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Discussion Starter #1
I consider myself to be a pretty good shot. I shoot targets for hunting preparation only and expect what I call "hunting accuracy" which to me is a 1" per 10 yds. group. Will I see the difference between an arrow with a straightness of .003 vs. .006. I am a machinist by trade and .003 is a lot when you are talking about the fit of metal components but we are talking carbon arrows that are flexing at the shot and are not a very rigid material to begin with. It seems to me that this would be a non factor unless shooting from a hooter shooter where the human factor is removed.
 

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I'll be honest, I don't believe that there is much difference in real world situations. I pretty much convinced myself of this yesterday, when I shot my Gold Tip Expedition .006 arrows against the Gold Tip Pros .001 at 50 yards. No differences at all at that range. Both arrows shot very consistent and flew perfectly.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Great news

I'll be honest, I don't believe that there is much difference in real world situations. I pretty much convinced myself of this yesterday, when I shot my Gold Tip Expedition .006 arrows against the Gold Tip Pros .001 at 50 yards. No differences at all at that range. Both arrows shot very consistent and flew perfectly.
That was the response I was hoping for because I am looking at the Expeditions vs. the XT Hunters and it appears that the only difference between the two is the straightness. Oh and the price too.
 

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There is a difference between the two especially when you put a broadhead on the front.
You being a machinist should understand the difference. Put a crooked arrow on a spin device and attach a broadhead and just think what will happen when that arrow is coming out of your bow at mach speed. The broadhead will grab the air differently from arrow to another. Your groups will degrade.

There is a bright side. If you have a short draw 27” or less you can cut your arrows from each end and make your arrows straighter. If you however have a longer draw you will need to get the better arrows.

You won’t see a pro archer shooting a crooked shaft for target because you are shooting such a small x or a small 12 ring. The last thing you don’t want is to miss because your arrow took a right turn.

There is a difference!
 

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I have foud the 006's and "less straight arrows" generally fly straight but you do seem to always find one or two per dozen that just don't group with the rest.
 

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I shoot radial x weaves and cant tell any difference between .oo1 and .oo6.I do cut both ends on the advise from PSE.I only shoot for prep for hunting ,too. My bow shoots better than I do!!!, But I strive for 2" @ 40 ,when it ain't 2" it's just me!:shade:
 

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All this maybe true but straightness between .006 and .003 is a null factor what it really comes down to is spine consistency. Like you said the arrows flex in flight so who cares if its straight from the beginning because the second it leaves the bow until the time it hits the target it will have more then .006" of flex in it. The spine is what is going to make it flex the same every-time. That is what you should look for.

There is a difference between the two especially when you put a broadhead on the front.
You being a machinist should understand the difference. Put a crooked arrow on a spin device and attach a broadhead and just think what will happen when that arrow is coming out of your bow at mach speed. The broadhead will grab the air differently from arrow to another. Your groups will degrade.

There is a bright side. If you have a short draw 27” or less you can cut your arrows from each end and make your arrows straighter. If you however have a longer draw you will need to get the better arrows.

You won’t see a pro archer shooting a crooked shaft for target because you are shooting such a small x or a small 12 ring. The last thing you don’t want is to miss because your arrow took a right turn.

There is a difference!
 

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Spine variation will matter more than the straightness. Problem is, when you buy a cheaper carbon, you also get less spine consistency along with the lack of straightness.

Put some aluminums (to take away the spine variation) that are made at .006 straightness on a hooter shooter, with broadheads, you will see no difference.
 

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All this maybe true but straightness between .006 and .003 is a null factor what it really comes down to is spine consistency. Like you said the arrows flex in flight so who cares if its straight from the beginning because the second it leaves the bow until the time it hits the target it will have more then .006" of flex in it. The spine is what is going to make it flex the same every-time. That is what you should look for.
Quoted For Truth
 

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Discussion Starter #12
There is a difference between the two especially when you put a broadhead on the front.
You being a machinist should understand the difference. Put a crooked arrow on a spin device and attach a broadhead and just think what will happen when that arrow is coming out of your bow at mach speed. The broadhead will grab the air differently from arrow to another. Your groups will degrade.

There is a bright side. If you have a short draw 27” or less you can cut your arrows from each end and make your arrows straighter. If you however have a longer draw you will need to get the better arrows.

You won’t see a pro archer shooting a crooked shaft for target because you are shooting such a small x or a small 12 ring. The last thing you don’t want is to miss because your arrow took a right turn.

There is a difference!

In a controlled situation, I agree, but I am talking real world comparisons. I am a machinist working with very precise tools and produce precise products, but when it comes to me shooting a bow, I am not precision enough where I can see .003 making a huge difference in my grouping capabilities. As far as broadheads, can you verify that your broadhead is catching air exactly the same with every arrow every time you shoot them. I do not think this would be possible even if you were shooting perfectly straight arrows. I could see the argument if we were talking about a larger difference but not with .003.
 

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All this maybe true but straightness between .006 and .003 is a null factor what it really comes down to is spine consistency. Like you said the arrows flex in flight so who cares if its straight from the beginning because the second it leaves the bow until the time it hits the target it will have more then .006" of flex in it. The spine is what is going to make it flex the same every-time. That is what you should look for.
In a controlled situation, I agree, but I am talking real world comparisons. I am a machinist working with very precise tools and produce precise products, but when it comes to me shooting a bow, I am not precision enough where I can see .003 making a huge difference in my grouping capabilities. As far as broadheads, can you verify that your broadhead is catching air exactly the same with every arrow every time you shoot them. I do not think this would be possible even if you were shooting perfectly straight arrows. I could see the argument if we were talking about a larger difference but not with .003.
He (SW) needs to read the above.
 

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agree

Spine variation will matter more than the straightness. Problem is, when you buy a cheaper carbon, you also get less spine consistency along with the lack of straightness.

Put some aluminums (to take away the spine variation) that are made at .006 straightness on a hooter shooter, with broadheads, you will see no difference.
I agree, the issue is with consistency of spine.

If you are willing to weed out "flyers" then you should be fine.
 

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archerm3
this post is for you

When it comes to shooting I will agree the spine of on arrow is more important. However this man asked if a straight arrow is better than a crooked arrow. Looking at your avatar I noticed you are shooting fingers. Shooting fingers you won’t notice a difference because you are handicapping yourself with your equipment. I shoot a compound with a release and every thing you can do to your set up ie. Tune, arrow spine, correct draw length, correct peep height, and having straight arrows will ultimately help out with your accuracy. Even if you are not a good shot!

You won’t see a person on the line in Vegas with a crooked arrow.

As for broadheads I will stand by my theory as I can tell the difference in a bad spined arrow or a crooked arrow. I shoot fix blades.

I only use the best and have had pretty good success while hunting for public land high country mule deer or shooting targets.




 

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In a controlled situation, I agree, but I am talking real world comparisons. I am a machinist working with very precise tools and produce precise products, but when it comes to me shooting a bow, I am not precision enough where I can see .003 making a huge difference in my grouping capabilities. As far as broadheads, can you verify that your broadhead is catching air exactly the same with every arrow every time you shoot them. I do not think this would be possible even if you were shooting perfectly straight arrows. I could see the argument if we were talking about a larger difference but not with .003.

I can tell the difference even if it is a mental thing. I simply wont leave the excusse I didnt win a tournment or kill a big buck to my equipment.

purchase the best you can afford and you wont ever look back and this goes for just about anything in the hunting world.

good luck with what ever you buy wish you the best.
 

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I'm here to tell you straighter is better. I've run the gamut of spin testing broadheads, and shafts. If I can see the broadhead wobble, whether due to the shaft, insert, or broadhead, it will NOT fly true. Been there, done that. This holds true from Spitfires, to Muzzy's, to Magnus Stingers, and even ABC Sonics.

If it's crooked it won't fly straight. I shoot a 25" cut shaft length, "normally" I can straighten an .003 shaft to tighter specs, but, not always. Spine, and straightness are equally important, when it comes to hunting.
 
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