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How to know when it's time for better limbs

1094 Views 16 Replies 10 Participants Last post by  martinfuchs
Dear all,

I am pretty new to Olympic Recurve shooting. I picked up my first bow in January of this year and my first Olympic recurve bow in February. I started with 30lbs Hoyt Formula Excel limbs, switched to 34lbs limbs in May and a couple of weeks ago I switched to 38lbs Hoyt Formula Excels. I shoot a 27" riser with long limbs and pull 43lbs on the fingers.

I am wondering when the "right" time comes to upgrade to better limbs, possibly to X-Tours or Quattros if I can find some used in 38lbs. I discussed this with my coach and he said that if I have the money I could upgrade now and that I should stay at this weight for a while. My personal best is 270/300 indoors, I have limited outdoor experience.

I am curious as to what you guys think and whether or not an investment like this makes sense at this point in my short archery life. I am sure there are many different opinions out there but am curious.

Thanks a lot,
Martin
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270/300 is a pretty good score for less than a year experience..

i would say buy the best limbs and arrows you can afford right now although you didn't mention what riser you have..

your present wt is fine also for outdoor and if you don't have them yet get shibuya or sureloc sights and a beiter plunger..
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for your comments guys. I guess I am wondering if the fact that top of the line limbs will be more accurate but therefore also less forgiving of mistakes, will be a problem for someone with my experience level. I only have experience with the Formula Excel limbs and just don't know if I should spend about $450 for Formula ACE limbs or if the extra $330 or so would make sense to invest in X-Tours if I have the money.

Martin
 

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I guess I am wondering if the fact that top of the line limbs will be more accurate but therefore also less forgiving of mistakes, will be a problem for someone with my experience level..

Martin
Martin, the higher end limbs tend to be a little more forgiving as they are more stable and may give you a few more fps. Most people like the higher end limbs because they usually have a nicer feel. That being said, it's likely there will be no improvement in your score with the more expensive limbs. Since you are using Formula limbs, I'd suggest trying a set of used Quattros to make up your mind for yourself.

Paul
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Martin, the higher end limbs tend to be a little more forgiving as they are more stable and may give you a few more fps. Most people like the higher end limbs because they usually have a nicer feel. That being said, it's likely there will be no improvement in your score with the more expensive limbs. Since you are using Formula limbs, I'd suggest trying a set of used Quattros to make up your mind for yourself.

Paul
I thought that as well, thanks Paul. I've been looking for used long 38 or 40lbs Formula Quattros for a bit now but haven't come across them yet. I'll keep looking.

Martin
 

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I would upgrade at the next move-up in weight. If you stick with your current limbs longer and determine there will be no increase in weight, then proceed with limb upgrade at that time. 43# OTF is plenty for outdoor and no weight increase may be necessary. The Formula Excel limbs are pretty good and I doubt you would see an actual increase in scores from upgrading. The subjective feel might be better and that could possibly result in (or coincide with) an increase in scores, but I suspect if we were to do a double-blind test it would be difficult to definitively identify a statistically significant score increase.
 

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Is your wife ok with you spending the money? If the answer is 'yes' then buy them. If the answer is 'no', buy them and make sure they don't get delivered to your home.
lol - this is what I do. More expensive equipment won't really give you an increase in score. BUT - it gives you confidence and satisfaction. New expensive limbs shine better, sound better, have better subjective feeling, stand up from the crowd and make you wanting to practice more and shoot more and take your bow to different competitions with proud

Buy everything you can afford, be proud of it, be confident, shoot better. And deliver to your neighbors house, off course, so, your wife doesn't see how much you've spent already :)
 

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FWIW, back when I was starting out, after a few months I moved up to 36# with some $100 Kaya K1 limbs on a Nexus riser. I got a promotion at work and to celebrate, I bought an HPX with F7 limbs, also marked at 36#. I felt no physical difference pulling either bow back. The only thing that changed was my arrow speed went up significantly. My scores remained the same.
 

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For unknown reasons I like my newer high priced limbs on an older riser and not the newer high priced riser I purchased them for. The new high priced riser I like shooting & enjoy more with less costly mid-range limbs. Is this between the ears? Maybe! Is it about feel? Perhaps!
I hear the word "forgiving" all the time. I sure that word is overused when we can't explain why we shoot better with one bow over another. I understand why the design on one high priced limb might be better than another but I still have to make the shot and a bad shot is a bad shot.
I'm not shooting Oly long enough to explain that if it's even explainable. Archery is about personal preferences more than equipment rating or cost. What I've learned is not to buy anything that I can't test shoot first.
I do know when a bow is comfortable in mind, body and my confidence is high I shoot my best. I've made costly mistakes shopping for a price over everything else. Now, if It feels right, when I test shoot it, it will be the right choice no matter the cost.
Compound shooters know, "the bow chooses the archer"! I suspect limbs choose the shooter if the riser agrees.
N
 

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i'm kinda biased but have you tried an ILF riser?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
i'm kinda biased but have you tried an ILF riser?
I have not, but that's also not an option for me. When I bought my Olympic Recurve at the end of January I was told by multiple people that I should get a 27" riser instead of a 25" one due to my draw length. I drove out to Lancaster and the only 27" riser they had left was the floor model of a Hoyt Prodigy RX. I tried it and liked it, had some extra money and decided to just go for it. So even though I never shot before I spent a lot of money on a really nice riser. I was aware that I'd lock myself into the Formula system. So I just couldn't justify switching to ILF...

Martin
 
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