally sound advise when dealing with any variable and wood is "by nature" is a variable. Closer inspection might show that the "stump" arrows are those with weight and spine inconsistencies and not necessarily runout. Assuming of course, that the arrow builder and shooter are both doing their parts.

Viper1 out.
 

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Tom -

That's generally sound advise when dealing with any variable and wood is "by nature" is a variable. Closer inspection might show that the "stump" arrows are those with weight and spine inconsistencies and not necessarily runout. Assuming of course, that the arrow builder and shooter are both doing their parts.

Viper1 out.
Aloha.. Viper.... that the arrow builder and shooter are both doing their parts. the other variable.... :teeth:

Much Aloha... :cool::beer:
 
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